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Full text of "Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865"

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MASS. SECRETARY OF THE COMMQNWEA r .'T:l 



Massachusetts in thk Army and Navy 



During the War of 1861-65. 



Prepared under the authority of the State 

by 

THOMAS WENTWORTH HIGGINSON, 

State Military and Naval Historian. 



Vol. I. 



" The minstrel slDgs 
Before them of the ten years' war in Troy 
And our great deeds, as half-forgotten things." 

— Tennyson, " The Lotos Eaters." 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1896. 






<$ 



on 












Preface. 



The legislation under which this work has been prepare 1 
•orded as follows : — 

[Chapter 374, Acts of 1889.] 

r ACT providing for the Appointment of a State Militar 

torian. 

it enac'i, etc., as follows: 

Sect: 1. The governor with the advice and consent oi 
pw / sable person as state military and naval historian, 

collee a compile, within five' years, ready for publication, 
:eu b;> assachusetts soldiers and sailors in the war of the r 

Sect. 2. The said state historian shall receive as compen 
ai-sand lobars a year, with necessary expenses not to exceet 
a<")y one year. He may at any time be removed from offic 

ated by the governor with the advice and consent of the c< 

Sect. 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [A 

Two years later the amount allowed for necessary 
im five hundred to fifteen hundred dollars. The le 
3,,naval portion of the tables was prepared may be i 
the second volume. This portion was in no wa\ 
3 editor of this work, but was kindly plac ^ 
Ijutant-General and Captain Wilson, its compiler. 

The printing of the completed work began in May 
piration of the historian's term of office (June 12, 189 
ate printing, it has been executed at the ofiice of i 
has been under the direction of Hon. Wm, M. Olin, 
b proofs being supervised by the State historian, who 



PREFACE. 



wice extended for this purpose, under the follow 
by two successive Legislatures : — 

VE providing for the Benewal of the Appointment' 
tary and Naval Historian. 

oed, That the governor and council be and they are hert 
appointment of the state military and naval historian at . 
isation and allowances, to continue for such period, not 
v be necessary for'the purpose of supervising the publicatio 
-roper use of such new material as may be obtained fi\ 
~3where during the process of publication. 

^served that these two resolutions placed upon the historian 
ordinary duty of proof-reading but of a constant use of new 
i.is, as will be hereafter seen, was a serious responsibility, 
nd printers. 

islation in regard to the publication of the work was is 
ing a somewhat similar provision made by the Legislature 



dde for printing and distributing the Massachusetts Mili- 
tary and Naval History. 

here be allowed and paid out of the treasury of the Common- 

fceeding seven thousand dollars, to be expended under the 

•ary of the Commonwealth for publishing the Massachusetts 

u ,ory, prepared by Thomas Wentworth Higginson, state mili- 

n, under authority of chapter three hundred and seventy-four 

■ eighteen hundred and eighty-nine. Said history shall be 

s, and there shall be printed sixteen hundred copies thereof, 

ows : To each member and officer of the general court of 

d and ninety-four, one copy ; to each member and officer 

le year eighteen hundred and ninety-five, including the 

it doorkeepers and messengers, one copy ; to the governor, 

each member of the executive council of the year eighteen 

four, and each member of the executive council of the year 

.1 ninety-five, the secretaiy, treasurer, auditor and attorney- 

mwealth, and the private secretary of the governor, one copy ; 

al, one copy ; to each reporter regularly assigned to a sc~' n 

py ; also one copy to the soldiers' home in Chelsea : i 



PREFACE. 



post of the Grand Army of the Republic in the Commonwealth, one copy ; to each 
free public library, one copy ; to each city and town in which there is no free 
public library, one copy ; to the state library, twenty copies ; to the state military 
and naval historian, twenty copies ; to such historical societies in the Common- 
wealth as may be designated by the secretary of the Commonwealth, one copy 
each ; to each state and territory of the United States, one copy ; the remaining 
copies to be held by the secretary of the Commonwealth subject to future calls or 
to be sold at a price not less than cost. 

Resolved, That chapter ninety-four of the resolves of the year eighteen hundred 
and ninety-four is hereby repealed. 

It will be seen that it was left absolutely to the discretion of the State 
historian what kind of work he was to prepare ; nor could be obtain any- 
more specific instructions either from the governor who appointed hJm or 
the member who had introduced and carried through the legislation creating 
the office. The following letter will establish this fact, and, though Colonel 
Carpenter is not now living, there can be no impropriety in publishing it : — ■ 

Boston, Mass., April 4, 1895. 

My Dear Colonel : — Upon reaching home from a Southern trip this morning 

I found your favor of April 1. You are right in stating that the bill for the 

appointment of a military and naval historian was mine, and you are also correct in 

the view that there was no understanding in regard to the manner of your procedure, 

but it was left entirely with you to carry on the work as you deemed best, without 

restrictions whatever. It is true I called your attention to the history of the 

Vermont troops, which I regarded of value ; but in view of the criticism I am very 

glad to state that the matter was left entirely to your good judgment and discretion 

in formulating the history. 

I am very truly yours, 

Geo. N. Carpenter. • 

To Col. T. W. Higginson, 25 Buckingham Stbeet, Cambridge. 

A similar letter was received, about the same time, from the late 
ov. Oliver Ames, who made the appointment; but it is, perhaps, a 
too personal for publication. 

he word "history" in the original resolution seemed to imply a 
ice ; on the other hand, the words " collect and compile" seemed to 



Vi PREFACE. 



imply a compilation. The recent record of Vermont volunteer troops, to 
which Colonel Carpenter referred me as a good model, consisted wholly 
of tables and statistics, with no narrative at all. I therefore decided to 
combine these various elements in the best way I could, always limited 
as to time and expenditure by the very narrow conditions of the appro- 
priation. The result must be judged for itself. 

My thanks are due to Capt. Charles W. Wilson of the Adjutant- 
General's office, to Mrs. Mary A. Livermore and to Mrs. Florence W. 
Jaques for the portions of the book to which their names are especially 
attached. Mrs. Jaques has also been my principal assistant during the 
greater part of the progress of the work, and my thanks are also due to my 
admirable special assistants, Miss Grace Reed and Miss Eva G. Moore ; 
and also, at various times, to Miss Grace Cook, Miss Carlena Walker, Miss 
Louisa Winlock, Miss Mary A. Toye and Mr. Roger Gilman of Harvard 
University. I have received important aid through correspondence from 
Maj. E. W. Everson, Mr. F. B. Heitman of the War Department, Mr. T. 
S. Townsend, Captain Frederick Phisterer, Mr. J. C. Ropes and many 
others. I am also greatly indebted to the Wright & Potter Company, State 
Printers, for constant aid and counsel. 

T. W. H. 



Introduction. 



The plan of this book differs in detail from that of most of the State 
publications called out by the Civil War. The rosters of the various regi- 
ments had been published in detail, in the large work prepared by the 
Adjutant-General in 1868 and 1870, entitled "Record of the Massachu- 
setts Volunteers." That work was published at the expense of some sixty 
thousand dollars, and was in most respects faithfully and admirably exe- 
cuted ; but it had two great defects, — the one avoidable, the other 
unavoidable. The defect which might have been avoided was the absence 
of an index, this making the use of the book almost impracticable except to 
those who knew in advance just in what rank and regiment to seek for a 
given soldier. In other words, in order to use it, one must know in 
advance a large part of the information which the book itself was intended 
to convey. This defect is now partially remedied for the Adjutant- 
General's department, but not for the public, by an alphabetical card 
catalogue recently made, giving simply the name of each soldier with the 
number of his regiment, but without the dates of service. This is, how- 
ever, unprinted, and is not available to the community at large. 

The other defect was unavoidable, and grew out of a condition of things 
which may yet continue for many years, and must steadily impair the value 
of every book, however carefully prepared, which undertakes to give details 
in regard to individual officers or soldiers. To the civilian, nothing seems 
more fixed and definite than the military status of every one who served in 
the army. On the contrary, nothing was and is more fluid and changeable. 
It is now more than thirty years since the war closed ; but the constant 
revision of papers at the Record and Pension Office at Washington is 
steadily correcting dates of muster, dates of discharge, reports as to death 
or desertion and the grade of officers themselves. Private John Smith, 
for years reported as a deserter, may now turn j)ut to have died in a 



Vlll INTRODUCTION. 



Confederate prison ; his brother, Capt. Edward Smith, commissioned as 
lieutenant-colonel but never mustered, may now be retrospectively mus- 
tered, and recognized as a field officer, not a line officer. The giving of 
brevets, which became one of the most profuse and reckless practices of the 
war, and after it, has happily long ceased ; but new brevets have been 
issued, from time to time, to correct errors or deficiencies of old ones. All 
these various changes are supposed to be notified from the War Depart- 
ment to the officials of the State which they concern ; in some cases they 
are not so notified, and are obtained in answer to inquiry ; but the actual 
notifications come to Massachusetts at the rate of three hundred annually, 
or nearly one a day, and it was the constant receipt of these which led 
in 1889 to the official abandonment of the Record of the Massachusetts 
Volunteers as an authoritative work. It is very possible that a similar 
continuance of official changes will within twenty years supersede the 
present work. It may be necessary to inscribe on it, "Good for this 
decade only." This, however, is a matter beyond the editor's control. 

If it be asked how it is possible, in view of the complex records and 
tables supposed to have been kept by every regiment, that the ultimate 
facts need so much revision, the reply is that it is due in some degree to 
the very extent of those documents. What may be called the book-keeping 
of our volunteer army was borrowed from the book-keeping of our little 
regular army. It had suddenly to be expanded from thousands to millions, 
and this in the hands of a vast number of officials, hitherto untrained, 
thrown into the tumult of war and obliged to pick up hastily from one 
another the knowledge they needed. In some cases the regimental adjutant, 
upon whom all these matters finally depended, was simply a well-drilled 
militiaman, utterly without training in red tape ; in some other cases he 
was a man of red tape, without any training or natural gift as a soldier. 
In either case confusion resulted. The books, moreover, had to be filled 
out amid toilsome marches, after defeats, sometimes during the battle 
itself. Often the required monthly returns were not forwarded, — the 
Adjutant-General's early reports are full of complaint of this, — sometimes 
they were lost. 1 A single such loss might wholly vitiate the statistical 

i "Many of the regiments had lost their books and papers during their two years' service in the 
enemy's country, and with them their muster rolls." (Massachusetts, Adjutant-General's report, 
January, 1864, p. 8.) As to the small value of the original descriptive lists, see Bosson's 42d Mass. 
Infantry, p. iv. 



INTRODUCTION. IX 



record of a regiment or confuse the whole personal record of an officer or 
soldier. All these broken or scattered threads have been in the process of 
constant comparison and readjustment, ever since the war, both at Wash- 
ington and at each State capital. Questions of pension and State aid 
demanded this constant revision. As years go on, the documentary 
evidence becomes a little more complete. On the other hand, where there 
is a gap, it often grows harder and harder to fill it, for the only men who 
could supply the missing link now may be dead or wholly lost to view. 

History, it is now the fashion to say, is ''an inexact science." Con- 
sider, for instance, the perplexities arising from the complicated confusion 
of names among 150,000 State volunteers in a war of thirty years ago. 
Among the first 27,000 names of volunteers to whom bounties were paid in 
Massachusetts the following names were repeated to the extent named 
below: John Williams, 23 times; John Smith, 21; John Browo, 20; 
William Smith, 18 ; John Kelley, 16 ; John McCarty, 16 ; John Murphy, 
James Murphy, John O'Brien, James Sullivan, each 14; Charles Smith, 
12 times ; and so on indefinitely, down to 857 names which were simply 
duplicated. 1 In many cases these men are now unknown or forgotten even 
in the towns which they gave as their residence or enlistment. No human 
power can now unravel these perplexities ; and even among the smaller 
lists of officers' names there is a full share of them. 

It has also been a serious obstacle, up to this time, that the Kecord 
and Pension Office at the War Department, Washington, D. C, has 
hitherto been hermetically sealed to historical inquirers, although its 
internal arrangement is undoubtedly admirable, and all definite questions 
properly forwarded through the Massachusetts Adjutant-General's depart- 
ment have been promptly and kindly answered. By the efficient action of 
Senator Lodge a statute has now been passed permitting a fuller use of these 
archives in the future. This permission has come too late to be of much 
use to the present work, but when any further enterprise of this kind is 
undertaken it will be found of immense value. 

It is pretty certain that a more extended work — covering fully the 
name of every enlisted man — will yet be undertaken by the State. This 
book is not in any sense a complete or final thing. So far as it goes, it 

1 Adjutant-General's report, January, 1864, p. 14. 



INTRODUCTION. 



may justly claim to have been made, when possible, from the original 
sources, and is subject to the defects of these sources in respect to its 
undoubted errors. But the allotted period of five years has proved very 
insufficient to do even this work as it should be done, as will be plain when 
we think that those in charge of the naval chapter have been twenty years 
at work upon it, and can even now present only the commissioned officers 
in print. The best regimental histories — as those of the 1st Mass. Cavalry 
and of the 54th Mass. Infantry — have taken more than twenty years for 
their preparation. Not only was the limit of five years, as allowed by the 
statute providing for the work, far too limited, but the original allowance 
of five hundred dollars annually for clerk hire and necessary expenses was 
absurdly small ; and though after two years' effort this was increased to 
fifteen hundred dollars, yet even this was wholly inadequate for the amount 
to be done. When we consider that in preparing a somewhat similar work 
for the State of Connecticut — a much smaller State — fifteen thousand 
dollars had to be spent for clerical labor in Washington alone, it is plain 
that this Massachusetts work was devised on a scale of extreme moderation. 
The Illinois war book occupies eight volumes ; the Ohio book extends to 
eleven, and took twenty-eight years to prepare. But for the generous 
offer of the late Francis Minot Weld, M.D., to contribute five hundred 
dollars for the first year's expenses, the enterprise would probably have 
been abandoned by the present author in its very early stages. As a 
matter of fact, he was originally disposed to decline — partly on this 
ground — the task when offered him by the late Ex-Governor Ames, but was 
persuaded to its acceptance by the urgent solicitation of his friends the 
late General Devens and Ex-Go v. John D. Long. 

In regard to dates, the editor has found no authority so good, on the 
whole, as the records kept by the Loyal Legion ; and yet even these have 
this element of uncertainty, that they often rest simply on the memory of 
the men concerned ; and human memory is a very insecure dependence for 
the details of what happened thirty years ago. In the well-known words 
of the poet Gray, in one of his letters, " Memory is ten times worse than 
a lead pencil," meaning that the slightest memorandum taken at the time 
often outweighs the most ample reminiscences in which even an old soldier 
can indulge. 



INTRODUCTION. XI 



The most insecure ground is often that which should be strongest, — 
the record of an officer's muster. A regular officer's rank and pay date 
from his acceptance of his commission, and of this there is always docu- 
mentary proof at the War Department. In the volunteer service, on the 
other hand, officers were commissioned by the governor and subsequently 
mustered by some United States officer designated for the purpose ; but 
whether this supposed muster should bear the date on the actual day when 
the event occurred, or whether men should be mustered back to the date of 
their commission, or to the date when they joined their regiment, this 
depended largely upon the discretion of the mustering officer and often 
upon his whims. In either case his action was liable to be revised by some 
later authority; and an examination of the Official Army Register will 
show that in many cases the muster was set aside altogether, sometimes on 
very frivolous grounds, so that an officer who saw active service for years 
may now find himself standing on record as "not mustered," because of 
some technical defect, over which he had not the slightest control, on the 
part of the person who mustered him. There now exists an order by which 
any dissatisfied officer may demand a revision of his record ; but this order 
is little known, and the men subjected to the injustice have often died or 
grown indifferent ; and finally the application, when granted, simply throws 
new labor on the historian. Many of these corrections are transmitted to 
the Adjutant-General's office at Boston, but others are not transmitted, and 
some are discovered only by accident, at "Washington. 

There are unquestionably in this book, therefore, as in every book of 
this description up to this date, hundreds of errors of detail ; and the only 
consolation is to be found in the fact that this does not result from any 
want of labor, and that in many cases no added time or effort could have 
accomplished anything more. So far as the regular army goes, — and this 
includes, practically, the general officers, by brevet or otherwise, — far 
greater accuracy can be obtained than in any other cases, especially since 
the publication of the admirable semi-official Historical Register of Mr. 
B. F. Heitman of the War Department, to whose private correspondence I 
am also greatly indebted. In other chapters, as the lists of Massachusetts 
officers in the United States Colored Troops and in regiments of other 
States, the information has had to be sought piecemeal through a multitude 



xii INTRODUCTION. 



of State and local histories, or with the aid of the various commanderies of 
the Loyal Legion, — an aid given in most cases with admirable and gen- 
erous efficiency. As it is, it is not likely that the two lists just named 
comprise more than two-thirds of the Massachusetts officers of such organi- 
zations, whereas in the regular army and in the Massachusetts regiments 
the actual omissions should be very few. 

It has been necessary in the lists of officers contained in this work to cat- 
alogue each officer by his highest rank only, in order to avoid the labor 
and expense required in the repetition of names ; and it has been found the 
simpler way to regard the brevet rank as this higher rank, since the officer 
was habitually known by his brevet title. The list under the head of 
" Regular Army and Staff Corps " follows strictly the method adopted in 
Heitman's semi-official "Historical Register of the United States Army," 
in classifying the two together, as receiving their commissions from the 
national, not State, authority. Heitman also includes, for the same reason, 
all general officers by brevet or otherwise ; and though these are here com- 
prised in a separate list, yet the name of each is given on the "Regular 
Army" list, — where many, following Heitman, would look for them, — 
a reference to the other list being, however, given. 

It will be found that these lists of officers do not, except in the case of 
general officers, purport to give the military history of the officer, but only 
the bare military record ; and even this in many cases comprises only his 
career as an officer, not as a private, if previously so serving. The deficiencj^ 
is due wholly to the limited means at my command. It was hoped at first to 
include the whole service in every case, and this was done wherever the pre- 
vious career as enlisted man was easily accessible ; but it soon proved that 
this career had often occurred in a different regiment, perhaps in another 
State, and was often complicated and obscured by dating back the officer's 
commission. The attempt was therefore abandoned, except where the facts 
were ready at hand. The same rule was adopted in giving details of death, 
where occurring since the war. They were printed wherever they came to 
hand readily, not otherwise. The whole aim of the book was not to pre- 
sent a work of ideal completeness — for this would have required twice the 
time and more than twice the money — but to give as much as could be 
given within the scanty limitations prescribed and to make it reasonably 
accurate. Had the compiler possessed a fortune of his own to spend upon 



INTRODUCTION. Xlll 



it, or had others recognized its value by donations of money, like the late 
Dr. Francis M. Weld, it would have been a very different book. If it be 
said that the Legislature, if properly approached, would doubtless have 
spent more liberally upon it, it is enough to say that it took the compiler 
two years of urging to get the original appropriation of five hundred dol- 
lars a year for "necessary expenses" enlarged to fifteen hundred dollars, 
— when he had asked for twenty-five hundred dollars, — and that he could 
only obtain even this increase by pledging himself to ask for nothing more 
thereafter. This pittance of fifteen hundred dollars was all that he had 
to expend — apart from his own modest salary — for clerk hire, books, 
stationery, postage, room rent, fuel and travelling expei <?es. As a matter 
of fact, his actual expenses have considerably exceeded, every year, what 
he received under that head from the State. ' 

It is a matter greatly regretted by the present compiler that it is not 
in his power to complete this work, as it should be completed, by an 
alphabetical list of enlisted men and sailors, with their records, to corre- 
spond to those here given of officers. He hopeyi at first to do this, but 
soon finding that it would require means fully three times as great as those 
at his command, he was obliged to abandon it and to rest in the knowledge 
that if he began with the officers, the enlisted men would inevitably follow. 
There was the added difficulty that the full records at Washington were 
not, until this year, accessible, and that the State archives are not yet, in 
the opinion of the Adjutant-General, in condition for such a work ; while 
as to the sailors, it is as yet wholly out of the question. The State his- 
torian has, however, urged the matter upon two successive governors, — 
being, as he thinks, the first person to propose it, — and the proposition 
has been made, in this year's gubernatorial message, to make to this present 
work this necessary addition. It will be a vast and costly undertaking, 
— the compiling of this farther work, the preparation of more than one 
hundred thousand records. It will probably occupy three volumes, each 
larger than these ; leaving the sailors still outside the enumeration. Yet it 
should, in the present compiler's opinion, be carried through, although, 
he trusts, in other hands than his. It will be greatly facilitated by an 
alphabetical card list which Adjutant-General Dalton has, with admirable 
foresight, caused to be prepared, and which gives the name and regiment 
of each enlisted man, but without the dates of service. 



Xiv INTRODUCTION. 



For those who reu^ the narrative portion of this book the fact must 
be constantly recognized that the publication of that monumental work, 
the "Official War Records," 1 has practically superseded most other sources 
of authority. All war history must gradually be rewritten in its light. 
This is not because the statements in its reports, letters and dispatches are 
always correct. They are, on the other hand, very often erroneous and 
contradictory. Their invaluable merit is that they represent, with absolute 
correctness, what the leading participants at each moment knew, or thought 
they knew, or wished to have it supposed that they knew ; we learn for 
the first time precisely what orders they received, and how they interpreted 
them. The result is in many instances not merely a wholly new aspect of 
things, the making or marring of reputations, the piercing of bubbles. 
There also results an entire superseding of whole shelves of early volumes, 
historical or biographical, which are henceforth valuable only for a few 
anecdotes or personal reminiscences. 

The narrative rests solely on the responsibility of the State historian, 
and he has tried to be true to that duty. He was placed in his position not 
to flatter or apologize, not to produce a perfectly colorless tale, avoiding all 
vexed questions, but simply to tell the truth as he could best ascertain it, 
and thus anticipate, so far as he could, the dispassionate judgment of pos- 
terity. To do this must necessarily be to incur some criticism, though 
not so severe, it is hoped, as that suggested by the Duke of Wellington, 
meditating on his own memoirs. "I should like to speak the truth," he 
remarked, "but if I do I shall be torn in pieces." It is hoped that no 
result like this will follow ; but it is well to remember how absolutely 
impossible it is for any human being to assign to every corps and regiment 
and company precisely the shade of prominence which belongs to it in the 
eyes of every survivor. Quite as hard is it to accord with the views of 
each one as to the comparative rank of different commanders. When we 
think of the directly antagonistic opinions which still prevail in regard to 
such conspicuous names as those of McClellan, Hooker, and even Grant 
himself, it is plainly out of the question to satisfy all. In the admirable 
"War Book" of the Century Company it is found impossible to treat 
properly so simple an affair as the battle of Shiloh without having four 

1 It will be so cited in this volume, as is already done in several simitar works. The full title is aneed- 
lessly cumbrous one — War of the Rebellion : Official Records of the Uuion and Confederate Armies. 



INTRODUCTION. XV 



separate statements, — two from each side of the contest, — each of these 
four differing in its whole attitude from each of the others. Indeed, it was 
once seriously proposed before the military committee of the Massachusetts 
Legislature to have four military historians instead of one. This project 
not prevailing, the whole responsibility was thrown upon the present offi- 
cial, and he can only say that he has done the best he could. Among 
many defects, or even errors of detail, he believes that there will be recog- 
nized, sooner or later, in his narrative a sincere and simple desire to tell 
the truth. 



Preliminary Narrative. 



[1] 



Preliminary Narrative. 



I. THE OUTBREAK OF THE "WAR. 

The outbreak of the Civil War found Massachusetts, and the Eastern 
States generally, not only in an unarmed but in a very unwarlike condition. 
The old outdoor habits of a rural community — riding, hunting and outdoor 
adventure — had almost passed away, while the modern substitutes in the 
way of physical exercise were only just being introduced. The intercol- 
legiate athletic contests had just begun, there had been two or three rowing 
matches, no football games ; it was rarely that villages met to compete at 
base ball. The militia had been until within a few years at a low ebb ; it 
had indeed been lately organized into regiments, but these larger organiza- 
tions were still almost nominal. As a rule, the higher an officer, the less 
his military knowledge, — the major usually knew less than the captain, the 
colonel less than the major, the brigadier-general still less, and the major- 
general sometimes less than any of them. The higher officers were often 
appointed on merely political grounds, or because they would entertain the 
others at their houses. Stories were rife as to the blunders of these officers, 
of their marching the regiment up a high wall before they could remember 
how to stop them, or of their bewildering their command by the order (sug- 
gested by a mischievous adjutant) " Two or three paces backward, march ! " 
Even such as it was, the militia furnished the nucleus of the Massachusetts 
contingent, largely filled the roster of its early officers, and, by the prompt- 
ness of its three months' service, did much for the actual saving of the nation. 
Some of the regiments were ordered out three successive times and responded 
promptly every time. But it must not be for a moment supposed that the 
State militia of 1861 resembled at all in order and efficiency the highly 
organized militia of to-day ; and the more flattering the titles of its officers 
the less prepared they usually were to assume any responsibility requiring 
military knowledge. Without the line officers of the Massachusetts militia 



NARRATIVE. 



the State could not have met as it did the summons to the three months' ser- 
vice ; but its general officers were often an embarrassment. 

It must also be remembered that the Northern mind, generally shrinking 
from all belief in a coming war, had delayed serious action long after active 
preparations had begun at the South. Young men coming from that region 
were amazed, during the winter of 1860-61, to find their Northern acquaint- 
ances employing or amusing themselves as usual, while at the South every- 
body was drilling. All the events in Kansas had not really opened men's 
eyes. Both sides, moreover, strangely underrated their opponents. At the 
South, relying on their own more active outdoor habits, men believed that 
one Southerner was a match for three Yankees ; while at the North the 
reasoning, though proceeding from a different point, reached the same con- 
clusion. " Modern war," we reasoned, " is a matter not of individual hand- 
to-hand contest, but of machinery, of organization, of inventive skill, of 
capital, of material resources." In all these things we felt that we had the 
advantage. We did not allow for the effect of necessity in creating these 
very resources, nor for the fact that adversity was to call out in the South 
more important inventions and more triumphs of organizing skill than its 
years of" prosperity had ever claimed. The institution of slavery itself, by 
giving immense supplies of crude labor for fortifications, by supporting 
families and by educating the habit of command, was doubtless a power in 
the hands of the South, until we turned it against them by arming the 
blacks. And, again, Northern men overlooked the enormous difference 
between offensive and defensive war, especially in a contest spreading over 
so vast an extent of rough and sparsely settled country. 

There was thus a general impulse, born partly of desire, to make light of 
the extent and difficulty of the contest. 1 It is remembered that a very able 
man in Boston, Dr. Samuel Cabot, who had aided largely in sending rifles to 
Kansas, said once, in speaking of a possible war between the Northern and 

1 See Comte de Paris, Civil War in America (Translation, 1, 160) : " Would it be a military promenade, 
or a war of conquest ? No one was able to predict ; but in the North as wel 1 as in the South the impression 
was universal that the war would not be of long duration, and that the first encounters would settle the 
question ; nobody believed that the volunteers summoned by Mr. Lincoln to serve for three years, or 
during the war, would see their terms of enlistment expire amid the din of battle ; neither party had as 
yet formed an idea of the sacrifices its opponent was capable of making." For the over-confidence of the 
Confederates, see De Leon, Four Years in Rebel Capitals, p. 135. " Not one in three looked facts in the 
face." (De Leon, p. 32.) The war was " only a campaign, and not to last six months " (De Leon, 27, 
175.) See the similar opinions expressed by Coombs and Benjamin, in 1861 , in Century Magazine (October, 
1889, p. 950) . But Gen. J. E. B. Stuart held a different opinion. (Eggleston's A Rebel's Recollections.) 



THE WAR GOVERNOR. 



Southern States, " It would not last six months ; " while, on the other hand, 
one of the best of the Massachusetts militia officers, who went out as adjutant 
of General Devens's battalion at the very beginning, and afterwards entered 
the regular army, said, after the attack on Sumter, ' ' I would rather have 
England and France together upon us than this." Captain Goodhue was 
right ; war with England and France might have led to the capture or burn- 
ing of a few cities, but the pressure of the civilized world would have soon 
settled it by diplomacy, at a cost of money and life incomparably less than 
that of the contest which was now impending. As it was, the material cost 
of the war was best summed up by Gen. W. T. Sherman, who said, at Port- 
land, Oregon (July 3, 1890), "I do believe, as I believe in Him who rules 
above us all, that this country spent one thousand million dollars and one 
hundred thousand lives to teach you the art of war." x 

n. THE WAR GOVERNOR. 

On Jan. 5, 1861, John Albion Andrew was inaugurated as governor of 
Massachusetts, having been chosen to that office during the previous autumn, 
rather through a popular impulse than by any plans of political managers ; 
and having received the largest popular vote given up to that time to any 
Massachusetts governor. He stood before the people a figure of unique 
appearance and bearing, — short, stout, blue-eyed, with closely curling brown 
hair, smooth cheeks, and a general effect that was feminine, though very 
sturdily so. He entered on his duties with universal popular confidence as 
to his intentions, but absolutely untried as to large executive duties. His 
personal habits were pacific and even sedentary ; he had no taste for any 
pageantry, least of all for that of war ; yet in his very inaugural address he 
showed that he had grasped the situation of the country, and from that day 
he was, emphatically and thoroughly, the war governor. 

Governor Andrew was frank, outspoken, with no concealments and little 
solicitude for any reserve in others. It was said at the State House that his 
predecessors had been much given to private and confidential interviews ; 
but that he went to the other extreme. Everything was aboveboard; he 
talked as freely among his clerks and visitors as in the most secluded privacy. 
In preliminary negotiations, sometimes delicate and difficult, about the form- 

i Speech, etc., p. 34. 



NARRATIVE. 



ing of regiments, the selection of officers, the distribution of supplies, it 
was almost impossible to have a word of confidential intercourse with him. 
It was also difficult to hold him to a point ; he liked to talk over his own 
plans and to read aloud the letters he had just written ; and, as his style was 
rather florid and he amplified a good deal, these digressions took much 
precious time. Moreover, he was thin-skinned, and felt keenly any personal 
attack ; and when he met with a thoroughly unscrupulous and tormenting 
opponent it was not hard to keep him vexed and irritated, in spite of the 
unselfish nobleness of his aims. 

The selection of officers was of course the most perplexing part of his 
military work, and was that in which he made most mistakes, these arising 
almost wholly from his virtues. He said truly of himself that he had never 
despised any man because he was poor, because he was ignorant or because 
he was black ; but there was always a chance that he might overrate a man 
for one or the other of these reasons. He began, as all war governors did, 
with a natural prejudice in favor of regular army men and those who had 
served in foreign armies ; and where men had these recommendations, the 
fact that they had been the object of attack or criticism on other grounds 
told rather in their favor ; unless they had taken positively pro-slavery 
positions or led mobs against abolitionists or negroes , — he drew the line 
there. 

No one can now appreciate how difficult it was, after a prolonged period 
of peace, to look around upon the community and say of this man or that 
"He would make a good military officer." Men did not know this in regard 
to themselves. No man could feel humbler about this process of selection 
than Governor Andrew. He said once, " It seems very absurd that I, who 
am a man of peace and always hated soldiering, should be the man to choose 
these officers ; but Providence has put this duty upon me, and I shall do it 
as best I can." He was liable, as are most of us, to be misled by an imposing 
appearance, a commanding manner, and to underrate the obscurer virtues. 
He was over-influenced at times by trivial or temporary considerations, as 
when he once gave it as his reason for proposing to give one civilian a 
colonelcy, that this person had wished for one before, and had behaved very 
well under disappointment. It is now known, on the other hand, that the 
present head of the American army, Major-General Miles, was set aside 
by Governor Andrew at the last moment as too young for the command of 



THE WAR GOVERNOR. 



a company which he had raised at his own expense ; although the governor 
of New York had afterwards the discernment, after one or two battles, to 
take this young officer from his lieutenancy and make him colonel of a 
regiment. 1 He had also the tendency, common to strong-willed men, to 
stick to an appointment, even when an obvious mistake. He once said of 
an officer of foreign birth, " He is the best field officer who ever went from 
Massachusetts." There being rumors of insubordination and inefficiency in 
regard to this officer, Governor Andrew was asked, a month or so later, if 
he still held to the same opinion. " I will go further now," he said, striking 
the table with his hand ; "I will say that he is worth all the other field 
officers who have left Massachusetts, put together." Yet the career of this 
particular person was by no means a success, and he left the service early. 2 
On the other hand, his dislikes were as warm and impetuous as his likings, 
and he could not always be trusted to exercise patience or justice in dealing 
with any one who had forfeited his good opinion. 3 

On the evening of the very day on which Governor Andrew's inaugural 
address was delivered (Jan. 5, 1861) he sent confidential messengers to the 
governors of the New England States, urging military preparation on the 
part of all. Col. Albert G. Browne, afterwards the governor's military 
secretary, was sent to the governors of Maine and New Hampshire ; Colonel 
Wardrop, commander of the 3d Mass. Volunteer Militia, was sent to 
Vermont, and others to Rhode Island and Connecticut. The military 
historians of Maine and New Hampshire make no reference to this communi- 
cation ; and it is evident that in "Vermont it led only to some correspondence 
but to " little open or actual preparation for fighting." 4 

The first direct and overt step taken by Governor Andrew was the 
apparently mild one of causing a salute to be fired on Jan. 8, 186 1, 5 in com- 
memoration of the battle of New Orleans, this being at the suggestion of the 
Hon. Charles Francis Adams. The next step took place on January 16, 6 
when an order was issued requiring each company commander in a militia 
regiment to revise his muster roll, to ascertain whether any of the members 



» McClure's Magazine, November, 1895, p. 64. 2 Compare Walcott's 21st Mass., p. 133. 

3 Compare Documents in the Case of Maj. Andrew Washburn, late of the 14th Mass. Volunteers, 2d 
ed., Boston, 1862. This pamphlet includes the remarkable letter of resignation of Col. William B. Greene, 
14th Mass. Infantry (1st Heavy Artillery), resenting alleged injustice to his officers. 

4 Benedict's Vermont in the Civil War, p. 7. 6 General Order No. 2, Headquarters, Boston. 
• G. O. No. 4, Headquarters, Boston (Schouler, I, 20). 



8 NARRATIVE. 



would be, "from age, physical defect, business or family cares, unable or 
indisposed to respond at once to the orders of the commander-in-chief," in 
order that they might be " forthwith discharged, so that their places may be 
filled by men ready for any public emergency which may arise, whenever 
called upon. This once done, no discharge could be granted unless for 
cause satisfactory to the commander-in-chief." From the moment when this 
order was issued Massachusetts had begun to be placed on a war footing. 

The time for actual fighting, however, soon came. It is said that on 
April 12, 1861, the Senate of Ohio was m session and was vainly trying, 
amid suppressed excitement, to settle down to its ordinary routine. Sud- 
denly a senator came hastily in from the lobby, and, catching the chairman's 
eye, exclaimed, " Mr. President, the telegraph announces that the seces- 
sionists are bombarding Fort Sumter." There was a moment's hush, which 
was broken by a woman's shrill voice from the spectators' seats, crying 
' ' Glory to God." ' ' It startled every one," says a spectator, ' ' almost as if the 
enemy were in the midst." 1 The scene was Ohio, but the voice was a voice 
from Massachusetts, for the speaker was Abby Kelly Foster of Worcester, 
one of the most daring and self-devoted of the early abolitionists, a woman 
whose tones had always a peculiar and thrilling quality, as of one crying in 
the wilderness. She now uttered the impulse of many who saw at a glance 
that the death struggle between freedom and slavery had come. The next 
day the Union flag fluttered over myriads of roofs in the great Northern 
cities, and political differences appeared annihilated. In Massachusetts, 
whatever had looked like pro-slavery sympathy in the great Democratic 
party seemed for the moment to vanish, as by magic, and appeared after- 
wards, if at all, in the form of too suspicious a criticism. 



III. THE FIRST VOLUNTEER COMPANY. 

The first company newly organized for the Civil War in Massachusetts 
and probably in the Northern States was that formed in Cambridge, Mass., 
by Capt. (afterwards colonel) James P. Richardson, the call for which com- 
pany appeared in the Cambridge Chronicle, Jan. 5, 1861 (the very day of the 
new governor's inauguration), and in posters of the same date. The call 

1 Gen. Jacob D. Cox, in Battles and Leaders of the Civil War (Century War Book), I, 85. 



THE FIRST VOLUNTEER COMPANY. 



was as follows, and is given here as the first, 1 and as forming the precursor 
for many others in other places ; and for the same reason the subsequent 
proceedings are given more fully than in the case of any later company. 

"The undersigned proposes to organize a company of volunteers to 
tender their services to our common country, and to do what they can to 
maintain the integrity of the Union and the glory of our flag. Any citizen 
of good moral character and sound in body, who wishes to join the corps, 
will please call at my office, Main Street, Cambridgeport." Signed, "J. P. 
Kichardson." 2 

The signer of this call was a lawyer in Cambridge and captain of the 
" Wide Awakes," a political organization. It is one of the many ties con- 
necting this new contest with the Revolutionary traditions that his great- 
grandfather, Moses Richardson, was killed in one of the opening battles 
of the American Revolution. 

" At the same time," writes he, " I hung a flag from my office window 
and opened a book for the signatures of recruits. In a few days I had a roll 
of over sixty names, most of them young men belonging to the Cambridge 
fire department." He then hired a hall and devoted his evenings to the 
drilling of recruits. But it illustrates the curious conditions of mind at that 
time that the project met with derision instead of encouragement. " In the 

i The next in date appears to have been that issued by Capt. Allan Rutherford of New York City, who 
called a meeting at the Mercer House, for a similar purpose, Jan. 11, 1861. (Townsend's Honors of the 
Empire State in the War of the Rebellion, p. 89.) 

2 The following is a copy of the enlistment list and its various endorsements of approval : — 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

We, whose names are hereunto affixed, do severally consent, and by our signatures hereunto made do 
agree, to be enrolled into a company of volunteer militia, to be raised in the city of Cambridge and 
vicinity, subject to orders of the commander-in-chief; and, in consideration of arms and equipments to 
be furnished us by the Commonwealth, we do hereby agree to serve for the period of five years, unless 
sooner discharged agreeably to law. 

[Here followed the names.] 

City of Cambridge, March 19, 1861. 
I hereby signify my approval of the organization of the within company of volunteer militia, and my 

desire that the same may be sanctioned by the commander-in-chief. 

Jas. D. Green, Mayor. 

Executive Department, April 5, 1861. 
The Adjutant-General will issue the proper orders for the organization of a company under this petition. 

J. A. Andrew, Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 

Headquarters, Boston, April 9, 1861. 
I hereby certify that the within names are a correct copy of the original petition. 

Wm. Schouler, Adjutant-General. 



10 NARRATIVE. 



mean time," he writes, " I had to endure a fire of raillery and sarcasm from 
nearly every one I met as I walked the streets between my house and my 
office. Squibs were published in the local paper, making fun of my warlike 
preparations, and every would-be wit seemed to think it the best joke of the 
season. I went to Gov. John A. Andrew, however, and told him what I 
was doing, and tendered him our services as soon as they should be needed. 
The governor approved my action, and promised to call upon me when the 
time came for action." 

When the President's call for seventy-five thousand men was issued, and 
six militia regiments were ordered out from Massachusetts, it was the hope 
of Captain Richardson and his company that they would be added to one 
of these regiments. The following is the description given by Captain 
Richardson : "It was on the 16th of April, 1861. I had been in court all 
day. It was a cold, drizzling day, and at night it rained hard. As I sat in 
my office, nearly all the members of my company came in, full of excitement, 
to inquire if I had received orders to march, and were bitterly disappointed 
when I told them I had not. They hung around, grumbling, until near ten 
o'clock, gradually dropping off till there were only some half dozen left. I 
was telling them that the governor had promised that we should have the 
first chance, when a tall man, in a rubber overcoat and a sou'wester hat, 
dripping with rain, came in and inquired for Captain Richardson. Every 
face turned to me, every hand pointed, and every voice shouted, ' There he 
is.' He took a large, official-looking paper from his pocket, and handed it 
to me. I opened and read it. It was an order from the governor to appear 
forthwith at the State House in Boston, with my company for service. 
Holding it above my head, I shouted, ' Here it is, boys ! Go down to 
Pike's stable and get a horse apiece, and notify every member of the com- 
pany to be here at my office by daylight to-morrow morning.'" 

The company marched from its temporary quarters to Boston early in 
the morning of April 17, 1 and was there organized as a company of State 
militia belonging to the 5th Regiment, Col. S. C. Lawrence (a Middlesex 
County regiment), but temporarily to be assigned to the 3d Regiment (Col. 



1 Captain Richardson writes : "As we passed along, we received many tokens of regard from citizens. 
Dr. Estes Howe placed a one-hundred-dollar bill in my hand, to be used for the benefit of the company. 
One man gave me a dilapidated white kid glove, saying, • The fingers will make the very best kind of cots, 
if you should get a wound in the finger.' " (MS. letter.) 



THE FIRST VOLUNTEER COMPANY. 11 

D. W. Wardrop), which wa8 mainly from Plymouth County. 1 It had 
ninety-seven members, no other company in the regiment having more than 
seventy-eight, and one having but twenty-four members. Officers were 
selected in the manner usual for militia companies, Colonel Lawrence presid- 
ing at the election. James P. Richardson was chosen captain, Samuel E. 
Chamberlain first lieutenant, Edwin F. Richardson second, John Kinnear 
third and Francis M. Doble fourth lieutenant. This was according to the 
old " Scott" system, but it is a satisfaction to know that when, under the 
new (Hardee) system, the number of lieutenants was cut down to two, both 
Messrs. Kinnear and Doble continued with the company as sergeants, and 
served during the three months.. It was especially manly in Mr. Kinnear, 
whose name had stood first on the enlistment paper. First Lieutenant' 
(afterwards general) Chamberlain was the only member of the company who 
had seen military service, — in the Mexican war, — and he was naturally 
placed next to the highest in command. He had been a member both of the 
police force and the fire department of Cambridge, 2 and had much influence 
and authority among his fellow-recruits. Of the whole number of members 
in this pioneer company (ninety-seven) all but two re-enlisted at the end of 
the three months' service, twenty-seven received commissions in other regi- 
ments and twenty-one died in the service. 3 

These facts have been given thus at length, because this process of com- 
pany formation represented that which was soon going on all over the State, 
in some cases for three months' service, in others for three years. Even the 
regularly summoned militia companies had often more new recruits than old 
members ; but this company of Captain Richardson's appears to have been 
the only essentially new company among the Massachusetts three months' 
troops. The circumstances under which these were collectively called out 
will be presently stated. 

In the resolutions of the Massachusetts Legislature on the death of Gen. 
William Cogswell, it was assumed for him that he recruited the first com- 
pany in this State for the Civil War. 4 The facts in regard to the Cambridge 



1 Adjutant-General's report, January, 1862, pp. 9, 13. 

2 Manuscript letter from General Chamberlain, April 22, 1895. 

3 Paige's History of Cambridge, p. 433, note. 

4 " As a soldier he manifested a loyal and patriotic devotion to his country by raising the first volunteer 
company for the late war." Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography makes a similar statement: 
" In 1861 he raised the first company of volunteers for the national cause in Massachusetts." 



12 NARRATIVE. 



company seem to disprove this statement ; but, since that company did not 
serve three years, it may perhaps be true that General (then captain) Cogs- 
well's company was the first enlisted and serving for that whole period. 
It appears that this officer was one of twenty privates of the Salem Cadets 
who volunteered to escort Captain Devereux's company ("A" of 7th 
M. V. M.) to Boston on April 18, 1861, this company having been known 
both as the Salem Light Infantry and the Salem Zouaves ; and on his return- 
ing to Salem that night he determined to raise a company for himself, and 
began recruiting on April 20. l The company was named the Andrew Light 
Guard ; it went into camp at Camp Webb on Winter Island, Salem harbor, 
April 22 ; 2 on May 8 Governor Andrew requested Colonel (afterwards 
general) Gordon to receive it into the 2d Regiment, then forming; 3 and it 
reported May 14 with seventy-five men, Captain Abbott having, however, 
previously reported with a full company. 4 Supposing Captain Cogswell's 
to be the first company formed for the 2d Regiment, it could only have 
priority over Captain Richardson's by claiming that it was a < ' volunteer " 
company, and that of Richardson only a "volunteer militia" company. But 
the language of the original call shows clearly that this company was 
gathered expressly for the war for the Union and not for militia service 
within the State; and if it called itself in the enlistment roll a militia com- 
pany, it was because there was as yet no other way of getting into the ser- 
vice. It was certainly an added merit, if it enlisted actually in advance of 
any public national call. 

IV. THE THREE MONTHS' REGIMENTS. 

The first call made on Massachusetts for troops was by a telegraphic de- 
spatch from Senator Wilson, dated at Washington, April 15, requesting 
twenty companies to be sent to Washington and there mustered into service. 
During that day similar despatches were received by telegraph from the 
Secretary of War and the Adjutant-General, with formal requisitions for two 
militia regiments. Four regiments were accordingly called out, that, if 
necessary, strong companies might be detached from the weaker regiments, 
and so the maximum might be obtained. 5 Orders were accordingly issued to 

» Manuscript letter of Capt. J. P. Reynolds (Sept. 7, 1895). 

2 Quint's 2d Mass. Infantry, p. 12. 3 Gordon's Organization, etc., of 2d Regiment, pp. 11, 14. 

* Quint's 2d Mass. Infantry, List of Officers, etc. 5 Schouler, I, 50. 



THE THREE MONTHS' REGIMENTS. 13 

Colonel Jones of the 6th Regiment (at Lowell) , Colonel Packard of the 4th 
(at Quincy), Colonel Wardrop of the 3d (at New Bedford) and Colonel 
Munroe of the 8th (at Lynn), requiring them to muster their commands on 
Boston Common forthwith. 

The question which militia company arrived first in Boston is not wholly 
easy to settle. In the annual report of Adjutant-General Schouler (January, 
1862) it was expressly stated that the first to arrive were three from Marble- 
head (Cos. B, C, H, 8th Regiment), and that "they arrived at the Eastern 
depot at 9 a.m." 1 Six years later, in his History of Massachusetts in the 
Civil War, he modified the statement, saying that he was at the Eastern 
railway station when these companies arrived, and that the hour was ' < shortly 
after eight." 2 It is obvious that a considerable range of time is thus opened 
by this discrepancy as to hours ; and it is also noticeable that his testimony 
in 1862 was given a good deal nearer to the actual occurrences than that 
made in 1868. On the other hand, there is ample evidence that Co. E, 
4th Regiment Mass. Volunteer Militia, took the train at J3outh Abington 
at 7.13 a.m., April 16, 1861, due to arrive in Boston at' 8.13 a.m., and, 
as there was no delay or accident, it is fair to suppose that the train 
arrived on time. 3 If, therefore, the first statement of Adjutant-General 
Schouler was correct, Captain Allen's Abington company had distinct pre- 
cedence over the three Marblehead companies ; whereas, if the Adjutant- 
General's modified statement of 1868 is to be accepted, the matter is left 
more indefinite. As a matter of fact, the controversy is not of great im- 
portance, because many companies took the first trains on their respective 
railways, and were after that at the mercy of the time tables, over which 
they had no control. 

The essential point is that all the regiments responded ' ' forthwith " as 
required, on April 16, though in consequence of a severe storm the place of 
assemblage was changed to Faneuil Hall. In spite of the storm, crowds of 
men and women were gathered to receive the various troops, and followed 
them with zeal through the city. Some detached companies were also 
ordered out and were assigned to different regiments. A messenger sent to 
Captain Dike of Stoneham, whose company was to be transferred from the 



1 Adjutant-General's report, January, 1862, p. 8. 2 Schouler, I, 51. 

3 Manuscript letter from Maj. Charles F. Allen, late captain Co. E, 4th Regiment M. V. M., afterwards 
major 38th Mass. Infantry. 



14 NARRATIVE. 



7th Regiment to the 6th, reached him at 2 a.m. He said to the messenger, 
v ' Tell His Excellency that I shall be at the State House with my full com- 
pany by 11 o'clock to-day," and he was there. Captain Pratt of the 3d 
Battalion of Rifles was also assigned to the 6th, as was the company of 
Captain Sampson of Boston. Captain Pratt received his order late in the 
afternoon of the 16th, and was in Boston with his company early on the 17th. 
These were but examples of the promptness to be seen almost everywhere. 
The first regiment to leave the State was the 4th M. V. M. (Colonel 
Packard), which went by afternoon train (April 17) to Fall River, to take 
the steamer for New York and thence to Fortress Monroe. The 6th (Colonel 
Jones) left for Washington by rail, but at a later hour. The 3d (Colonel 
Wardrop) was embarked on the steamer Spalding for Fortress Monroe, but 
remained in the harbor till morning. The 8th 1 (Colonel Munroe) was delayed 
by the desire to attach to it other companies ; it was not ordered to proceed 
until April 18, and was then accompanied by Brig. -Gen. (afterwards major- 
general) B. F. Butler, the instructions from Washington having now been 
modified to include four regiments and a brigadier-general. This regiment 
went through Philadelphia, after being, like the 6th, warmly received in New 
York, it being the second regiment that had marched through that city in 
advance of all others, while two other regiments were on the sea for Fortress 
Monroe. 2 In addition, on April 19, Col. S. C. Lawrence of the 5th 
M. V. M. was ordered to report for duty, and five companies of the 7th 
M. V. M. were added to his command (B, E, F, G, H), one of which, how- 
ever (E), was disbanded for insubordination, and a new company (Captain 
Wardwell) substituted. Maj . A. F. Cook's company of light artillery was 
also attached to Colonel Lawrence's command. The 3d Battalion of Rifles 
of Worcester, Major (afterwards general) Devens, received its orders on 
April 20, and was in line on the afternoon of that day ; and was joined 
later (May 1) by Capt. Albert Dodd's company from Boston. This com- 
pleted the list of the three months' volunteers, whose statistics were as 
follows : — 



1 The 8th M. V. M. came mainly from Essex County; the 3d and 4th mainly from Norfolk, Plymouth 
and Bristol ; the 6th mainly from Middlesex, with one company from Boston and one from Worcester. 
* Schouler, I, 77. 



THE THREE MONTHS' REGIMENTS. 



15 



Statistics of the Three Months' Volunteers. 



Commissioned 
Officers. 



Enlisted Men. 



Total. 



Barnstable County, 
Berkshire " 
Bristol 

Essex " 

Franklin " 

Hampden " 

Hampshire " 
Middlesex " 
Norfolk 
Plymouth 
Suffolk 

"Worcester " 
Other States, . 
Residence not given, 
Totals, . 



3 
21 
71 



57 

21 
19 
27 
24 

1 



244 



6 

73 

192 

857 

1 

3 

2 

882 

391 

333 

325 

339 

56 

32 



3,492 



6 

76 

213 

928 

1 

3 

2 

939 

412 

352 

352 

363 

57 

32 



3,736 



When we stop to consider what an utterly peaceful community had been, 
until within a week or two, that which these regiments represented, it is 
impossible not to admire the promptness with which they took up arms. 
In the later fatigues of the war we looked back almost with wonder on the 
enthusiasm which had welcomed these early regiments. They had en- 
countered little danger, "and some of them had scarcely heard a shot fired in 
anger; yet Napoleon's veterans could hardly have been received with 
more reverence and gratitude. The instinct was just, for it was really these 
militia regiments, and such as these, which had saved the nation during 
that first period of peril. 

While the early recruiting was going hastily on in Massachusetts, there 
occurred striking cases of persons whose zeal urged them to the front, to 
give their aid at Washington. One of the most noticeable of these instances 



L6 NARRATIVE. 



was that of Charles Russell Lowell, Jr., afterwards well known as a general 
of cavalry, who, on hearing of the occurrences of April 19 in Baltimore, set 
forth alone by rail, made his way from Baltimore to Washington on foot, 
by circuitous routes and under various disguises, and in Washington aided 
in the preparations for defence, having filed his application for a commission 
as lieutenant in the regular army. He was also employed as a scout and as 
a semi-official agent for Massachusetts. Later in the war he died of wounds 
received at Cedar Creek, Va. 1 Another and an earlier instance was that of 
Dexter F. Parker of Worcester, a young mechanic of marked literary 
tastes, who had already at thirty years of age represented Worcester in 
both branches of the State Legislature, and who, when the call for troops 
was issued, enlisted in the Worcester Light Infantry, but went alone to 
Washington in advance, and was one of the few who aided in measures for 
its defence until his regiment, the 6th, arrived from its bloody march 
through Baltimore. He afterwards rose to be major of the 10th Mass. 
Infantry, and died after the amputation of an arm, which was rendered 
necessary by wounds received at Spotsylvania. 2 Such instances as these 
showed the spirit which then pervaded multitudes of young men in all 
occupations. 

If it be asked what circumstances enabled the State of Massachusetts to 
respond thus promptly in time of need, it must be attributed in part to 
the old revolutionary traditions of her people and in part also to the fore- 
sight of two successive governors ; that of Governor Banks, in developing 
the regimental organization of the militia, before regarded merely as a 
series of detached companies ; and that of Governor Andrew, in ordering 
first an accurate levy of the militia 3 and then recommending (against disap- 
proval and even derision) that the State should contract for overcoats, 
blankets, knapsacks and ball cartridges for two thousand troops. There 
were already in the armory of the State when the war broke out three 
thousand Springfield rifled muskets of the best pattern. Trivial as this 



1 See his memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 296. 

8 See his memoir in Marvin's Worcester in the War, p. 489. It is a curious illustration of the condition 
of discipline in the early part of the war that this officer's appointment as major from outside the regiment 
(Aug. 12, 1862) led to the resignation and dismissal of nine line officers who had served with it from the 
beginning, their cashiering or dismissal dating Nov. 25, 1862. (Adjutant-General's report, January, 1863, 
p. 127.) 

» G. 0. 4, Jan. 16, 1861. 



THE THREE MONTHS' REGIMENTS. 17 

provision now seems, it enabled Massachusetts to be first in the breach, and 
perhaps to save Washington. 

But the actual enlistment of soldiers was only one of the many ways in 
which the aroused public sentiment showed itself. Cheques and other gifts 
were received from individuals, for sums from ten thousand dollars down- 
ward, William Gray and Gardner Brewer each giving the former sum. The 
Boston banks offered to loan the State, without security, the sum of three 
million, six hundred thousand dollars for war purposes, and offered to the 
secretary of the treasury to take, with the banks of New York and Phila- 
delphia, their share of one hundred and fifty million dollars in treasury 
notes. Secretary Chase said that when the credit of the government needed 
the support of some great financial leader, he found it in Mr. Samuel 
Hooper of Boston, " to whom I am indebted," he said, " for more assistance 
than any other man in the country." He also said, "I sent the first 
treasury note that was ever signed to Mr. Edward Wallace of Salisbury, 
Mass., in recognition of his having been the first man in the country to offer 
a loan to the government without interest." 

Drs. George H. Lyman and Wm. J. Dale at once organized a medical 
department, which maintained its efficiency to the very end of the war. 1 
The former had for some time been studying for just such service, in antici- 
pation of war ; and the latter wrote thus : "On the sixteenth day of April, 
1861, I was called from my professional pursuits by Governor Andrew to 
assist Dr. George H. Lyman in furnishing medical supplies for the 6th 
Regiment, and I continued under direction of the governor to perform con- 
jointly with Dr. Lyman such duties as were incidental to a medical bureau 
until the 13th of June, 1861, when I was commissioned surgeon-general of 
Massachusetts, with the rank of colonel." 1 Many of the first physicians of 
Boston at the same time offered their services to attend gratuitously the 
families of soldiers. Lawyers agreed to take charge of the legal business 
of young lawyers who . might enlist. The Eev. W. H. Cudworth of East 
Boston, not content with offering his services as chaplain for the first three 
years' regiment, announced to his congregation that, if his services were 
not needed, he should devote his usual salary to the common cause, and 
that his organist and sexton would do the same ; he, moreover, advised 
that the money which had been raised for a new church should be devoted 

1 Schouler, I, 54. 



18 NARRATIVE. 



to the soldiers, and that they should be content with the old building until 
the war should be over. These things but feebly illustrate the outburst of 
patriotism inspired by the war. And when it is remembered that Massa- 
chusetts was represented, at this time, by Charles Sumner and Henry 
Wilson in the United States Senate, and by Charles Francis Adams at the 
Court of St. James, it may fairly be claimed that she. began the period of 
the great civil war in a becoming manner. 

The 6th Mass. Infantry, which has been called with propriety the 
State's one historic regiment, now demands a special consideration. This" 
organization had the undying honor of being the first regiment to reach 
Washington, fully organized and equipped, at the call of the President. It 
was brought together at Lowell on the 16th of April, the morning after the 
proclamation was issued, the officers of the regiment having previously held 
a meeting on Jan. 21, 1861, at the suggestion of Gen. B. F. Butler, and 
offered its services to the government. As gathered, the regiment included 
four companies from Lowell, two from Lawrence, one from Groton, one 
from Acton and one from Worcester. In Boston, which was reached at 
1 p.m., there were added a Boston company and a Stoneham company, 
making eleven in all, or about seven hundred men. These men were among 
the very first fruits of the enlistment, entering the service without a bounty ; 
in many cases wholly new to drill and discipline, untried even in the muster- 
field. Their heterogeneous uniform was characteristic of the period. Seven 
of the companies wore blue uniform coats, dark or light, sometimes with 
red trousers ; four companies wore gray, with buff or yellow trimmings. 1 
Some companies had two lieutenants, some had four; some had learned 
the old " Scott" drill, 2 others the " Hardee" tactics, then a novelty, after- 
wards universal. 

Passing through Boston, New York and Philadelphia, the regiment was 
received with enthusiasm, but in the last-named city, or just after leaving 
it, Col. Edward F. Jones, the commander, received intimation that the 
passage through Baltimore would be disputed. He accordingly went 
through the cars and personally issued an order saying that the regiment 
would march through Baltimore in column of sections, arms at will ; that 



1 Hanson's 6th Regiment, p. 20. 

2 For the early use of Scott's tactics, see Comte de Paris, Civil War, I, 273 ; England's Evolution of a 
Life, p. 144; Parker's 32d Mass., pp. 12, 29. Hardee was used for rifles only. 



THE THREE MONTHS' REGIMENTS. 19 

they would probably be insulted and perhaps attacked, but were not to 
fire unless at the order of their officers. 

The train of thirty-five cars reached the President Street station in 
Baltimore at " about 10 a.m.," according to Captain Follansbee, but accord- 
ing to Mayor Brown of that city, at 11 a.m. 1 This gentleman has always 
maintained that if the regiment had marched in a body through the city — 
which had been done the day before by an unarmed force from Pennsylvania, 
with a few regular troops — there would have been no serious trouble. It 
had been the intention of Colonel Jones to do this ; and twenty rounds of 
ball cartridges had been issued to the regiment and rifles had been loaded 
and capped. But it was the practice at the President Street station to detach 
the through cars, on arrival, and have each drawn by four horses through 
the city to the Camden Street station, a distance of more than a mile ; 
and this practice, previously unknown to Colonel Jones, was followed at 
this time. The' effect was of course hopelessly to disintegrate the raw and 
untried regiment. About nine cars, containing seven companies, with 
i which was Colonel Jones, went through in safety, except that the last car, 
containing Co. K, was delayed by obstructions on the track and had some 
windows broken. These, with other obstacles, including, for instance, a 
heavy anchor, soon made the track absolutely impassable, and the gather- 
ing mob saw the four remaining companies, without their colonel, in a man- 
ner delivered into its hands. These companies were C, D, I, L, under 
Captains Follansbee, Hart, Pickering and Dike ; also the band, and an un- 
armed force from Pennsylvania, neither of which two bodies left the station. 
The four companies formed on President Street, numbering about two 
hundred and twenty men in all, under Captain Follansbee, and set out on 
their march. The mob crowded in upon them, throwing paving stones and 
other missiles. The troops increased their pace to double-quick; pistol 
shots were fired, and one soldier fell dead. Mayor Brown arrived on the 
scene, asked Captain Follansbee to discontinue the double-quick, and said 
to him, "You must defend yourselves." He then placed himself by the 
captain's side and marched about a third of a mile, as he states, with the 
troops, which occasionally fired irregularly. After a time, Marshal Kane 
with a body of policemen (less than fifty) came up on the run and placed 



1 Hanson's 6th Regiment, p. 40 ; Brown's Baltimore and the 19th of April, p. 44. 



20 NARRATIVE. 



themselves in the rear of the troops, after which there was little disorder. 
The four companies on reaching the Camden Street station were placed in 
the cars, the blinds were closed by order of Colonel Jones, and the regi- 
ment about 1 p.m. went on to "Washington, being delayed, while still near 
Baltimore, by obstructions on the track. 

As a result of the day, four Massachusetts soldiers were killed by the 
mob: Addison O. Whitney of Lowell (born in Waldo, Me.), Luther C. 
Ladd of Lowell (born in Alexandria, N. H.), Charles A. Taylor (of un- 
known residence but enlisted in Boston), all belonging to Co. D, and Sum- 
ner H. Needham of Lawrence (born in Bethel, Me.), a member of Co. C. 
It is a curious fact that, while the bodies of the three other soldiers were 
brought home with honor and buried with municipal services in Lowell 
and Lawrence, that of Taylor was buried in an unknown grave in Balti- 
more, he being taken for a civilian, because of the absence of uniform. 
His loss was not even known until his overcoat was forwarded to the cap- 
tain of his company by one who saw him fall. "No trace of his family 
or friends has ever been discovered . . . though a box was received 
from Boston a short time after the regiment left Baltimore." 1 So lately 
as July 21, 1894, the usually accurate Boston Transcript stated that only 
three Massachusetts men fell at Baltimore. Thirty-six were wounded, in- 
cluding Captain Dike 6f*Stoneham, who was severely wounded in the thigh, 
was taken in and secreted in a hotel and was supposed to have been killed, 
and Lieutenants Lynde and Kowe, all of Co. L. The band was sent back 
to Boston and the unarmed Pennsylvania force to Philadelphia. Twelve 
of the Baltimore men were killed. War was fairly inaugurated by the 
shedding of blood, a thing which had not occurred during the contest at 
Fort Sumter. 2 

The 6th Mass. was unquestionably the first Union regiment to reach 
Washington, armed and equipped. It had, however, been preceded by a 
force from Pennsylvania, comprising five militia companies, mustering four 

» Hanson's 6th Regiment, p. 48. Governor Andrew ordered the bodies brought " tenderly." 
2 The best and most careful account of the whole affair at Baltimore is that entitled Baltimore 
and the 19th of April, 1861, by George Wm. Brown, chief judge of the supreme bench of Baltimore and 
mayor of the city in 1861. Colonel Jones's report may be found in Official War Records, I, 7, and in 
Adjutant-General Schouler's report for January, 1862; it is unexceptionable in tone, but is limited in 
value by the fact that he was not with the companies assailed on the march, and had to rely on hearsay. 
A modest and manly letter from Captain Dike may be found in Brown, p. 53, and one from Captain 
Follansbee in Hanson's 6th Mass., p. 40. 



THE ROUTE THROUGH ANNAPOLIS. 21 

or five hundred men, only thirty-four of whom were furnished with fire- 
arms. "Apart from these, there was not a charge of powder in the five 
companies," says the official historian of the Pennsylvania soldiers, adding 
that " great solicitude was felt by the State officials at Harrisburg for the 
safety of these unarmed and defenceless men." 1 

The Philadelphia men reached Washington at 7 p.m., April 18, and the 
Logan Guards sent in its morning report to the Adjutant-General on 
the next day. On the same day (April 19) the 6th Mass. Infantry arrived 
at 9 p.m. 

. Governor Andrew had sent to Washington, in advance of the 6th Mass. 
Infantry, Phineas S. Davis (afterwards killed, in 1864, as colonel of the 
39th Mass. Infantry) ; and under arrangements perfected by him, the regi- 
ment was quartered in the Senate Chamber, and was the main reliance for 
the defence of the city until the arrival of the later regiments, the 8th and 
5th, with the 7th New York, by way of Annapolis. It is well to record 
here that in the following July, after the battle of Bull Run, when the term 
of the 6th had expired, it remained in service at the governor's request, on 
his assurance that the Capitol was still in danger and not a regiment could 
be spared. A vote of thanks for this service was passed by the National 
House of Representatives. But it was a finer compliment when the anxious 
Lincoln said to the wounded soldiers of the 6th Mass. at Washington : "I 
begin to believe that there is no North. The 7th Regiment is a myth. 
Rhode Island is a myth. You are the only reality." 2 

V. THE ROUTE THROUGH ANNAPOLIS. 

Next to the early service of the 6th M. V. M., the most conspicuous was 
that of the 8th M. V. M. in its march to Washington via Annapolis. 

The circumstances of this advance were at first greatly misapprehended, 

1 Bates, History of Pennsylvania Volunteers, I, 6. The companies were the Logan Guards (to which 
the thirty-four armed men belonged), the Allen Guards, the Washington Artillery, the National Light In- 
fantry and the Ringgold Artillery. The latter had been expressly required to leave its field pieces and 
equipments behind at Harrisburg, but the men carried their sabres. It does not appear that any of these 
except the thirty-four armed men of the Logan Guards were uniformed Arms, ammunition and equipments 
were furnished them in Washington. (Bates, I, 7.) The whole number in the lists of the five companies 
as given by Bates is four hundred and eighty-two ; but the vote of thanks passed by Congress, July 22, 
1861, calls them "the five hundred and thirty soldiers from Pennsylvania who passed through the mob of 
Baltimore." (Bates, I, pp. 7-12.) It is probable that the framer of this resolution mistakenly included 
in his count the regular troops from the 4th Artillery, under Lieutenant Pemberton, who to the number of 
forty or fifty accompanied the Pennsylvania men only as far as Fort McHenry. (Bates, I, 5.) 

2 Nicolay and Hay, IV, 153. , 



22 NARRATIVE. 



but have now been put in a clear light, like so many other things, by 
the publication in Official War Records of the original letters and tele- 
graphic despatches which preceded. The 6th Mass. was attacked in Balti- 
more, as has been said, on April 19. On that same day Messrs. John 
Edgar Thomson and Samuel M. Felton, presidents respectively of the 
Pennsylvania Central and the Philadelphia & Baltimore railroads, tele- 
graphed to the Secretary of War from Philadelphia, saying that they were 
informed that it was impracticable to send more troops through Baltimore, 
and adding, ' ' Shall we send them through Annapolis ? " l 

No reply was received that day ; but that night a consultation was held 
in Philadelphia at the house of Major-General Patterson, commanding 
the department of Washington, and then second in command to General 
Scott only. Mr. Felton, Mr. Thomson, Governor Curtin and the mayor of 
Philadelphia were present. They agreed on the desirableness of the plan ; 
and, as no answer had yet come from Washington, and General Butler had 
meantime arrived in Philadelphia with the 8th Mass., it was decided to call 
his attention to the matter. General Patterson sent a message by Mr. 
Felton to General Butler to the effect that " he most urgently advised that 
he should go to Annapolis," and Captain (afterwards admiral) Dupont 
called with Mr. Felton on General Butler, strongly advising him to take 
this action. After some opposition, he yielded ; and Colonel Lefferts, who 
arrived with the 7th New York Regiment, after some similar opposition, 
finally yielded also, first telegraphing to the War Department for author- 
ity, as was proper. 2 

All the events of the period were confused by the inflated atmosphere 
that prevailed, and this extended to the author of Massachusetts in the 
Rebellion (P. C. Headley), who thus sums up the events: "At dead of 
night, with the rapidity of a strong mind, stimulated to its quickest thought 
by the rush of events, he [General Butler] made out in writing his plan of 
operations ; " this plan being one in reality thought out two months before 
by a modest railway president, foreseeing the impending troubles. 3 



» ( Official War Records, II, 578. 

2 Narrative of S. M. Felton, Schouler, I, 101. Official Records, II, 582. The phrases used in the 
despatch of Colonel Lefferts were : " Will you give orders to despatch troops via Annapolis to-day ? . . . 
We think this decidedly best." This disposes of the charge made at the time, in Massachusetts at least, 
that Colonel Lefferts shrank from the enterprise and General Butler did not. * 

3 Letter of J. M. Forbes, Schouler, I, 132. 



THE ROUTE THROUGH ANNAPOLIS. 23 

It is a curious fact, but characteristic of the crude enthusiasm of those 
early days of preparation, that the railway president was not more com- 
pletely ignored by the Massachusetts soldiers than by their comrades from 
New York, although the transfer of the honor was in a different direction. 
All the glory of the enterprise heaped by Massachusetts on General Butler 
was with equal unanimity and with quite as much- reason attributed to 
Colonel Lefferts. In the spirited narrative of the 7th Regiment's march, 
written by Fitz James O'Brien for the New York Times, he says : " The 
secret of this forced march, as well as an unexpected descent on Annapolis, 
was the result of Colonel Lefferts' judgment, which has since been sus- 
tained by events. . . . The fact that since then all the Northern troops have 
passed through the line that we thus opened is a sufficient comment on the 
admirable judgment that decided the movement." 1 O'Brien was not cor- 
rect in attributing the action to the "judgment of Colonel Lefferts;" for 
it had been virtually decided upon by General Patterson, General Cadwal- 
lader, Admiral Dupont, the mayor of Philadelphia and the two railroad 
presidents ; but the prompt and soldierly action of Colonel Lefferts in tele- 
graphing a recommendation of the plan to the War Department — a thing 
which General Butler should have done, but omitted — doubtless had its 
part in determining the action of that department. 

Be this as it may, the next morning (April 20) brought a positive 
order from Major^General Scott, in the name of the President, to send all 
troops b} r way of Annapolis, 2 and brought also a despatch from Adjutant- 
General Thomas to General Patterson to the same effect, this being in 
answer to the request of Colonel Lefferts for orders. 3 General Patterson 
at once communicated the instructions to General Butler, and "gave 
directions," as he expressly says, "for the 8th Mass. and 7th New York 
infantries to go via Annapolis to Washington." 4 After this there was, of 
course, no alternative, and either Butler or Lefferts would have been liable 
to court martial had he gone in any other way. The only reason why this 



1 Rebellion Record, I, (Doc.) 153. 

2 Official War Records, II, 584. General Scott said on that same day to President Lincoln, "March 
them around Baltimore and not through it." (Lincoln's letter to Governor Hicks, in Brown's Baltimore 
and the 19th of April, p. 62.) He suggested the Annapolis route to Governor Hicks personally on April 
21. (Brown, p. 72.) 

s Official War Records, II, 583. 

4 Official War Records, II, 585. Elsewhere General Patterson says with equal distinctness, " I had 
ordered General Butler to proceed to Annapolis " (Patterson's Shenandoah Campaign, p. 27). 



24 NARRATIVE. 



was not clearty understood at the time was that these successive steps were 
not made public, and that General Butler wrote at the time a letter to 
Governor Andrew x in which he omitted all reference either to Mr. Felton 
as the originator of the plan or to the express orders finally received. 

Leaving Philadelphia about 3 p.m. on April 20, the 8th Mass. reached 
Perryville about 6 p.m., and found a steamer quietly awaiting it, as 
arranged by Mr. Felton. The same glamour and melodramatic character 
were thrown in the newspapers of the time about the supposed " seizure" 
of this ferry boat. General Butler in his letter to Governor Andrew de- 
scribes himself as detailing officers to "take possession of the boat at 
Havre-de-Grace" (meaning Perryville) ; 2 and Capt. F. T. Newhall says 
" the steamer was instantly taken without firing a shot." 3 

But Greeley, in his American Conflict, goes far beyond this. After 
describing the burnt bridges and the lack of cars, he proceeds : "But 
General Butler was not a man to be stopped by such impediments. Seiz- 
ing the spacious and commodious ferry steamer Maryland, he embarked 
his men thereon." 4 Nobody took the pains to point out that the steamer 
had on the preceding day (April 19) been retained for that precise* pur- 
pose by the president of the road, Mr. Felton, who had also provided 
it with coal and a pilot for Annapolis -; 5 so that it was simply awaiting the 
arrival of the Massachusetts troops to get up steam and proceed. It is 
very probable that this fact was not generally known among the soldiers, 
though it must have been known to General Butler. It is true also that 
the whole region was in confusion, and that the Salem Zouaves (Captain 
Devereux), attached temporarily to the 8th Mass., were quite right in ad- 
vancing upon the boat as guardedly and skilfully as if they were in an 
enemy's country and the boat were in alien hands ; but there is now no 
doubt in regard to the previous intention and premeditation by which the 
vessel had been placed there, or the peacefulness of its final occupation. 



1 This letter will be found in Schouler, I, 99, and in Headley's Massachusetts in the Civil War, p. 25. 
Schouler (I, 101, 133) fully recognizes that it was Felton who planned the expedition. The Comte de 
Paris makes no mention of Felton, but attributes the whole plan to General Wool, whom he assumes to 
have been without instructions from Washington. 

2 Letter in Schouler, I, 99. 3 See letter in Schouler, I, 103. 

4 Greeley, I, 468, 469. So the New York Commercial Advertiser (April 29, 1861) spoke of "the 
Maryland, which had been seized by General Butler " (Rebellion Record, I, 49.) 

5 Mr. S. M. Felton's statement will be found in full in Schouler, I, 101. Mr. Felton himself was a 
Massachusetts man and a Harvard graduate. 



THE OCCUPATION OF BALTIMORE. 25 

The words ' ' seized " and ' ' taken without firing a shot " simply belonged 
to what may be called the mythical period of our early war history. The 
ferry boat was anchored, on arrival, near the schoolship, the frigate Con- 
stitution ; and two companies were placed on board of the vessel for her 
security, until she could sail for New York. The mechanical training of 
the regiment showed itself in the promptness with which the railway and 
locomotives were repaired ; and the regiment with the 7th New York set 
forth on the 24th upon a toilsome march to Washington, 1 where they 
arrived the 26th, General Butler remaining at Annapolis. 

On their arrival at Washington, Colonel Monroe asked to be relieved 
from command and Lieut. -Col. Edward W. Hincks was promoted to his 
place. Governor Andrew once said publicly that Colonel (afterwards 
major-general) Hincks was the first man to offer him his individual ser- 
vices for the war. When the regiment was mustered out after three 
months' service, it received special thanks from Congress for the energy 
and patriotism displayed by it in overcoming obstacles, both by sea and 
land. 

VI. THE OCCUPATION OP BALTIMORE. 

On May 12, 1861, took place another of those events which, having 
been surrounded with the excited and melodramatic aspect of that period, 
remained in this confused shape until the official records were published. 
On the day already named General Butler ordered a force from the Eelay 
House to march into Baltimore and take possession of Federal Hill. It 
was practically an attempt of little or no danger, inasmuch as what was 
then called the "blockade" of Baltimore was ended, and a force of 
Pennsylvania troops under Colonel Patterson had marched through on 
May 9, without any excitement, under orders of General Patterson, com- 
manding the Department of Washington. 2 But, such as it was, this occu- 

1 This march was graphically described by Major Winthrop (Atlantic Monthly, VII, 744). 

2 "Having succeeded in securing a well-protected line of communication with Washington, I turned 
my attention to re-establishing the route through Baltimore . . . and in this I was well aided by His 
Excellency Gtovernopr Hicks." (Patterson's Shenandoah Campaign, p. 27.) The force which opened the 
way through Baltimore consisted of five companies of the 3d U. S. Infantry, Major Shepard, five hundred 
men; one company of Maj. T. W. Sherman's battery, six pieces of cannon and seventy horses; and the 
1st Regiment of Penn. Artillery, " 17th of the Line," and afterwards known from its drab hats as "the 
Quaker Regiment," armed with muskets, eight hundred men. The mayor, police commissioners and a 
police force were present. " There was no excitement other than that which proceeded from the curiosity 
of the people to witness the proceedings." (New York "Tribune, May 10, 1861, in Putnam's Rebellion 
Record, 1 (Diary) , pp. 61, 62.) " Without any molestation or any symptoms of a hostile demonstration." 
(Bates, History Pennsylvania Volunteers, I, 160.) 



26 NAKRATIVE. 



pation of Baltimore was attributed by Parton and other writers of that 
period to General Butler's own initiative ; yet it now appears from his 
own report to General Scott, dated May 15, 1861, that this act was per- 
formed " in obedience to verbal directions received from the War Depart- 
ment through Mr. Harriman." l 

General Scott had, however, written, the day previous, that it was 
taken without his knowledge and of course without his approbation. It 
was not till two days after it had happened that General Butler thought it 
necessary to inform General Scott, and then only in answer to a peremptory 
telegram. 2 The removal of General Butler from the command of Annapolis 
was undoubtedly due as much to this neglect as to any disapproval of his 
action. This was more than five months, it must be remembered, before 
the time when General Scott retired from the command of the Union 
armies. 

The narratives of the day added something of the same melodramatic 
character to all the details of this occupation. In Mr. Parton's descrip- 
tion : "A thunderstorm of irregular character, extraordinary both for its 
violence and extent, hung over the city, black as midnight. . . . The depot 
was almost deserted and scarcely any one was in the streets. . . . The 
orders were for no man to speak a needless word ; no drums to beat. . . . 
When the line had cleared the depot the storm burst. Such torrents of 
rain ! Such a ceaseless blaze of lightning ! Such crashes and volleys of 
thunder ! . . . Not a countenance appeared in any window ; for so inces- 
sant Was the thunder that the tramp of horses, the tread of the men, the 
rumble of the cannon were not heard." 3 Such is the melodramatic scene 
conjured up by the skilled imagination of Mr. Parton, — one of the most 
amiable of men, but one of the least reliable of historians, — a picture 
annihilated in a moment by the testimony of his own subject of biography, 
who writes to General Scott that he " took possession of Federal Hill amid 
the plaudits of many of the people." 4 The Baltimore Clipper of the day 
after the entry was still more explicit: "On the route to the Hill the 
streets were thronged with people, who greeted the military with cheers at 
every stop, the ladies at the windows and the doors joining in the applause 
by waving their handkerchiefs." It then describes how, when the troops 

' Official War Records, II, 29. a Official War Records, II, 28. 

3 Parton's Butler, p. 111. 4 General Butler, in Official War Records, II, 29. 



THE THREE YEARS' REGIMENTS. 27 



had reached their destination, and not till then, "their operations were 
seriously interrupted by a soaking shower." * Thus curiously exaggerated 
and distorted, in those days, was every step of our novel military 
experience. 

The troops which accompanied General Butler on this expedition were 
the 6th Mass. V. M., Colonel Jones (five hundred), the 8th N. Y. Infantry, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Waterbury (four hundred and fifty) , and a section of 
Cook's Battery, under Major Cook. No lives were lost or even endangered ; 
yet at that period of inexperience it seemed an important military move- 
ment, and it doubtless did much to confirm that sway of the more loyal 
elements in Baltimore, which soon became unquestionable. But it also 
contributed to that rather impulsive and undisciplined way of action, on 
the part of energetic officers, which cost so many lives before it had given 
place to military discipline. 

Vn. THE THREE YEARS' REGIMENTS. 

The three months' levy was now in the field. But those who already 
saw that a long and difficult war was upon us — nobody yet deemed how 
formidable — felt the absolute necessity of longer enlistments. On May 3 
Governor Andrew wrote to President Lincoln : "I beg leave to add that 
immediately on receiving your proclamation we took up the war and have 
carried on our part of it in the spirit in which we believe the administra- 
tion and the American people intend to act ; namely, as if there were not 
an inch of red tape in the world. We have now enough additional men to 
furnish you with six more regiments to serve for the war, unless sooner 
discharged." 2 This meant a three years' enlistment, — a term which covered 
all the time that any one then deemed necessary. 3 On May 3, 1861, the 
President called for thirty-nine regiments of infantry and one of cavalry, 
to serve for three years or during the war ; but it was not until May 19 
that the quota of Massachusetts was assigned. Companies were meanwhile 

1 Baltimore Clipper, May 14, 1861, in Putnam's Records, I (Diary), 69. The historian of the 6th 
Regiment, Rev. J. W. Hanson, says nothing of any storm encountered on arriving at the city, but says 
that there was a violent thunder shower after the arrival at Federal Hill, and while the troops were rais- 
ing then flag (p. 61). 

3 See the whole letter in Schouler, I, 130. 

3 Captain Richardson of Cambridge, however, in recruiting his pioneer company, had named five years 
as the term of enlistment, — a piece of foresight then almost unexampled. See, ante, p. 9. 



28 NARRATIVE. 



organized and drilled, and paraded the streets ; the governor telegraphed 
again and again for orders to enlist them in regiments ; for more than a 
fortnight no reply came from Washington. At last on May 22 a letter 
was received from Secretary S. Cameron (dated May 15), authorizing the 
State, almost as a favor, to furnish six regiments, and adding: "It is 
important to reduce rather than enlarge this number, and in no event to 
exceed it. Let me earnestly recommend you, therefore, to call for no more 
than eight regiments, of which six only are to serve for three years or dur- 
ing the war, and if more are already called for to reduce the number by dis- 
charge." 1 It is plain from this that the loyal governors had to raise troops 
at the outset under the direct discouragement of the War Department 
itself; and that they were expected to repress, not stimulate, the patriotic 
zeal of the citizens. No one can read the reports of the early town meet- 
ings of Massachusetts, to which the second volume of Schouler's history is 
devoted, without recognizing that there was in these self-governing com- 
munities far more comprehension of the real greatness of the struggle then 
before us than was to be found among the so-called statesmen at Wash- 
ington. Most wars in other nations have been the work of rulers or public 
men, who have drawn unwilling nations after them ; but the American 
Civil War was at first, and remained for a long time, at the North, a war 
whose full importance was first recognized by the people, urging on a slow 
and reluctant government. 2 

The six regiments thus called for "were organized, armed, equipped, 
clothed and sent forward within four weeks after orders were received that 
they would be accepted." 3 The 1st (Colonel Cowdin) left the State on 
June 15 for Washington, and was the first three years' regiment that 
arrived there ; the 2d (Colonel Gordon) left the State July 8 for the front ; 
the 7th left for Washington July 11 ; the 9th and 11th on June 24 and the 
10th on June 25, — all for Washington. All these were three years' regi- 

1 See the whole of this singular epistle in Schouler, I, 167. Compare also Schouler, II, 10. 

2 General Sherman, in his Memoirs (I, 231), describes a conversation with Mr. Cameron in October, 
1861, in which the former said : " I asserted that there were plenty of men at the North ready and willing 
to come, if he would only accept their services ; for it was notorious that regiments had been formed in all 
the north-western States, whose services had been refused by the War Department, on the ground that 
they would not be needed. ... I thought I had roused Mr. Cameron to a realization of the great war that 
was before us and was in fact upon us." For regiments declined, see Schouler, I, 148, 165, 167, 169; also 
Patterson's Shenandoah, p. 29. The 7th N. Y. Cavalry was organized, equipped, drilled for six months, 
and then disbanded as not needed. (Eyland's Evolution of a Life, p. 150.) 

3 Schouler, I, 168. 



THE EARLY MAJOR-GENERALS. 29 
■ - % 

ments ; and when, on June 17, the consent of the government was obtained 

for raising ten more regiments, they were organized with the same energy 

which had already given Massachusetts an unquestioned superiority in 

promptness of organization at the outbreak of the war. 



Vin. THE EARLY MAJOR-GENERALS. 

On May 16, 1861, before any battle had taken place, the United States 
government began its appointment of major-generals of volunteers ; and as 
all three of the appointments of that date were from civil life, 1 and as two 
of these were from Massachusetts, the seniority thus established had an 
important and not always a favorable bearing on the position of Massa- 
chusetts in the war. The senior officer of the three, Gen. John A. Dix, 
had in early life served for sixteen years in the regular army and had risen 
to the rank of captain, but General Banks and General Butler had had only 
the slight experience of the muster field, such as that then was, and had 
wholly missed the valuable discipline of the lower grades of command. 
The mistake — as was pointed out freely by such acute foreign observers as 
Count Gurowski and Comte de Paris 2 — was not in making them officers, 
but in putting them at once at the top of the ladder. Intended as a com- 
pliment, it was in reality a doubtful advantage. One must have been in 
military service, perhaps, to know how new a sphere of life it is for a 
civilian, even for a militia man, and how formidable is the difficulty of 
being placed at one stroke where one must give orders as a master, instead 
of learning as an apprentice. For it is to be observed that if a man placed 
suddenly in high command does not know the rudiments of his trade at 
first, he has a very difficult task in learning them ; he cannot easily ask 
questions of his subordinates, and, if he does, cannot get them impartially 
answered ; he must often hold his tongue, accept the attitude of omniscience 
and remain ignorant. Unfortunately, his ignorance may have to be 
measured at last by the human lives it costs to teach him. A civilian, when 
placed in the ranks, or even made a line or field officer, can at least ask 

I The next one was that of Gen. David Hunter (August 13), and the next that of Gen. E. A. Hitch- 
cock (Feb. 10, 1862) , both these being West Point graduates. 

II The latter describes them as "the improvised generals. ' (Civil War in America (translation) , I, 
165.) 



30 NARRATIVE. 



instruction from those who know more than he does ; but the senior major- 
generals of an army cannot easily do this, and are hence greatly to be 
pitied, as are also, sometimes, those who are to serve under them. 

No delusion is more common in the heart of an American citizen than 
to believe that a man who has shown ability in any sphere can, at the 
shortest possible notice, exhibit it in the highest grade of any other sphere. 
It was common, too, at the beginning of the war, to cite historical instances 
of civilians who had, by merely buckling on uniform, become great 
commanders. Cromwell, Hampden, Andrew Jackson were quoted as 
examples ; but Cromwell began military service as captain of a troop of 
horse, and was not commissioned even as colonel until he had gone through 
the battle of Edgehill. Hampden began his career as captain of a local 
regiment, and rose no higher than colonel. Jackson had fought through 
six months of Indian warfare, with three thousand men under him, before 
he defended New Orleans with barely twice that number. These modest 
precedents certainly gave no ground for entrusting the command of great 
army corps to men who had never before heard a shot fired in anger. 
There were volunteer generals who did Massachusetts peculiar honor, and 
who had the inestimable advantage of beginning near the foot of the ladder. 
Such men were Hincks, Devens, Lowell, Bartlett, Miles. With these and 
such as these in mind, it seems too strong an expression to say, with 
a recent historical writer, " Not one New England soldier achieved 
renown." 1 Bartlett left on record, in the most instructive way, not 
merely his own modesty but his common-sense view of high military 
position. He was probably, out of all those whom Massachusetts sent 
forth, the man who had the most precocious and innate gift for war. 
After he had been appointed brigadier-general of volunteers (June 20, 
1864) and had been assigned to Major-General Ledlie's division of the 9th 
Corps, there was, it seems, some talk of giving him command of the 
division ; but he writes to his mother, " I think I had rather try a brigade, 
before I venture any higher, although the whole division does not muster 
so many as a full brigade of four regiments should." 2 Yet the man who 
made this modest remark had seen three years of the most active service, 
had been in action repeatedly, had lost a leg and just escaped losing an 
arm, had drilled and organized two raw regiments, and had twice com- 



1 C. F. Adams, Three Episodes of Massachusetts Historjs II, 764. * Palfrey, Bartlett, p. 117. 



THE EARLY MAJOR-GENERALS. 31 



manded, for short intervals, eight thousand men. This is the spirit of a 
true officer ; this the training of a real soldier. 

The absence of this training was the great obstacle against which Dix, 
Banks and Butler had to contend ; Dix less than the others, because he had 
gone through an early military education, though with more than thirty 
years of civil life intervening, and also because he was not called upon to 
command an army corps. All three were men of distinguished ability ; all 
showed this quality wherever mere personal energy and organizing talent 
were needed. All were, for instance, successful rulers of cities, even in 
war time, — Dix at New York, Banks at Washington and Butler at New 
Orleans ; and it can never be quite known, of course, what purely military 
eminence they might have obtained had they begun lower down in the 
school. 

The gradual publication of the official records of the war has had a 
marked effect upon the military reputation of these two conspicuous Massa- 
chusetts officers. In the case of .General Banks this influence has been 
rather favorable, as showing him to have been acting under positive orders 
at some periods when his action was most criticised. In the case of 
General Butler the effect has been the other way, because, as has been 
already seen, the inexorable light of the actual letters and telegrams has 
dispelled much of the glamor thrown by enthusiastic war correspondents — 
not wholly discouraged, it must be owned, b}^ himself — over a somewhat 
sensational career. 

He had indeed in many respects the temperament most sure to suffer 
from the sudden uplifting to high influence and command. He had some 
positive traits of the greatest value : great promptness of action and 
fertility of resources ; readiness in adopting the suggestions of others, even 
to the extent of sometimes forgetting that they were not his own ; and a 
boundless ambition, often showing itself in trivial ostentation, but often in 
the desire to identify himself with real public service. His strokes of wit 
— as in his introduction of the word ' ' contraband " — were sometimes 
half battles. 1 But he had a quick, imperious and jealous temper ; great 
vindictiveness, joined with much ingenuity in inflicting pain ; an acuteness 
of mind which readily availed itself of all the resources of military 



1 It appears that the word had been used in a similar sense by Thomas Scott, a member of the first 
Congress, but it attracted no attention. 



32 NARRATIVE. 



authority, and an utter disregard of all the defences carefully thrown by 
wise army rules about the rights of subordinates ; * an impetuous reckless- 
ness of statement and a lawyer's ingenuity in special pleading. If ever a 
man entered military service who needed the rigid preliminary repression 
of discipline, he was that man ; instead of which he was taken and placed 
very nearly at the head of the volunteer service of the country, and had 
under his power the life, liberty and honor of many thousand men. 



IX. THE BATTLES OF 1861. 

The first regiment of Massachusetts to engage in battle in the war was 
the 4th Mass. Infantry (Colonel Packard), the occasion being that of 
Big Bethel, June 10, 1861, an aimless contest, of which it can only be said 
that the 4th Mass. behaved well. The real disaster was the first-fruit of 
that unfortunate jealousy of the regular army with which so many volunteer 
officers began their careers and which the wisest of them soon outgrew. 2 
General Butler, upon whom it devolved to select a commander for this 
night expedition, had at his command, in the colonel of the 1st Vermont, 
John W. Phelps, an officer of West Point training, Mexican war experience 
and proved courage ; but,' passing by him, he designated to command the 
night attack a militia brigadier from Massachusetts, Gen. (afterwards 
colonel) E. W. Peirce, who was doubtless personally brave but was 
utterly inexperienced. The whole plan of the expedition was so imprac- 
ticable that Colonel (afterwards major-general) Phelps predicted in 
advance precisely what occurred, — that the troops, coming together by 
different routes in the darkness of the night, would fire on each other. 
Nothing was gained nor could anything important have been gained by the 
attempt ; 3 one member of the 4th Regiment was killed and two wounded, 
while two very valuable lives, those of Lieutenant Greble, U. S. A., and 



1 See striking instances of this in Butler's Campaign on the Hudson, by Rev. H N. Hudson ; in Gor- 
don's War Diary, p. 411; in Eyland's Evolution of a Life, p. 231; and in Putnam's Co. A, 25th Mass., 
p. 232. 

2 Generals Devens and Hincks, two of the most distinguished of the Massachusetts officers, both assured 
me that in their opinion this jealousy was wholly unfounded, and that they personally had always had 
the friendliest relations with regular army men. 

3 " There never was any intention of maintaining it [the post] , even if captured." (Report of Major- 
General Butler, Official War Records, II, 80.) See the references to this battle in De Leon's Four Years 
in Rebel Capitals, p. 113, and Walcott's 21st Mass., p. 264. 



THE BATTLES OF 1861. 33 



Maj. T. Winthrop, were sacrificed ; and the discouragement of a first defeat 
formed the beginning of the war. 1 

When, on July 18, 1861, the Army of the Potomac made its first 
reconnoissance at Blackburn's Ford, the duty was chiefly performed by the 
1st Mass. Infantry (Col. Eobert Cowdin), the first three years' regiment to 
leave the State, and the first in the service of the United States to report at 
Washington. In this engagement died Lieut. W. H. B. Smith of Cam- 
bridge, the first of two hundred and eight volunteer lieutenants from 
Massachusetts who fell in the war ; and the manner of his death was 
curiously illustrative of that early period of playing with edge-tools. The 
uniforms of the two armies were as yet so much alike that, as in the early 
days of the English civil war, it was almost impossible to tell friend from 
foe when a few hundred yards distant ; and it was only when Lieutenant 
Smith had announced to the Confederate skirmishers that he was from 
Massachusetts that he was killed by an immediate volley. In another part 
of the same field the same explanation, given by Captain Carruth, was all 
that prevented a Michigan regiment from firing on the 1st Mass. 2 

Three Massachusetts regiments only took part in the battle of Bull Run 
or Manassas (July 21, 1861), these being the 1st Infantry (Colonel Cow- 
din), the 5th (Colonel Lawrence) and the 11th (Col. George Clark, Jr.). 
It is something to say that neither of the three did itself discredit in the 
way of cowardice oh a day where so many failed. The 5th remained a day 
beyond its term of service to take part in the affair, and its colonel was 
wounded, his life being saved through the prompt action of a friend and 

1 "The several detachments of infantry, with a section of regular artillery, in command of Lieutenant 
Greble, left Newport News rather late the night before the Big Bethel affair. Colonel Phelps, Major 
Stuart of the Engineers and the writer accompanied Lieutenant Greble, who had the left in the line 
of march for about three miles. During the walk back to camp Colonel Phelps stated that, in his 
opinion, the detachments coming from Camp Hamilton and those going from Newport News, commanded 
by inexperienced officers, would meet in the early dawn, mistake each other for the enemy, then a con- 
test between friendly troops, resulting in a slaughter of our own men, the alarm of the enemy, their 
escape and the total failure of the expedition. The writer parted with him at his tent about one o'clock 
in the morning. He said that he waB sure that the anticipated blunder would be made, and that the 
writer, as soon as he heard the firing, must get his regiment ready to move. At early dawn two of the 
detachments met. Townsend's 3d and Bendix's 7th New York Volunteers fired into each other, and all 
the,bad results anticipated were realized. The echo of this musketry had hardly died away when Colonel 
Phelps stood at the entrance of the tent of the writer and said, ' It is as I thought it would be, they are 
firing into each other; get your regiment ready, and report as a reinforcement to General Peirce.' The 
account of the affair of the two Bethels has passed into history. This, however, is the first time that this 
singular example of intuition on the part of General Phelps has ever been written for publication." 
(Report of Association of Graduates, XL S. Military Academy, 1885, p. 77.) 

* History of the 1st Regiment Mass. Infantry, by Warren H. Cudworth, pp. 43, 47. For the blue uni- 
forms of Confederates, see Walcott's 21st Mass., p. 146, and Colonel Cowdin in Official War Records, XI, 
125. 



34 NARRATIVE. 



classmate, Private George F. Hodges, 1 who himself died later in the ser- 
vice, as adjutant of the 18th Mass. Infantry. Twenty-two prisoners were 
taken from the 5th Mass., and were held for ten months before they could 
be exchanged. Of the 11th, two captains, a lieutenant and many wounded 
men were also taken prisoners, besides fifteen killed. The 1st Regiment 
took but little part in the battle, but lost Lieut. E. B. Gill, who was killed 
in the retreat. Its brigade commander, Col. I. B. Richardson of the 2d 
Michigan, reported of his brigade : " My brigade in general behaved itself 
nobly and always stood firm." Col. (afterwards major-general) W. B. 
Franklin criticised the 5th and 11th as firing badly and as making their 
movements somewhat unsteadily while under fire ; but he ends by extend- 
ing these criticisms over the whole of the raw troops on that day. " The 
firing of the rebels," he says, " was better than ours." 2 

The battle of Ball's Bluff or Edwards' Ferry (Oct. 21, 1861) was the 
last of the early amateur battles, as they might be called, in which the 
Massachusetts troops were engaged in 1861. The commanding officer, 
Gen. C. P. Stone, under whose orders 3 troops were sent across a rapid 
stream and exposed to a greater force, without intrenchments and with the 
stream behind them, was a Massachusetts man and a regular army officer. 
So was Gen. Frederick W. Lander, who fell in the battle, and was the first 
of her general officers to die in the service, — as he had also been the first 
of all men, it was claimed, to offer his services to the general government. 4 

The 15th Mass. Infantry (Colonel Devens) and the 20th (Col. W. R. 
Lee) were (with the 71st Pennsylvania) the regiments chiefly engaged, 
the two companies of the 19th not being in action. Placed in a hopeless 
position, and hopelessly outnumbered, they did as well, doubtless, as any 
raw troops could have done ; and when they retreated at last, every man 
for himself, across a river which, as the writer heard Colonel Devens say 

1 See his memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 351. 

2 Official War Records, II, 376, 407. 

3 " My telegram did not contemplate the making an attack upon the enemy or the crossing of the river 
in force by any portion of General Stone's command." (Report of General G. B. McClellan, Official War 
Records, V, 290.) It is probable, on the other hand, that General Stone believed himself to be carrying 
out General McClellan's intentions, nor did he ever forfeit that general's confidence. Compare McClellan's 
Own Story (p. 187) and Battles aDd Leaders of the Civil War (Century War Book), II, 131. It is now 
generally admitted that General Baker's inexperience was largely to blame for the defeat. Good descrip- 
tions of the battle may be found in the Comte de Paris, Civil War in America (translation), I, 417, 
and in Palfrey's Bartlett, 17. On the " folly" of Ball's Bluff, see Gordon's Brook Farm to Cedar Moun- 
tain, 61, 64. General Baker's case is stated in Senator E. D. Baker's Defence at' Ball's Bluff. 

4 See his funeral sermon, by Rev. George W. Briggs, D.D. 



FILLING UP THE REGIMENTS. 35 



afterwards, " literally boiled with bullets," they had the glory of a severe 
engagement, if not of victory, about half of each regiment being killed, 
wounded or missing. 1 *- v - 

Col. W. R. Lee of the 20th was captured, with the major and surgeon, 
four captains (three wounded), the adjutant and two other lieutenants. 
The major and surgeon were both grandsons of the revolutionary hero, 
Paul Revere. 2 ' A captain and two lieutenants of the 20th were killed, one 
of the latter being young William Lowell Putnam, whose great grand- 
father, Judge Lowell, inserted the anti-slavery clause in the Bill of Rights 
of Massachusetts. Putnam, when the surgeon came to dress his wound in 
the hospital, said, "Go to some one else; you cannot save me." The 
boy-lieutenant of the 15th, John William Grout of Worcester, barely 
eighteen and fresh from a military school, took a load of wounded across 
the stream, under fire, returned for another, sent it off while he remained, 
then went to his colonel and asked, " Is there anything more that I 
can do?" and, on being told that there was nothing, swam the stream 
himself and was shot and killed when half-way across. Dr. Haven of 
the same regiment and Dr. Hayward of the 20th decided, as the former 
wrote afterwards, "to remain and be taken, and get off what men we 
could." 3 Capt. Moses W. Gatchell (15th Mass.) was also killed. 

Major-General Stone, in his official report, pays the highest tribute to 
the behavior of Colonel Devens and his command, as "exhibiting every 
proof of high courage and good discipline," and attributes the entire 
calamity to the fact that the cavalry scouts, upon whom Devens had relied 
to give him information as to the approach of the enemy, had been 
withdrawn without his knowledge. 4 

X. FILLING UP THE REGIMENTS. 

After the battle of Ball's Bluff, the mayor of Worcester sent a mes- 
senger to enquire of Colonel Devens what the city could do for the 15th 
Mass., which had been recruited there. The answer was : " Send us three 
hundred and ten men to fill our gaps ; also a blanket and a pair of mittens 



i " Fifty per cent." (Report of Lieutenant Colonel Palfrey, Official War Records, V, 318.) 

2 See their memoirs in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 124, 219. 

s See memoirs of Grout and Haven in Marvin's Worcester in the War, pp. 456, 468. 

4 Official War Records, V, 296. 



36 NARRATIVE. 



for each of us. That will do for the present." 1 Doubtless the clothing 
was supplied, but the need of recruits for any particular regiment brought 
up some new problems not quite so easy to solve. 

There is no subject on which criticism has been more constant than on 
the mistaken policy pursued in some of the States, and especially in Massa- 
chusetts, in respect to recruiting. Mr. J. C. Ropes, who is undoubtedly 
our ablest military critic, thinks that the greater part of the Northern States 
"blindly and recklessly threw away" the "army's capital," as he calls it, 
of long service and experience, by forming new regiments instead of filling 
up the old ones. "It is difficult to speak with patience," he says, " of 
this wretched business." In this respect he thinks that " the Federal army 
of the West," under Sherman, had immensely the advantage, through "the 
wiser and more military policy which the Western States generally adopted 
in the matter of recruiting their contingents." 2 "The Union army," says 
an able Massachusetts colonel, ' ' was probably the only army in modern 
civilized warfare which as a rule was recruited by the addition of new 
regiments instead of by filling up the old organizations." 3 

So the Comte de Paris says : "In order to procure a rapid supply of 
men it was necessary constantly to create new regiments. These regiments 
brought with them all the inexperience which had cost so dear to their 
predecessors, without deriving any profit from the experience acquired by 
the latter." 4 

Granting all that is said by these critics, there is a point which they 
rarely recognize, namely, that this mode of procedure was not mainly matter 
of choice but of necessity. There were occasions when the army must be 
filled up in this way or not at all. Brevet Brigadier-General Walcott him- 
self, who was for a time Governor Andrew's military secretary, describes 
vividly a scene between the governor and a local selectman, who in 1864 
offered a company from his town for a new regiment if the officers called for 
by the men could be commissioned. The governor vehemently opposed 
this, but was met by the selectman with the simple statement that not a man 
could be raised in his town for an old regiment. "Since new regiments 
were better than none, and quotas must be filled, Governor Andrew had to 

> H. S. Washburn's Poems, p. 19. 

2 The War as we see it now, in Scribner's Magazine, June, 1891, pp. 784, 785. 

8 History 21st Mass., by Charles F. Walcott, p. 221. 

4 Civil War in America (translation) , I, 274. 



FILLING UP THE REGIMENTS. -37 



yield ; and wound up with this vehement commentary, ' Julius Caesar himself 
couldn't raise a company for an old regiment in Massachusetts, as long as 
there is a shoemaker left to make a captain of.'" 1 

This sufficiently refutes the claim sometimes made that this substitution 
of new regiments for old was Governor Andrew's own policy, 2 but it leaves 
the question still open why this policy was necessary in Massachusetts and 
not in Vermont or in the Western States. As regards Vermont, the case is 
very simple. It was the only Northern State in which the State regiments 
were regularly brigaded together, so that the local esprit de corps was thus 
retained. The officers of the brigade were well known, the State was a 
small one, and every recruit felt that he should in any case be practically 
among his neighbors. It was this very strength of local feeling which made 
the demand for new regiments in Massachusetts. As to the West, a vivid 
sense of the difference in this respect between an older State and a newer 
one will be found by simply comparing the published rosters and noting 
a single point. Every catalogue of Massachusetts soldiers designates the 
town where each one lived, while in corresponding catalogues of Western 
soldiers, as of those from Minnesota, for instance, not a town is mentioned, 
— every man belonged to the State only. It is perhaps the price that 
Massachusetts pays for that township system which Jefferson thought so 
powerful. If a Minnesota man wished to go to the war, he went ; if it were 
among strangers, no matter ; he had spent his life among strangers, or at 
least among recent acquaintances. Even in Minnesota it was easier to 
create new regiments than to fill up old ones. "To fill the existing regi- 
ments required only individual enlistments ; but they had ceased to be spon- 
taneous, as they had been in the beginning, and it was much easier to raise 
a new regiment, with the aid of those who expected to be commissioned in it, 
than to -enlist the same number of men for regiments already at the front." 3 

1 Walcott's 21st Mass., p. 222. The officer who wrote that book resigned from his command in April, 
1863, because his company, with a captain, two lieutenants and a full list of non-commissioned officers, 
had but six privates present for duty (p. 269) . He was afterwards commissioned as colonel of the 60th 
Mass. 

2 " It was the policy of Governor Andrew to keep the regiments in the service full, rather than to 
organize new regiments while the old regiments were wanting men. In pursuance of this policy, seven 
thousand men were enlisted during the year 1862, assigned to regiments in the field and forwarded to their 
several destinations." (Schouler's Massachusetts in the Civil War, I, 336.) "Generals Halleck, Burn- 
side, Reno, Parke, Cullom and Sedgwick have all made most earnest inquiries concerning the suc- 
cess of the recruiting in Massachusetts, and expressed the greatest satisfaction at your determination to fill 
up the old regiments first." (Letter of Col. Harrison Ritchie to Governor Andrew from Harrison's Bar, 
James River, Va., July 28, 1862.) (Schouler, I, 308.) 

3 Minnesota in the Civil War and Indian Wars, 1861-65 (official) , p. 699. 



38 NARRATIVE. 



And much more the Massachusetts man with two hundred years of tradition 
behind him wished to go with his neighbors, to be commanded by men 
whom he knew, — by a local shoemaker rather than by Julius Caesar. 

It is to be noticed that much the same conditions of local organization 
are carefully preserved in the model army of the world, that of Germany. 
General Sheridan tells us that ' ' a local or territorial system of recruiting " 
is "the very foundation of the German army." 1 

Joined with this, there were no doubt minor considerations. In enter- 
ing a new regiment a man took his chance with the rest for speedy promo- 
tion ; in an old regiment he took his place at the foot, and could count 
pretty surely on remaining forever in the ranks. The natural American 
instinct of rising was in the way of this self-sacrifice. Again, by an impulse 
possibly natural but most ungracious, the new recruit in an old regiment 
was apt to be received not kindly or even gratefully, as one who brought 
aid to the whole, but with a foolish contempt and derision, amounting to 
actual severity and hardship. 

' ' The lot of the recruit in an old company was at the best not an 
enviable one, and sometimes was made very disagreeable to him. He stood 
in much the same relation to the veterans of his company that the freshman 
in college does to the sophomores, or did when hazing was the rule and not 
the exception. . . . He easily became the butt of his company. . . . Many 
of the veterans seemed to forget how they themselves obtained their edu- 
cation, little by little, and so ofttimes bore down upon recruits with great 
severity." 2 

After July 21, 1862, when an order was obtained from the Secretary of 
War, promising that new recruits assigned to any regiment should be 
mustered out with the regiment, it became much easier to secure recruits for 
old regiments. "Most of our regiments in the field had two yeai's yet to 
serve, and there was a general belief that before the expiration of the regi- 
ments' terms the war would be at an end. The effect of the order was to 
send nearly five thousand men to fill up the depleted ranks." 3 



J Personal Memoirs, II, 450. 

2 J. D. Billings, Hard-tack, etc., p. 202. Compare the graphic description in Parker's 32d Mass. Vols. 
of the derisive and unmannerly reception of a recruiting force by an old regiment (pp. 45, 46). The regi- 
ments in the Confederate service were more generally filled up. See De Leon, Four Years in Rebel 
Capitals, p. 178. 

» Adjutant-General's report, January, 1865, p. 51. 



FILLING UP THE REGIMENTS. 39 

Another problem early presented to Governor Andrew was that of pro- 
motion from the ranks. It seems now incredible that this should ever have 
presented itself as a problem, or that there should have been any hesitation 
in such promotions ; but those who recall that period will well remember to 
have heard the view expressed that the English army, not the French, 
should be in this respect our model, and that a little antecedent superiority 
of social position was essential, at least in the city regiments. After the 
fearful losses in battle of one of the best Massachusetts regiments, General 
(then colonel) Devens said to its commander, " Colonel, the sooner you get 
this blue-blood notion out of your head the better for yourself and your 
regiment." 1 Many letters were received in Boston from sergeants in 
various regiments, complaining of the appointment over their heads — or the 
threatened appointment — of inexperienced civilians ; 2 and it was fortunate 
that the strongly democratic spirit of Governor Andrew settled so promptly 
the policy of the State for all but the colored regiments, where the 
reluctance of the general government itself limited the promotions to a very 
few. 3 As a matter of fact, during 1861 and 1862 there were four hundred 
and sixty-three second lieutenants taken from enlisted men to supply 
vacancies in regiments, while the officers taken from civil life for that pur- 
pose were four captains, nine first lieutenants and thirty-five second lieuten- 
ants. It is claimed by Adjutant-General Schouler that " in a majority of 
these cases the appointments have been made at the earnest request of the 
field officers of the regiments in which they were commissioned, and in all 
cases for the good of the service." 4 It is possible that this last assertion 
may have been premature ; the principle was a bad one, and the practice 
soon disappeared almost wholly except among the colored regiments. 6 

1 General Devens himself narrated this to the writer. 

a See Putnam's Co. A, 25th Mass. (pp. 126, 127), for illustrations of this. 

3 Chaplain Harrison of the 54th was the first Massachusetts officer so commissioned (Sept. 8, 1863) ; 
but he was not allowed the privileges of an officer on the United States transport which took him South 
until another Massachusetts officer had offered to surrender to him his state-room, for the sake of estab- 
lishing the principle 

4 Adjutant-General's report, January, 1863, p. 463. 

6 That the objection to promotion was more than a matter of personal preference was seen in one of the 
most noted Boston regiments in the case of one first sergeant, a young man of fine appearance, of the 
highest character, a college graduate and the son of a clergyman, whose promotion was resisted by some 
of his superior officers on the express ground that, although he was an excellent first sergeant, yet a man> 
once in the ranks should remain there. He afterwards rose by successive appointments to be captain in 
his own regiment. The writer has reason to think that this was one of the cases which led Governor 
Andrew to the strong attitude he took upon the subject in his letter of Nov. 1, 1861 (Adjutant-General's 
report, January, 1862, p. 72). 



40 



NARRATIVE. 



Over brevet appointments Governor Andrew had of course no control, 
though he sometimes gave suggestions. These brevets were showered from 
the beginning of the war until long after its close, with a profusion that 
became an undoubted evil, and, being often the result of personal solicita- 
tion or lobbying, had much to do with that constant presence of military 
officers in Washington, which afforded much amusement to foreign visitors. 
There were of course many instances where brevets were the direct recogni- 
tion of brave deeds, but there was a large number of cases where they came 
simply from political influence and sometimes from the direct . neglect of 
duty, as evidenced by men's hanging round the Capitol at Washington 
instead of being at their places in the field. 1 

XI. THE NAVAL SERVICE. 

Massachusetts, being a seaside State and long the nursery of the merchant 
service, was naturally among the leading States for the supply of seamen. 
At the outset of the war the legal maximum of the navy was 7,600 
men. Of these there were on March 10, 1861, only 207 in all the ports 
and receiving ships on the Atlantic coast. 2 In July, 1863, there were 
34,000 men in the service, and when the war ended, 51,500. In the last 
months of the war a bounty of $1,010 was sometimes paid for a single 
seaman. 3 The official statistics show that of this vast addition to the 
numbers of the navy Massachusetts contributed a larger share than any 
State except New York ; indeed, nearly 20,000, or nearly one-fifth of the 
whole number. 4 



1 As to the constant applications for brevets, see Palfrey's Bartlett, p. 157 ; Comte de Paris (transla- 
tion), I, 22. 

2 Soley's The Blockade and the Cruisers, p. 19. 3 Soley, p. 10. 
4 Total number of sailors and marines furnished by the States : — 



Connecticut, 


. 


. 2,163 


Maryland, 


Delaware, 


• 


94 


Massachusetts, 


District of Columbia, 


. 1,353 


Michigan, 


Illinois, 


. 


. 2,224 


Minnesota, 


Indiana, . 


. . 


. 1,078 


Missouri, 


Iowa, 


. 


5 


New Hampshire, 


Kentucky, 


. 


314 


New Jersey, . 


Maine, 


. 


. 5,030 


New York, 



3,925 

19,983 

498 

3 

151 

882 

8,129 

35,164 



Ohio, 

Pennsylvania, 
Rhode Island, 
Vermont, 
Wisconsin, 

Total, 



3,274 
14,307 

1,878 
619 
133 

. 101,207 



(Official statement from the Adjutant-General's office, July 15, 1885; Heitman's Historical Register of 
the U. S. Army, p. 890.) Phisterer, an able statistician, claims, in his New York in the Civil War (p. 43), 
that the whole number serving in the U. S. Navy during the war was 132,554, of which New York 
furnished 50,936. He attempts no list of officers in the volunteer navy. 



THE NAVAL SERVICE. 41 



A body of volunteer naval officers had also to be created, and of these 
at least 1,757 out of 7,500 were furnished by Massachusetts, and especially 
for the Atlantic Ocean service, those employed on the Mississippi being 
mostly steamboat men and pilots. The regular officers formed about one- 
seventh of the whole number employed. 1 

In addition, Massachusetts furnished, in connection with the expedition 
for the relief of Fort Sumter, the man who was destined above all men to 
bring order out of chaos and organize our early navy. This was Capt. 
Gustavus Vasa Fox, assistant secretary of the navy. He had spent eighteen 
years of his life in the navy, but had resigned five years before the war, and 
had engaged in business. Nominally an assistant secretary, he was prac- 
tically, as has been said by others, a chief of staff, and the rapidity with 
which our young navy was organized was largely due to his efforts. Com- 
mander (afterwards admiral) Charles Henry Davis, another Massachusetts 
man, before best known as the captor, in 1857, of William Walker the fili- 
buster, also worked most efficiently, under the direction of the navy depart- 
ment, in boards to report on iron-clads and also on the enemy's coast. In 
that momentous early success of the war, the capture of Port Royal (Nov. 
7, 1861), he was fleet captain, and his promptness in surveying immedi- 
ately the channel for the larger vessels had much to do with the ultimate 
success. Flag-Officer Dupont says: "By the skill of Commander Davis, 
the fleet captain, and Mr. Boutelle, the able assistant of the coast survey, 
in charge of the steamer Vixen, the channel was immediately found, 
sounded out and buoyed." 2 The admirable plan of the attack is also 
understood to have been due largely to him. 

He was in charge of a project which finally proved rather abortive, of 
sinking what was called "a stone fleet" in the main ship channel of 
Charleston harbor (Dec. 20, 1861), and afterwards in Sullivan's Island 
channel. The project occasioned much discussion and denunciation, both 
here and in Europe, although the Confederates had not hesitated to obstruct 
channels wherever they found it desirable. 3 In this case it is doubtful 
whether any positive result followed, a better channel being at once formed 
south-east of Lighthouse Inlet. So far as the wooden obstructions were 

1 Soley, p. 9. 2 Ammen's Atlantic Coast, p. 18. (The Navy in the Civil War.) 

3 Ammen's Atlantic Coast, p. 41 ; Ammen's The Old Navy and the New, p. 416 ; Higginson's Army 
Life in a Black Regiment, p. 169; Gordon's War Diary, p. 257 ; Soley's The Blockade, etc., p. 107. 



42 NARRATIVE. 



concerned, the teredo or ship- worm soon disposed of them. All this must 
have been foreseen by so able an officer as Commander Davis, and it seems 
probable that the whole enterprise was mainly designed for intimidation. 

As flag-officer, Commander Davis succeeded Commodore Foote in com- 
mand of the newly improvised flotilla on the Mississippi River, this consist- 
ing partly of army rams devised and commanded by Colonel Ellet, and 
placed under the temporary command of the flag-officer. Commodore Foote 
had relinquished command, because of wounds, on May 9, 1861. The first 
naval engagement of the war, in the sense of a squadron fight, thus took 
place under a Massachusetts officer. It occurred before Fort Pillow, on 
May 10, and resulted in a partial victory for the Union flotilla, the Confed- 
erate rams having, however, done great damage, and the Union rams being 
not yet employed. Later, Fort Pillow was bombarded by Davis up to June 
4, when it was abandoned, leaving forty heavy guns and much military 
material. On June 6 Davis commanded in a second fight with the Confed- 
erate flotilla, he being now fully reinforced by Colonel Ellet and his rams. 
The eight Confederate boats had from two to four guns each, and the five 
Union boats from thirteen to eighteen guns each. 1 An hour's fight decided 
the fate of Memphis, which was surrendered to Davis without delay. His 
summons for its surrender is a document which ought, it has been said, to 
find a place in every future " polite letter writer." It runs thus : " Sir, I 
have the honor to request that you will surrender. I am, Mr. Mayor, with 
high respect, your obedient servant." 

The prophecy of Captain Montgomery, commanding the Confederate 
"river defence fleet," that "the enemy . . . will never penetrate farther 
down the Mississippi River," 2 was not fulfilled. Davis descended the river, 
and on July 1 joined Farragut's fleet from New Orleans. On October 15 
following he was relieved from command of the flotilla on arrival of Com- 
mander (afterwards admiral) Porter, who thus testifies to his services: 
"For the second time (i. e., at Memphis) Rear-Admiral Davis won a strictly 
naval victory, and won it without a single mistake. . . . Take the battle, 
together with its results, it was one of the handsomest achievements of the 
war, but it did not receive that general notice which it deserved. ... If 
Mr. Secretary Welles, who was liberal with his eulogistic letters to those 

1 Greene's Mississippi (Campaigns of the Civil War) , p. 15. 

2 See letter in Porter's Naval History of the Civil War, p. 167. 



THE NAVAL SERVICE. 43 



whom he approved of, ever congratulated Rear-Admiral Davis and his 
officers for their brilliant success, it nowhere appears in the secretary's 
report for 1862. But history will eventually give the credit to the brave 
men who served their country faithfully at the time of her greatest need." 1 

The plan of the light-draught Mississippi gunboats, called " tin-clads," 
from their armor, originated with Davis, and proved a device of great value. 2 
They were stern- wheel steamers, carrying iron plating from one-half to 
three-quarters inch thick, covering them to a height of eleven feet, making 
them proof against musketry and light field artillery ; they could carry, if 
needful, two hundred men, and had six or eight twenty-four-pound brass 
howitzers ; their draught ranged from eighteen inches to three feet, and they 
were of the greatest use for raids and skirmishing, as subsidiary to larger 
vessels. 

In the naval battle of March 8, 1862, in which for the first and last time 
the comparative strength of wooden and iron ships was tested, a prominent 
and most honorable, though most disastrous, part was taken by Massa- 
chusetts officers. The Roanoke, a fifty-gun steamer, whose machinery was, 
however, in a disabled condition, was commanded by Capt. John Marston, 
a Massachusetts man, and the Cumberland, a sloop of war of twenty-four 
guns, in the absence of the captain by Lieut. George W. Morris, aided by 
Lieut, (now admiral) Thomas O. Selfridge, Jr., both from this State, as 
were Acting Masters Randall and Kennison. The Cumberland, having been 
both rammed and fired into, sank with her flag still flying, carrying down 
with her more than one hundred men ; 3 and her guns were fired to the last, 
the final shot, discharged by Lieutenant Morris, fatally wounding the Con- 
federate Commander, Captain Buchanan. The final triumph of the Monitor 
need not be described. 

In September, 1862, Acting Master Crocker, a Massachusetts officer, was 
sent up the Sabine River to destroy a railroad bridge, which he did without 
injury. 4 

Commander Downes, a Massachusetts officer, commanded the monitor 
Nahant in the attack on Fort McAllister, March 3, 1863, and in the attack 
on Charleston, April 7; the Nahant being in this last attack "seriously 



i Porter's Naval History of the Civil War, p. 173. 

2 Mahan's The Gulf and Inland Waters (The Navy in the Civil War), pp. 51, 110. 

3 Boynton's History of the U. S. Navy, I, 366. 4 Soley, p. 143. 



44 NARRATIVE. 



damaged ; her turret so jammed as to prevent its turning, many of the bolts 
of both turret and pilot-house broken, and the latter rendered nearly unten- 
able by flying bolts and. nuts." 1 His vessel assisted, as a reserve, in the 
capture of the Atlanta in Wassaw Sound, on June 17, and assisted in cover- 
ing General Gillmore's batteries on Folly Island, July 10, an engagement in 
which the Nahant was hit six times. He joined with the other commanders 
of iron-clads in a letter in May, vindicating the cause of Admiral Dahlgren 
in declining to attack Charleston harbor with the monitors. 2 

A Massachusetts officer, Capt. (afterwards admiral) John A. Winslow, 
commanded the Kearsarge when it finally destroyed the Alabama, and put 
an end to its destructive career on June 19, 1863. His brief and modest 
despatch to the War Department on this occasion is one of the classics 
of the Civil War, and is in curious contrast with the burst of enthu- 
siasm which hailed his victory. "There was no occurrence during the 
war," says Admiral Porter, "more grateful to the Northern people. . . . 
Winslow became the hero of the hour, for he had not only disposed of a 
most troublesome enemy, but he had demonstrated the superiority of a 
United States ship, crew and guns over an English built, English armed 
and English manned vessel of equal if not superior force." 3 

In the attack on Fort Pulaski, and again in that on Charleston, Ensign 
M. L. Johnson was commended in orders. In the latter attack Lieut. -Com. 
W. D. Whiting commanded the gunboat Ottawa. Acting Master's Mate 
E. Boomer commanded the Granite in the Burnside expedition against 
Roanoke Island, Acting Master Peter Hayes the Morse, and Acting Master's 
Mate G. W. Graves the Lockwood. The latter also took part in the 
reduction of New Berne. All these were Massachusetts officers. 

In the daring though ineffectual boat attack on Fort Sumter, Sept. 8, 
1863, one of the five divisions of boats was commanded by Lieut, (now 
captain) F. J. Higginson. He was ordered to move up to the north-west 
front of the fort, to make a diversion, the other divisions being held back ; 
but, mistaking the movement, the other boats dashed on, and, as it seemed 
impossible to stop them, all were ordered to advance. 4 Acting Master's 
Mate J. E. Jones of the Monticello accompanied Lieut. Wm. B. Cushing in 
one of his daring expeditions up the Wilmington River, June 23, 1864. In 

1 Porter, p. 376. 2 Aminen's Atlantic Coast, p. 162. 

s Porter, p. 655. * Porter, p. 448. 



THE NAVAL SERVICE. 45 



the attack on Fort Fisher under General Terry, Jan. 15, 1865, Lieutenant- 
Commander Selfridge had charge of one of the three divisions of seamen. 
Assistant Surgeon Longshaw was killed in this assault. In the naval attack 
on Mobile Station, March 27, 1865, Lieut.-Com. W. W. Low commanded 
the Octarora. All these were Massachusetts officers by birth or appoint- 
ment ; but the whole number of such officers who did their duty can be 
found only in the lists in the second volume of this work, and the vast 
multitude of Massachusetts sailors cannot be preserved by name, even 
there. 

There occurred under a Massachusetts officer, on April 11, 1864, one of 
the most curious contests in war history, the assault of twenty-five hundred 
infantry upon a gunboat aground. After the repulse of Banks at Sabine 
Cross Roads, La., April 8, the naval fleet and transports had to be with- 
drawn, their rear being brought up by a light-draught monitor, the Osage, 
commanded by Captain (now admiral) Selfridge, a Massachusetts officer. 
The vessel grounding on a point, with a transport, the Black Hawk, made 
fast to her, Selfridge presently received a report of a large force of troops 
issuing from the woods. They were taken at first for Union soldiers, being 
largely dressed in blue (captured) overcoats. Selfridge at once ordered the 
crew of the Black Hawk on board the monitor ; and there ensued an hour's 
fight of the most curious description. Regiment after regiment of the 
enemy would march up, deliver its fire and then yield place to another. On 
the other hand, Selfridge would load his two eleven-inch guns with canister, 
and discharge them just as the enemy was about to fire. This fire from the 
gunboat was most destructive, but the enemy seemed to know no fear. The 
troops were Texas regiments, commanded by General Green of Texas, who 
was conspicuous, mounted on a white horse, and seemed to have the absolute 
confidence of the men. Presently he fell, and soon after the firing suddenly 
ceased and the troops retired. By this time Captain Selfridge had fired 
away nearly all his ammunition, and the woodwork of the Black Hawk was 
so riddled with bullets that the hand could not be placed anywhere without 
covering a hole. The iron shield of the pilot house of the Osage had sixty 
marks upon it. No one, however, was killed on the Union side, and only 
seven were wounded, while the Confederate loss was reported at seven 
hundred in killed and wounded, many being left on the field. Some of the 
wounded were taken on board the Osage, and reported that they had been led 



46 NARRATIVE. 



to believe that the gunboat could easily be captured, and that their confi- 
dence in their leaders was so great that they would have followed anywhere. 1 
In the remarkable naval battle of Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864, which was 
virtually a contest between the Confederate ram Tennessee, claimed as 
invulnerable, and the monitors, Admiral Porter attributes the highest merit 
of all to a Massachusetts officer, Commander (now admiral) Nicholson of 
the Manhattan, who alone pierced by his shot the formidable armor of the 
Tennessee. "The charge for the fifteen-inch gun, as regulated by the 
Bureau of Ordnance, was only thirty-five-, pounds of powder ; but Captain 
Nicholson nearly doubled it, using sixty-five pounds, taking the respon- 
sibility of bursting the gun, but proving in fact that it could bear that charge 
for a limited number of rounds. The result was that he pierced the armor 
of the ram and dispelled the illusion of Buchanan and his men, — that their 
ram was invulnerable." 2 

XII. OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

The expedition to North Carolina under General Burnside was one of 
the most important events in the early part of the war, as it afforded a 
valuable test of the new levies ; and its immediate success was striking, 
although it led to no such great final results as had been looked for. His 
force, which embarked at Annapolis on Jan. 5, 1862, included five Massa- 
chusetts regiments ; the 21st (Lieutenant-Colonel Maggi), brigaded under 
General Reno, and the following, brigaded under General Foster : the 
23d (Colonel Kurtz), the 24th or New England Guards Regiment (Col. T. 
G. Stevenson), the 25th (Colonel Upton) and the 27th (Col. H. C. Lee). 
The expedition, including about twelve thousand men in all, 3 encountered 
severe storms, arrived at Hatteras Inlet January 14, and met with great 
difficulty in crossing the bar, so that it was reported in Boston as lost. After 
landing at Roanoke Island on February 7, an advance was made early on 
February 8, the 25th Mass. being placed in the front, with Co. A, Capt. 
(afterwards general) Josiah Pickett in command, and preceding as skirmish- 

i Commander Selfridge's report, with Admiral Porter's commentaries, may be found in the latter's 
Naval History of the Civil War, p. 514. 

2 Porter's Naval History of the Civil War, p. 594. Compare p. 578 ("the only shot which pene- 
trated"). In Captain Nicholson's report (p. 584) he claims four shots from the Manhattan as "doing 
most of the real injuries she [the Tennessee] has sustained." 

3 Present for duty 12,589. (Official War Records, IX, 358.) 



OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA. 47 

ers, supported by Co. E (Capt. Thomas O'Neil). 1 All the regiments took 
part in the battle and sustained losses ; the 21st especially distinguishing 
itself by a brilliant charge, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Maggi, 
driving the Confederates from the fort. General Reno wrote : "The honor 
of entering the fort is divided between the 21st Mass. and the 51st New 
York, but all charged gallantly." This early success caused great enthu- 
siasm at the North and corresponding depression at the South. It was the 
first large capture of Confederates during the war, including 2,677 prisoners 
besides 6 forts, 40 guns and 3,000 small arms. The Richmond Examiner 
said : " The loss of an entire army at Roanoke Island is certainly the most 
fearful event of the war." The same regiments were engaged, with heavy 
losses, at New Berne (March 14). At this battle Lieut. -Col. Henry Mer- 
ritt of Salem (23d Mass.) was killed, and Acting Adjt. Frazar A. Stearns 
(21st Mass.), son of the president of Amherst College. Seventeen mem- 
bers or graduates of the college fell in this battle ; and in recognition of 
this a captured cannon, on which Colonel Clark (himself an Amherst pro- 
fessor) had mounted while cheering on his men, was presented by the 
regiment to the college. At New Berne also fell in battle Lieut. Joseph W. 
Lawton of the 27th; and a young man of the rarest promise, James Custis 
Hopkinson, private of the 44th Mass., died by disease. Major-General 
Foster in his report paid especial compliments to Col. John Kurtz of the 
23d Mass. Infantry, Col. Thomas G. Stevenson of the 24th, Col. Edwin 
Upton of the 25th and Col. H. C. Lee of the 27th, also to Maj. R. H. 
Stevenson of the 24th and Lieut. William L. Horton, adjutant of the same 
regiment. Lieutenant-Colonel Sprague of the 25th, with a portion of his 
regiment and the regimental colors, was the first to enter the city of New 
Berne. Sergt. John D. Terry of Co. E, 23d Mass., received a medal of 
honor, five years later, for gallantry in action at this battle. 

There was also an engagement at Camden, N. C, April 19, in which 
the 21st lost seven killed ; one at Trenton Bridge May 15 without loss ; 
one at Tranter's Creek June 5, in which the 24th had six killed and six 
wounded, and one at Washington, N. C, September 6, in which the same 
regiment had one killed and five wounded. There was also an engagement 
at Rawles' Mills, N. C, November 2, in which the 24th and 44th lost slightly, 

1 S. H. Putnam's Co. A, 25th Regiment. The skirmishing was done, in the opinion of Colonel Upton, 
" in a manner that would have done credit to regulars." (Official War Records, IV, 96.) 



48 NARRATIVE. 



as did the 3d (Co. I) at Plymouth, December 10. With these exceptions, 
the year was a quiet and rather disappointing one, and the whole result of 
the expedition was not quite what had been expected. It still remains a 
question whether these posts, secured on the sea-coast, should or should not 
have been sources of more aggressive activity. Col. T. A. Dodge, U. S. A., 
a high authority, thinks that they should have been thus utilized. "It 

* 

seems as if they might have annoyed the enemy by frequent excursions on 
a large scale into the country, thus drawing the troops from the front of 
. . . their comrades." 1 This was done to some extent in the Department 
of the South, but the defeat at Olustee hardly vindicated the policy. The 
Confederates had always the immense advantage of interior lines, and also 
of keeping their numbers unknown, while those of the Union forces were 
more difficult to conceal. 

Massachusetts was well represented by twelve regiments in the expedi- 
tion under General Foster, in December, 1862, to Kinston, Whitehall and 
Goldsborough, N. C, although the actual losses were not heavy. Of this 
affair, Col. Horace C. Lee, commanding brigade, says in his report: "The 
old regiments in my brigade, the 25th and 27th, sustained their previously 
well-earned reputation. The new regiments, 3d, 5th and 46th, did nobly, 
marching up steadily, and finely maintaining their line and position without 
flinching." 2 The only regiment which incurred any considerable loss at 
Kinston December 14 was the 45th, or "Cadet" Regiment (Col. C. R. 
Codman), and it again distinguished itself at Whitehall. The color-bearer, 
Sergt. Theodore Parkman, being shot down, Colonel Codman himself seized 
the colors, and advancing about ten feet before the regiment, which was 
then tying down, he lay down beside the colors. It is worthy of remem- 
brance that the corps of " Cadets " in Boston, whose number is limited to 
one hundred and ten, sent out, first and last, one hundred and twenty com- 
missioned officers to the war, and had at one time so depleted itself that 
only six active members remained on its rolls. The 23d and 45th also 
met with some considerable loss at Whitehall but neither received any 
at Goldsborough. The 17th, 24th, 43d, 44th and 51st were also in the 
expedition, making in all about half the force. 

1 Page 41. 

2 Official War Eecords, XVIII, 87. The reports of all the Massachusetts commanders will be found in 
this volume. A medal of honor was forwarded to Sergt. Andrew S. Bryant, Co. A, 46th Mass. 



OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA. 49 

On Jan. 19, 1863, five companies of the 51st Mass. Infantry were in 
action at Young's Cross Roads, N. C, but without loss. There were en- 
gagements round New Berne, one at Deep Gully March 14, 1863, when 
Colonel Pickett (25th Mass.) held an outpost with much risk but small 
loss, 1 and another March 14, when Lieut. Joseph W. Lawton of Ware 
(27th Mass.) and several others were killed. In an attack on Fort Ander- 
son May 14 Lieut. N. S. Barstow (24th Mass.), acting signal officer, 
especially compliments his flagman, Timothy S. Marsh "of Co. D, 21st 
Mass., for having behaved with admirable coolness under very severe fire ; 
and the chief signal officer, Capt. D. A. Taylor (3d N. Y. Artillery), says 
in submitting the report that Lieutenant Barstow is ' « far too modest in 
describing his own share of the work," and proceeds to give ampler details 
of its perils. 2 The Signal Corps of twenty-eight second lieutenants, de- 
tailed largely from Massachusetts regiments, was an important element in 
the North Carolina campaign. 

Two companies of the 27th (G and H), being left at Plymouth, N. C, 
on garrison duty, had an encounter at Winfield or Rocky Hoc March 23, 
1863, with slight loss. During the siege of Washington, N. C, March 30- 
April 16, Major-General Foster reports the 27th and 44th Mass. infantries 
as having "behaved nobly," though happily with small loss. He also 
complimented the 45th for ' ' the efficient and soldierly manner " in which 
they had served as provost guard at New Berne. 3 . 

On May 22, 1863, the 27th Mass. sustained some' loss at Gum 
Swamp, where it had marched fifteen miles, in single file through dense 
woods, to surprise the enemy; and on the following day Cos. A and 
I of the 46th sustained most honorably their position at an outpost 
under Colonel Jones of the 58th Pennsylvania. After this commander 
was killed the two companies held an advanced redoubt, under Captain 
Tifft, when the rest of the force had fallen back several miles; but were 
finally relieved. Ser^t: A,, S. Bryant of Co. A was made sergeant-major 
and received a medal of honor, ten years later, for "gallantry in action" 
at this engagement. 

At Bachelor's (or Batchelder's) Creek, N. C, during the defence of New 
Berne, Feb. 1-3, 1864, Lieutenant-Colonel Fellows of the 17th Mass. was 

1 See his report in Official War Records, XVIII, 187. 2 Official War Records, XVIII, 184, 186. 

s Official War Records, XVIII, 216, 220. 



50 NARRATIVE. 



sent out with one hundred and fifteen men and a section of artillery, in aid 
of a New York regiment, but was surrounded in a fog and had three of 
his little band killed, three wounded, and sixty-six taken prisoners. On 
April 17-20 the 2d Heavy Artillery had a somewhat similar experience at 
Plymouth, N. C, a large part of Cos. G and H being taken prisoners, 
many of whom died in prison. Near Washington, N. C, the 17th was 
again engaged in a skirmish, with a small loss. At the end of the year 
(December 9-12') the 27th Regiment took part in an expedition to Hamil- 
ton, N. C, with slight loss. 

In the following year (1865) a somewhat more serious affair occurred 
at Wilcox's Bridge, N. C, March 8-10, when the 17th, 23d, 25th and 27th 
Mass. infantries met with losses, as well as the 2d Heavy Artillery (five 
companies, near Kinston) ; and the 23d had also an engagement near Kin- 
ston March 14, with a small loss; but on the whole the North Carolina 
service proved less severe than was at first expected, though the loss from 
disease was considerable. 

XIII. THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN. 

On Nov. 27, 1861, Lieutenant-General Scott, being seventy-five years 
of age, retired from the command of the American army and was succeeded 
by Maj.-Gen. G. B. McClellan, who, after some delay, submitted to the 
President the plan of a campaign against Richmond. On Feb. 27, 1862, 
the Secretary of War issued orders that steamers should be ready on 
March 18 to transport the newly organized Army of the Potomac to 
Fortress Monroe, and from March 17 to April 1 the troops embarked. 
They included the following Massachusetts infantry regiments : the 1st 
(Col. Robert Cowdin), the 7th (Col. D. N. Couch), the 9th (Col. Thomas 
Cass), the 10th (Col. H. S. Briggs), the 11th (Col. George Clark, Jr.), the 
15th (Col. Charles Devens, Jr.), the 16th (Col. P. T. Wyman), the 18th 
(Col. James Barnes), the 19th (Col. E. W. Hincks), the 20th (Cdl. W. 
R. Lee), and the 22d (Col. J. A. Gove). The 1st Battery (Capt. Josiah 
Porter), the 3d (Capt. A. P. Martin), and the 5th (Capt. G. D. Allen) 
were also included in the Army of the Potomac. 

The distribution of these forces was as follows : — 



THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN. 51 

Second Army Cor'ps (Sumner). 

First Division. — 2d Brigade, 29th Mass. Infantry. Second Division. 
— 1st Brigade, 15th Mass. 3d Brigade, 19th and 20th Mass. 

Third Army Corps (Heintzelinan). 
Second Division. — 1st Brigade, 1st, 11th and 16th Mass. 

Fourth Army Corps (Keyes). 
First Division. — 3d Brigade, 7th and 10th Mass. 

Fifth Army Corps (Porter). 

First Division. — 1st Brigade, 18th and 22d Mass. ; 2d Mass. Sharp- 
shooters. 2d Brigade, 9th Mass. Artillery. — 3d and 5th Mass. bat- 
teries. 

Sixth Army Corps (Franklin). 

Artdllery. — 1st Mass. Battery. 

The whole force of the Army of the Potomac was about 100, 000. l 
The first important event in the peninsular campaign was the siege of 
Yorktown. The first assault was made, April 5, 1862, by three companies 
of the 1st Mass. with two of the 11th, under command of Lieut. -Col. 
George D. Wells, who was himself the first man to enter the lunette, 
after it had been taken at the point of the bayonet, without firing a gun. 
In his report he especially complimented Capts. Edward A. Wild, Sum- 
ner Carruth and Charles E. Rand, the two former of whom afterwards 
rose to be brigadier-generals. The national flag was planted on the works 
by Col. Jesse A. Gove of the 22d Mass. This regiment, originally re- 
cruited by the Hon. Henry Wilson, afterwards vice-president of the United 
States, 2 at once proceeded to occupy and garrison the town. 

In the battle of Williamsburg, Va., May 5, 1862, following on the 
fall of Yorktown, Maj.-Gen. Joseph Hooker, a Massachusetts officer, was 
in command, and received at this time his epithet of "Fighting Joe." 

t Official War Records, XI (1), p. 159. 

* In October, 1863, this gentleman said, " Twenty -four companies are in the field to-night, raised and 
organized by my efforts, and more than two hundred officers have entered the service bearing commissions 
secured by my influence." 



52 NAKRATIVE. 



Regiments from this State took a leading part, including the 1st, 7th and 
11th, besides the 10th, which sustained no loss. The 1st was on the skir- 
mish line and sustained its previously good character ; the 7th, a Bristol 
County regiment, under command of Col. Nelson H. Davis (succeeding Col. 
Darius N. Couch, now promoted brigadier-general), was brought forward 
most successfully at a critical juncture, and rendered much service at small 
loss, while the 11th, a regiment known as the " Boston Volunteers," under 
Colonel Blaisdell, was especially complimented by Governor Andrew for its 
gopd conduct, and the regiment received a new regimental color. Michael 
A. Dillon, of the 2d New Hampshire Infantry (Co. G.), a native of Mas- 
sachusetts, won a medal of honor in this battle. Massachusetts had a 
right also to share the laurels of the 70th New York, or 1st Excelsior Reg- 
iment, since this was commanded by a Massachusetts officer — Col. William 
D wight, Jr., one of four brothers who distinguished themselves in the 
service — and included companies from this State. After the battle of 
Williamsburg, Lieutenant-Colonel Farnum wrote to the mayor of New 
York, " under the precious rags which were once so proudly borne by the 
1st Excelsior Regiment more men have fallen in a single fight than ever 
fell under any other flag in the service of the United States. The regi- 
ment went into the field with six hundred privates and twenty-seven offi- 
cers, and more than half of the privates were killed or wounded, as were 
also twenty-three out of the twenty-seven officers." 1 

Brig. -Gen. JRufus Saxton, United States Volunteers (a Massachusetts 
officer), commanded about this time the defence of Harper's Ferry (May 
26-30) in a manner that subsequently won him a medal of honor. In 
the battle at Hanover Court House May 27, the 9th and 22d Mass., with a 
section of the 3d Battery, were in action, the 5th Battery being also present 
but not active. The 9th Mass. distinguished itself by a charge, showing in 
advance the qualities so signally tested later. The losses in this engage- 
ment were not, however, heavy. 

The battle of Fair Oaks or Seven Pines 2 (May 31-June 1) was the 

1 Townsend's Honors of the Empire State, p. 317. Plasterer, in his New York in the War of the 
Rebellion, puts the number of officers killed or wounded at twenty, and the number of privates at two 
hundred and thirteen, but reports also ninety-seven privates as missing, thus confirming the original 
statement (p. 429). 

2 " That battle ought really never to have been fought, for it had no purpose, no plan of action, no 
place in any scheme of operations. It is a question to this day which was the attacking party." (Walker's 
2d Army Corps, p. 51.) 



THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN. 53 

most important in which the Massachusetts troops had yet taken part. 
General Sedgwick's division, to which the 19th and 20th Mass. belonged, 
drove the famous Hampton Legion before it ; and the 20th, which had now 
regained from captivity Colonel Lee, Major Revere and Adjutant Pearson, 
took an especially prominent part. The 10th and 7th also charged the' 
enemy, the 10th forming four successive times under fire as regularly as if 
on the parade ground. General Hooker said in his report: "The 10th, 
commanded by Col. Henry S. Briggs of Pittsfield, son of the ex-governor, 
displayed the greatest bravery and materially checked the progress of the 
enemy." The loss of both officers and soldiers was heavy in this battle. 
There fell Lieut. J. D. Bullock of Fall River, of the 7th; Lieut. F. P. H. 
Rogers of Waltham, of the 16th; Lieut. Charles B. Warner of South Dan- 
vers, of the 19th; and Capts. Edwin E. Day of Greenfield and Elisha 
Smart of Adams, with Lieut. Benjamin F. Leland of Shelburne, all of 
the 10th Mass. 

The 16th Mass. Infantry was sent out by General Hooker to feel the 
strength of the enemy, under instructions from General McClellan, and 
was engaged at Williamsburg, Va., June 18, with a loss of twenty-nine 
killed and mortally wounded, General Hooker reporting that the duty 
was executed "in fine style;" and the 1st, 7th, 11th, 16th and 19th were 
engaged at Oak Grove June 25 with smaller losses. 1 

At the battle of Mechanicsville June 26, the 9th and 22d Mass., with 
the 1st and 3d batteries, were engaged, meeting with only slight loss ; but 
at Gaines's Mill — the first attack made in force on the Army of the Poto- 
mac (June 27-28) — these two regiments lost very heavily, more than eighty 
being killed or mortally wounded from each, while their supports, the 10th, 
15th and 29th, with the 1st, 3d and 5th batteries, suffered more slightly. It 
was at this battle that the 9th (Irish) Regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel 
Guiney, fulfilled the prophecy made by the Hon. Edward Everett in regard 
to this portion of our people. "Their cordial sympathy warrants us in 
believing that if, on some hard-fought field, should the doubtful day be 
about to turn against us, the Irish brigade (as at Fontenoy) would rush to 
the rescue ; with the terrible war-cry of Faugh-a-Ballagh they would sweep 
the foes of the Union before them, like chaff before the wind." On one 

1 Narratives of the latter battle by Colonels Cowdin and Blaisdell may be found in Official War 
Records, XI (2), pp. 124-126, and General Hooker's Report, XI (3), p. 233. 



54 NARRATIVE. 



occasion, having formed their line upon Lieutenant-Colonel Guiney and his 
two standard bearers, who advanced before them, the commander calling 
" Men, follow your colors, " they withstood nine successive charges of the 
enemy. Eleven officers of the 9th fell in that battle, including Capts. 
William Madigan, James E. McCafferty of Boston, John Carey of Marl- 
borough, Jeremiah O'Neil of Medford, with Lieuts. R. P. Nugent of 
Boston and Francis O'Dowd of Medford. The 22d lost its colonel, Jesse 
A. Gove, — the first of the Massachusetts colonels to fall, — with Capt. 
J. F. Dunning of Boston and Lieut. T. F. Salter of Haverhill of the 22d 
and Lieut. C. C. E. Mortimer of the 3d Battery. 1 More bayonet wounds 
are said to have been inflicted in the battle of Gaines's Mill than in any 
other contest of the war. 

Gen. Fitz John Porter, commanding the 5th Army Corps, wrote to 
Governor Andrew, July 26, 1862 : " No troops could have behaved better 
than did the 9th and 22d regiments and Martin's Battery [the 3d] and por- 
tions of Allen's [the 5th], or done more to add to our success." 2 

During the retreat of McClellan the Massachusetts regiments suffered 
little at Peach Orchard or at Savage's Station, but at Glendale (June 
30) and Malvern Hill (July 1) they were largely engaged, with losses 
extending through many regiments. 

At the battle of Glendale, June 30, which, in the words of the Comte 
de Paris, " was remarkable for its fierceness among all that have drenched 
the American forests with blood," General Hooker attributed the salvation 
of the army to the constancy and courage of the 16th Mass. Infantry, 
under Col. Powell T. Wyman, who had come from Europe expressly to 
offer his services to Governor Andrew, and fell at Glendale, mortally 
wounded, at the head of his regiment. 3 During the seven days' battles 
the flagstaff of the 16th was broken in three places, and was brought away 
by Color Sergeant Jonas F. Capelle, who was subsequently promoted to 
be captain. But the 1st, 19th and 20th regiments lost more men at Glen- 
dale than the 16th, Majors H. J. How 4 of the 19th and C. P. Chandler of 

1 " Every regiment Buffered, but the 22d Massachusetts most of all." (General Martindale's report, 
Official War Records, XI (2), 291 ) The reports of Maj. W. S. Tilton and Capt. W. S. Sampson are in 
the same volume, pp. 300-306. 

2 -Adjutant-General's report, January, 1863, p. 31. A report by Capt. A P. Martin, giving a spirited 
account of the action of his battery, is in Official War Records, XI (2), 284. 

8 See extract from his letter to Governor Andrew. (Adjutant-General's report, January, 1865, p. 522.) 

4 See his memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, II. 31. " One of the most valuable and brave 
officers in the service." (Brig.-Gen. N. J. T. Dana, Official War Records, XI (2), 95.) 



THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN. 55 

the 1st heading the list of some twenty officers of that grade from Massa- 
chusetts who fell in the Civil War. General Sedgwick writes, " The 19th 
Mass. (Colonel Hincks) was the first to arrive, and scarcely pausing to 
draw, gallantly dashed at the enemy." Colonel Sully, brigade commander, 
says that Lieut. -Col. J. W. Kimball commanded his regiment (the 15th) 
with great coolness and bravery. Gens. S. P. Heintzelman and C. Grover 
especially compliment the 1st and 16th Mass. Maj. D. S. Lamson, com- 
manding the 16th after the death of Colonel Wyman, compliments Cos. C 
and H. 1 General Walker says, "The 20th Mass. showed very high 
quality in the very trying circumstances under which it Went into action." 2 
Maj. P. J. Eevere (of the 20th) had two horses shot under him, and his 
services were especially recognized by General Sedgwick. Lieuts. William 
H. Sutherland of the 1st and David Lee of the 19th also died in this 
battle. 

In the battle of Malvern Hill, July 1, which was mainly a defensive 
contest and was fought with great courage on both sides from 3 to 6 p.m., 
the greatest losses fell upon the 9th Mass. Infantry and next to that upon 
the 15th. Brigade after brigade of Confederates was sent forward upon 
our line, but each was resisted and decisively defeated, the Union troops, 
when driven back, sometimes making a counter-charge and establishing a 
new line in advance of the previous one. Here Col. Thomas Cass of the 
9th was mortally wounded, and his lieutenants, John H. Rafferty and 
Edward McS weeny, were killed. General Devens, who was in this battle, 
said of Maj. Ozro Miller of Shelburne Falls (10th Mass.), who was killed 
in this fight, "I know of no one among the heroic dead more worthy to be 
mentioned by name than Major Miller." Linked with him was the memory 
of Lieut. James Jackson Lowell 3 (20th Mass.), who fell at Malvern Hill 
and had been previously wounded at Ball's Bluff, where his cousin, Lieu- 
tenant Putnam, had been killed. Brig. -Gen. I. N. Palmer, commanding 
brigade, says in his report, "The 10th Mass., after several hours' hard 
fighting, reported their ammunition exhausted, but they remained firmly 
on the field till after dark, and until the enemy was everywhere repulsed." 
Here ended the remarkable campaign of three months, in which the 
Army of the Potomac had forced its way to a point where it could see the 

> Official War Records, XI (2), 81, 88, 95, 102, 124, 129. 2 History of 2d Army Corps, p 77. 

3 See his memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 422. 



56 NARRATIVE. 



spires of Richmond and hear the clocks of the city striking, l but had then 
been driven back with seven days' fighting to the James River. Among the 
general officers from Massachusetts who had distinguished themselves in this 
prolonged contest were Hooker, Keyes and Sumner ; and among men of 
less experience, Devens. 

XIV. THE DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF. 

When General Butler, on March 20, 1862, took command of the newly 
organized Department of the Gulf, he had with him about thirteen thou- 
sand five hundred men, a considerable proportion of these being Massa- 
chusetts soldiers. His three brigades included the 30th Mass. Infantry 
(Colonel Dudley), the 31st (Colonel Gooding), the 2d, 4th and 6th Mass. 
batteries (Captains Nims, Manning 2 and Everett), Co. A, Ind. Battalion 
Mass. Cavalry (Captain Read), Co. B of the same (Captain Magee), and 
Coi C of the same (Captain Durivage). 3 Of these, the 2d Mass. Battery 
was detained at sea and did not actually arrive until May 21. 

The expectation was that this land force might be employed to take the 
forts that commanded the river, should the navy fail to reduce them. As 
a matter of fact the navy accomplished it ; but Major Whittemore of the 
30th Mass. occupied Fort St. Philip when surrendered, while Captain 
Manning, with the 4th Mass. Battery, occupied Fort Jackson. Both forts 
were afterward held by the 26th Mass. (Colonel Jones). On arrival at 
New Orleans, May 1, the 31st Mass., with a section of the 6th Mass. Bat- 
tery, were among the troops that took possession of the city. 

The 6th Mass. Battery took part in the occupation of Baton Rouge, and 
when General Williams left that town on June 20, in the unavailing hope 
of taking Vicksburg, the 30th Mass. formed a portion of the force, with 
the 2d Battery (Captain Nims) and part of the 6th Battery (Captain 
Everett) ; the rest of this last battery and C company of cavalry (2d 
Battalion) remaining behind. 4 

During the passage of Vicksburg by the navy, the eight guns of the two 



» Capt. E,. C. Derby in The Young Captain, p. 141. 

2 Succeeded, Oct. 20, 1862, by Captain Trull. 

a Captain Durivage was drowned April 23, 1862, and was succeeded by Captain Cowen. These three 
companies, at first an independent battalion, were afterwards consolidated with the 41st Mass. Infantry 
and became the 3d Mass. Cavalry (Colonel Chickering). 

* Irwin's 19th Army Corps, p. 22. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF. 57 

Massachusetts batteries were landed and placed behind the levee at Bar- 
ney's Point, and were used to reply to the heavy guns on the high bluff; 
this being the only part taken in the affair by the army. Later, in the con- 
test between the Union gunboats and the formidable rebel ram Arkansas, 
there were on board the Garondelet, when run ashore, twenty men of the 
30th Mass., under Lieut. E. A. Fiske. No casualties occurred, but the 
troops returned, July 2(3, to Baton Rouge, after having, for more than three 
months, "undergone hardships such as have seldom fallen to the lot of sol- 
diers, in a campaign whose existence is scarcely known and whose name is 
well-nigh forgotten." 1 

In the battle of Baton Rouge, Aug. 5, 1862, the Massachusetts troops 
in the Department of the Gulf came for the first time under fire. The 
attacking party comprised about three thousand men with eleven guns 
under Breckenridge, and the party of defence about two thousand five 
hundred men with eighteen guns under Williams. Among the Confeder- 
ates were many who had been under fire at Shiloh or who had defended 
Vicksburg, thus far successfully ; while Weitzel said of the Union 
forces ' ' there were ( not twelve hundred who could have marched five 
miles. None of our men had been in battle ; very few had been under 
fire." 2 The Massachusetts troops engaged were the 30th Mass. on 
the right and rear in column, supporting Nims's (2d) Battery, under 
Lieutenant Trull ; and on the centre and left the 6th Battery, under 
Lieutenant Carruth, and the 4th Battery, Captain Manning. The battle 
was short but severe, and there seems to have been confusion, sometimes 
approaching panic, on both sides. The naval vessels also took part on 
both sides, and produced some effect on the land forces. General Wil- 
liams was killed and Colonel Dudley of the 30th Mass. (a regular army 
officer) took his place. It was a drawn battle, but left the Union forces in 
such a state that the burning and evacuation of Baton Rouge were after- 
wards ordered by General Butler, though the first part of the order was 
countermanded, through the earnest remonstrance of Gen. H. E. Paine of 
Wisconsin, to whom it was intrusted. Capt. Eugene Kelty of Lawrence 
(30th Mass. Infantry) was killed in this engagement. 

It is unnecessary here to enter on the vexed question of General Butler's 
government of the conquered city from May to December, 1862. New 

> Irwin's 19th Army Corps, p. 32. » Irwin's 19th Army Corps, p. 35. 



58 NARRATIVE. 



Orleans itself was practically held by the presence of the navy, which had 
captured it ; for the whole policy of the Confederates throughout the war 
was to abstain from all serious attempts to retake points within reach of 
the salt water, where the navy held control, but rather to let go what was 
lost and confine themselves to interior lines, where they were strong. They 
were willing to have it understood that they menaced such points, and New 
Orleans most of all, but there is no reason to suppose that they had any 
serious purpose of retaking it, any more than of recapturing Port Royal 
or Fernandina. It appears from the Confederate correspondence in Official 
War Records that there were from time to time propositions of this kind 
from hot-headed officers, as Gens. John M. Huger and David Ruggles, 
but that these were uniformly repressed by General Beauregard on the 
simple ground that the gunboats made it absolutely impossible. " So long 
as the enemy has command of the river with his gunboats, the recovery of 
New Orleans must depend upon our taking St. Louis, Louisville, Cincin- 
nati, Washington and Baltimore, which I think could be done before long 
by a proper combination of, our still latent forces and resources." 1 In 
other words, five large Northern cities must be taken first ! " Meanwhile," 
he adds, "a proper organization of our State forces can keep the enemy 
within the limits of this desirable end." 1 The correspondence of the Con- 
federate War Department with both Beauregard and Ruggles seems to 
imply that they kept thoroughly within this last reasonable view. 2 On 
land they had every advantage ; within the fire of the gunboats they were 
powerless. Their recapture of Galveston was not an exception, since the 
Union forces had merely occupied a wharf. No one doubts the great 
energy exhibited by General Butler in assuming and exercising his juris- 
diction, half civil, half military, over the city of New Orleans, and in the 
then state of the public mind at the North the more obnoxious he made his 
rule the better ; but it was essentially the government of a civil ruler, 
though under military and naval protection, and however well or ill accom- 
plished lies apart from the present narrative, while the battles and skir- 
mishes growing out of it find a proper place here. 

At the time of the battle of Baton Rouge, Aug. 5, 1862, it is probable 
that Butler's whole active force did not exceed seven thousand men, having 

i Official War Records, XV, 794. 

a Official War Records, XV, 792, 793, 799, 806, 807, 817, 840. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF. 59 

been reduced almost one-half by disease and other losses since he first 
entered New Orleans. He was promised recruits in the autumn, but knew 
nothing farther ; and it was not until he and General Banks met in New 
Orleans pn December 15 that Butler knew himself superseded. 1 

President Lincoln had been strongly impressed with the remarkable 
energy shown by Banks when appointed in command of the defences of 
Washington, under McClellan, at the close of Pope's campaign. "Within 
forty-eight hours a mob of thirty thousand wounded men and convalescents, 
who knew not where to go, and of stragglers, who meant not to go where 
they were wanted, was cleared out of the streets of Washington and pan- 
demonium was at an end. Order was rather created than restored, since 
none had existed in any direction. . . . Less than two months later, in 
the closing days of the month of October, President Lincoln sent for 
Banks and said, ' You have let me sleep in peace for the first time since I 
came here. I want you to go to Louisiana and do the same thing there.'" 2 
With thirty-nine regiments of infantry, six batteries of artillery and one 
battalion of cavalry, Banks sailed from New York, under sealed orders, 
on December 4, and reached Ship Island on Dec. 13, 1862. Unfortunately, 
twenty-one of his regiments were enlisted for only nine months, of which 
time many weeks had in some cases expired. Of these regiments many 
were from Massachusetts, and of the general officers now ordered to report 
to him, two, Brig.-Gens. George L. Andrews and William Dwight, Jr., 
were Massachusetts men, the first of these becoming ultimately chief of 
staff to General Banks. 

General Banks's career in Louisiana began with a success and a failure, — 
the evacuation of Baton Rouge by the Confederates and their recapture of 
Galveston, which had been occupied and then retaken under peculiar cir- 
cumstances. The 42d Infantry (Colonel Burrell) had the curious expe- 
rience, just after it had reached the front, of having three of its companies 
besieged and captured on a wharf at Galveston — a point then deserted — 
by a greatly superior force of Confederates, and of having, for a body of 
wholly raw soldiers, come out of the affair with honor. They were ordered 
by General Banks, Dec. 19, 1862, to proceed from New Orleans to Galveston 

1 Irwin, 19th Army Corps, p. 60. 

2 Irwin, p. 56. For Banks's surprise at his appointment, see Gordon's Brook Farm to Cedar Moun- 
tain, p. 29. For the view taken of Banks by foreign observers, see Comte de Paris (translation), I, 264; 
Gurowski's Diary, I, 100, 148, 195. 



60 NAERATIVE. 



and occupy it, the remainder of the regiment to follow when arrived from 
the North. Arriving at Galveston Colonel Burrell was advised by the 
naval officers at the station to take up regimental quarters in an unoccu- 
pied building on a wharf, with their assurance that the gunboats could repel 
any possible attack from a force however large. Early in the morning of 
Jan. 1, 1863, an attack was made by the enemy and several Confederate 
gunboats and a ram entered the harbor. A hard fight took place, and 
meanwhile Colonel Burrell placed his men behind barricades on the wharf, 
and they defended themselves with courage, but not being adequately 
sustained by the gunboats they were compelled to surrender, the enemy's 
force turning out many times larger than their own, and having many 
pieces of artillery. The 42d had five killed and fifteen wounded. In ac- 
knowledgment of the creditable course of the little band, Colonel Burrell 
was requested to keep his sword, and all private property of officers and 
enlisted men was respected. Seven officers and two hundred and thirty- 
seven privates were taken prisoners, but were paroled February 18, at 
Alexandria, La., whither they had been marched one hundred and twenty- 
five miles, and were subsequently ordered to form a paroled camp at 
Bayou Gentilly, where they were detained during the rest of their term 
of service, except the chaplain, who was immediately released. 

The first battle of the 19th Army Corps took place at Bisland, in 
Louisiana, on April 13, 1863. It consisted of an attack on the line of 
breastworks thrown up by the Confederates on each side of the Teche, 
the brigade commanded by Colonel Gooding of the 31st and including his 
regiment. The 31st carried some rifle-pits in the wood by a spirited charge, 
in which they took two officers and eighty-four men prisoners. Colonel 
Gooding's main line was formed by the 38th Mass. deployed as skirmish- 
ers, followed by the 53d Mass., the regiments replacing each other when 
the ammunition was expended. As the fight went on, the 4th Mass. was 
sent forward to the skirmish line. The announcement of General Grover's 
arrival led to a cessation of the fire, and a general attack was ordered for 
the next morning ; but during the night the works were evacuated and they 
were occupied without difficulty in the morning, the 53d Mass. being the 
first to plant its flag on the left bank. 1 The 38th Mass. headed the list 
of casualties with six killed and thirty-nine wounded, the 31st and 53d 

1 Irwin, p. 101. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF. 61 

infantries and 6th Battery also suffering losses, the list including Capt. 
Samuel Gault of the 38th and Lieut. G. G. Nutting of the 53d. The 
corps flag of the 19th Corps — blue with a white star and the figures in 
red — was carried for the first time in this engagement. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Rodman (38th Mass.) mentioned "a case of marked 
coolness and gallantry on the part of Private Patrick Smith (Co. D, 38th 
Mass.), who, coming suddenly upon three rebels in the wood upon the 
right, shot one of them and compelled the other two to surrender, and 
brought them both in as prisoners." 1 

About this same time, Lieut. Chas. S. Sargent, volunteer aide-de-camp 
to General Banks, went to communicate with Admiral Farragut and found 
Admiral Porter at the mouth of Red River. He brought the report that 
Porter had captured Grand Gulf and Grant had begun his victorious march 
on Vicksburg. 2 Capt. Howard Dwight, assistant adjutant-general at the 
headquarters of General Banks, was shot and killed by guerillas at Bayou 
Boeuf, May 4, 1863, after having surrendered while riding to the front. 
His brother, Brig. -Gen. Wm, Dwight, Jr., was ordered by General Banks 
to arrest one hundred white persons in the vicinity and send them to Iv&tt 
Orleans, to be confined as hostages for the arrest of the assassins. 3 There 
were not so many white men in that whole region, and the offenders were 
never brought to justice, though the act was disavowed and condenmed 
by the Confederate officers. Another brother, Maj. Wilder Dwight, had 
already fallen at Antietam. 

In the siege of Port Hudson, Colonel Chickering (41st Mass. Infantry) 
marched, May 21, from Barre's Landing with a force consisting of his own 
regiment, — now mounted as cavalry on prairie horses, — the 52d Mass. 
Infantry, four Maine and New York regiments and a section of the 2d Mass. 
Battery under Lieutenant Snow. His column was to cover in the march 
"the long train that stretched for eight miles over the prairies, with a 
motley band of five thousand negroes, two thousand horses and fifteen 
hundred beeves for a cumbrous accompaniment. With the possible ex- 
ception of the herd that set out to follow Sherman's march through 
Georgia, this was perhaps the most curious column ever put into motion 

i Colonel Gooding's report, Official War Records, XV, 348. 

2 Official War Records, XV, 311. Irwin, p. 144. (This is the present professor of horticulture ir 
Harvard University.) 

s Official War Records, XV, 312, 1119. Irwin, pp. 145, 146. 



62 NARRATIVE. 



since that which defiled after Noah into the ark." 1 It sustained some 
slight attacks only, and in its last thirty-one hours marched forty-eight 
miles, reaching Brashear May 28. 

On May 21, 1863, an encounter took place, with some loss, at Plains 
Store, La., in which a brisk artillery fire was interchanged, followed by a 
charge from the Confederates, of which the 48th Mass. (Col. E. F. Stone) 
bore the brunt, being sustained by the 49th Mass. (Col. W. F. Bartlett). 
The loss was not, however, large. 

i 

In both the two assaults on Port Hudson (May 27 and June 14, 1863) 
the regiment suffering most severely was the 38th (Colonel Ingraham), the 
loss beginning with Lieut. -Col. W. L. Rodman of New Bedford, who com- 
manded on the second day. 2 Next to this in losses came the 53d (Colonel 
Kimball), which suffered heavily on both days, the 31st (Colonel Gooding), 
the 49th (Colonel Bartlett), the 4th (Colonel Walker), the 48th (Colonel 
Stone), the 50th (Colonel Messer) and the 52d (Colonel Greenleaf). 

When the assault on Port Hudson was ordered for the 27th, a stormins 
party of two hundred volunteers was called for, nearly half that number 
c&iiiijig from the 48th Mass. Lieut. -Col. James O'Brien of that regiment 
(of Charlestown, Mass.) was assigned to the leadership of the party, 
which contained fifteen line officers and seventy-seven enlisted men of 
the regiment. Of these, one-half were to carry fascines and cotton bags 
for filling "the ditch, while the 48th and 49th Mass., with other regiments, 
were- to support them. When the order was given for the stormers to 
advance, O'Brien shook hands with the officer who brought it, and turning 
to his men, who were sitting or lying about him, said in the coolest and 
most business-like manner, "Pick up your bundles and come on ! " The 
whole corps was at once put in motion. "A truly magnificent sight," 
^says the historian of the 19th Army Corps, "was the advance of these 
battalions, with their colors flying and borne sturdily toward the front, 
yet not for long. Hardly had the movement begun when the whole force 
— officers, men, colors, stormers and all — found themselves inextricably 
entangled in the dense abatis under a fierce and continuous discharge of 
musketry and a withering cross-fire of artillery. Besides the field-pieces 
bearing directly down the road, two twenty-four pounders poured upon 
their flank a storm of missiles of all sorts, with fragments of railway bars 

1 Irwin, p. 156. a See memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 64. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF. 63 

and broken chain for grape, and rusty nails a'nd the raking of the scrap- 
heap for canister. No part of the column ever passed beyond the abatis, 
nor was it even possible to extricate the troops in any order without greatly 
adding to the list of casualties, already of a fearful length." 1 

Lieutenant-Colonel O'Brien was killed in this engagement and the greater 
part of his little party was killed or wounded. But the most conspicuous 
figure on the field on May 27 was Colonel Bartlett of the 49th, who, having 
lost a leg in the Peninsular, insisted upon advancing on horseback for the 
half-mile before the works, over the roughest possible field, repeatedly 
floundering to his horse's neck amid the roots and rubbish, and waving his 
sword to encourage his men. The only mounted figure among so many, 
he commanded such admiration among his opponents that the sharpshoot- 
ers forbore to fire upon him, as was afterwards stated by his friend and 
biographer, General Palfrey. 2 After he was wounded, Maj. Charles T. 
Plunkett took command of the regiment, and being a man of uncommon 
height, he too offered a good mark for the enemy, but escaped unhurt. 
Out of eighteen officers of the 49th who went into the fight eleven were 
wounded. 

In the second assault on Port Hudson (June 14), the chief loss fell on 
the 38th and 53d Mass. infantries, though it was also shared by the 4th, 
31st, 48th, 49th and 52d, the 50th being held in reserve. Gen. H. E. 
Paine of Wisconsin led the assault, deploying the 4th Wisconsin and 8th 
New Hampshire as skirmishers, placing the 4th Mass. behind them with 
improvised hand-grenades, made of six-pounder shells. Then the_38th and 
53d Mass. were formed in line of battle. At the head of the infantry 
column the 31st Mass., likewise deployed, carried cotton bags to fill the 
ditch. At the onset, Paine fell by the first discharge ; some of the 38th 
Mass. (with some of the two New Hampshire and Wisconsin regiments) 
gained the ditch and a few even climbed the parapet, but of these nearly all 

1 Irwin's 19th Army Corps, p. 180. He continues : " Banks was all for putting Dudley over the open 
ground directly in his front, but before anything could be done came the bad news from the left, and at 
last it was clear to 'the most persistent that the day was miserably lost. When, after nightfall, the division 
commanders reported at headquarters, among the wounded under the great trees, it was known that the 
result was even worse than the first accounts. . . . Worse than all, if possible, the confidence, that but a 
few hours before had run so high, was rudely shaken. It was long indeed before the men felt the same 
faith in themselves, and it is but the plain truth to say that their reliance on the department commander 
never quite returned." The aggregate of killed, wounded and missing was nearly two thousand (1,995), 
with scarcely any loss on the other side. 

2 Palfrey's Bartlett, 83. 



64 



NARRATIVE. 



were made prisoners. " The rear of the column fell back to the cover of 
the hill, while all those who had gained the crest were forced to lie there, 
exposed to a pitiless fire of sharpshooters, and the scarcely more endurable 
rays of the burning sun of Louisiana, until night came and brought relief." 1 
On June 15, 1863, after the formidable repulse which had occurred, 
General Banks issued an order congratulating his troops and calling for a 
storming party of one thousand volunteers, promising that every one so 
serving should receive a medal and should have his name placed upon a roll 
of honor in General Orders. Col. H. W. Birge of the 13th Connecticut at 
once volunteered to lead the party, and in spite of a good deal of disap- 
proval, the ranks were more than filled in a few days. The surrender of 
Vicksburg, followed closely by that of Port Hudson, rendered unnecessary 
the sacrifice demanded of the stormers, but they had the honor of entering 
the fort in advance of all others, 2 and their names are preserved in a roll 
of honor, including, as given by the historian of the 19th Army Corps, a 
series of Massachusetts names, which will be found in a note. 3 There is 



1 Irwin's 19th Army Corps, p. 197. He continues : " In this unfortunate situation the sufferings of the 
wounded became so unbearable, and appealed so powerfully to the sympathy of their comrades, that many 
lives were risked and some lost in the attempt to alleviate the thirst, at least, of these unfortunates. Two 
men, quite of their own accord, took a stretcher and tried to reach the point where Gen. H. E. Paine lay, 
but the attempt was unsuccessful and cost both of them their lives. These heroes were E. P. Woods of 
Co. E of the 8th New Hampshire and John Williams of Co. D, 31st Mass. Not less nobly, Patrick 
H. Cohen, a private soldier of the 133d New York, himself lying wounded on the crest, cut a canteen 
from the body of a dead comrade and, by lengthening the strap, succeeded in tossing it within reach of 
his commander; this probably preserved Paine's life, for unquestionably many of the more seriously 
hurt perished from the heat and from thirst on that fatal day." 2 Irwin, p. 232. 

» Port Hudson Forlorn Hope (Massachusetts names), under G. 0. 49, Department of the Gulf, June 
15, 1863 : — 

3d Massachusetts Cavalry^ 



Colonel Thomas E. Chickering. 
Captain John L. Swift, 

" Francis E. Boyd, . 
Lieutenant William T. Hodges, 

" t Henry S. Adams (Adjutant) 
" David P. Muzzey, . 

" Charles W. C. Rhoades, 
Sergeant-Major William S. Stevens. 
Private Ferdinand Rolle, . 
Sergeant Nathan G. Smith, 

"' Horace P. Flint, . 
Corporal George D . Cox, . 
Private Joseph Elliott, -, . 

" Edward Johnson, . 
Corporal Patrick Dunlay, . 
Sergeant Jason Smith, 

" Patrick S. Curry, 
Private Simon Daly, . 

" Peter Donahue, 



C 
H 
C 

G 
H 

A 
C 
C 
C 
C 
C 
G 
G 
G 
G 
G 



Private James Gallagher, . 
" John Granville, 
" James McLaughlin, 
" Solomon Hall, 
Sergeant William Wildman, 
" John Kelly, . 
" George E. Long, . 
Corporal William S. Caldwell, 
" Randall F. Hunhewell 
" William P. Pethie, 
" Charles Miller, . 
" William R. Davis, 
Private Edwin T. Ehrlacher, 
" Gros Granadino, . 
" Eli Hawkins, 
" Patrick J. Monks, 
" John Veliscross, . 
" George Wilson, 



G 
G 
G 
G 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 



THE DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF. 



65 



some uncertainty about several of these names, but as Irwin's list is the 
latest, and was obtained by collation of several different lists, I have taken 
it in preference to that issued by the Forlorn Hope Association (Lieut. -Col. 
D. P. Muzzey of Cambridge, president) or that in Official War Records. 4 



13th Massachusetts Battery. 
Private Cesar Da Bois. Private John V. Warner. 

26th Massachusetts. 
Lieutenant Seth Bonner, Co. F. 



30th Massachusetts. 



Captain Edward A. Fiske, 
Lieutenant Thomas B. Johnston 
" Nathaniel K. Reed, 

" Ferdinand C. Poree 

Sergeant W. H. H. Richards, 
Corporal George E. Coy, . 
" Thomas Courtney, 
Private James M. Brown, . 
" Andrew Cole, 
" Martin Hassett, 
" George Toowey, . 
Sergeant Luther H. Marshall, 
Private William McCutcheon, 
" Charles B. Richardson, 
" George Sutherland, 
Sergeant George H. Moule, 
" John E. Ring, . 



Captain Edward P. Hollister, . 

" Samuel D. Hovey, 
Lieutenant Luther C. Howell (Adjutant) 

" James M. Stewart, . 

Private Chester Bevins, 

" Patrick Carnes, 



D 
H 
C 
C 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
C 
C 
C 
C 
D 
D 



Corporal Charles D. Moore, . D 

Private James Boyce, D 

" William Kenny, D 

" Horace F. Davis E 

Sergeant Murty Quinlan, F 

" Thomas A. Warren F 

Corporal Michael Mealey, F 

Private J. Sullivan, F 

Sergeant John Leary, G 

" Willard A. Hussey, . H 

Private John Battles, H 

" John Higgins, H 

" Paul Jessemaughn H 

" William F. Kavanagh, . H 

" John Welch H 

" John Wilson, H 

Sergeant Samuel Ryan, I 



31st Massachusetts. 



A 
K 

A 
A 
A 



Private Frank Fitch, . 

" William Thorington, 
" Peter Valun, . 
" Ethan H. Cowles, . 
" William J. Coleman, 
" Maurice Lee, . 



A 
A 
A 
B 
K 
K 



38th Massachusetts. 
Lieutenant Frank N. Scott, Co. D. 



48th Massachusetts. 
Private Michael Roach, Co. G. 



49th Massachusetts. 



Lieutenant Edson F. Dresser, 
Private James W. Bassett, 
" William E. Clark, 
" Willard L. Watkins, 
" George Dowley, . 
" Henry E. Griffin, . 
" Conrad Heins, 
Corporal Thomas H. Hughes, 
Private Peter Come, . . 



F 
A 
A 
A 
B 
B 
B 
D 
D 



Private Edwin N. Hubbard, 
" Franklin Allen, 
" George Knickerbocker, 

Corporal John Kelley, 

Private Zera Barnum, 

" Philander B. Chad wick 
" Thomas Maloney, 
" Albert F. Thompson, 



Corporal E. S. Tubbs, 



Private Peter T. Downs, 



50th Massachusetts. 

. G | Private James Miller, 



53d Massachusetts. 
. . • G | Private Peter Dyer, 

« Official War Records, XXVI (1), 57. 



D 
H 
H 
I 
I 
K 
K 
K 



G 



H 



66 NARRATIVE. 



It is to be noted that the storming column had been organized into two 
battalions, one of ten and one of eight companies, each with captain and 
lieutenants and about fifty men. The senior and junior majors of the 1st 
battalion were Massachusetts officers, Capts. E. P. Hollister and S. D. 
Hovey (both of 31st Mass. Infantry). The commander of the 6th com- 
pany, 1st battalion, was Lieut. L. C. Howell, adjutant of the 31st Mass. 
Infantry ; while the 10th company was commanded by Capt. E. A. Fiske 
(30th Mass. Infantry), and had three Massachusetts lieutenants, N. K. 
Eeed and T. B. Johnston (30th Mass.), with James Stewart (31st Mass.). 
In the 2d battalion, the 7th company was commanded by Capt. Francis E. 
Boyd, and had for lieutenants, TV. T. Hodges, D. P. Muzzey and C. TV. C. 
Rhoades, — all four of the 3d Mass. Cavalry. 1 All these, though not actu- 
ally called into service, are as much entitled to honor as if they had been ; 
and it is to be deeply regretted that we have not an equally complete list 
of the smaller storming party of the first attack, who fought or fell with 
the brave O'Brien. 

At La Fourche Crossing (June 21, 1863) Lieut. -Col. Albert Stickney 
(47th- Mass.), whom Irwin terms "a very intelligent and spirited young 
officer," and who had been for these qualities put in command of the dis- 
trict, met and defeated a Confederate attack with a small force made up 
of the troops of seven different States, including fragments of the 26th and 
42d Mass. Infantry. In the battle of Franklin, during the siege of Vicks- 
burg (July 9, 1863), the 29th, 35th and 36th Mass. were engaged, the 
35th making a dash into the town and planting its flag upon the court- 
house, In that campaign fell Capt. Ezra Ripley of the 29th, who died 
of exhaustion and overwork. 2 The engineering operations, both at Port 
Hudson and Vicksburg, were largely under the direction of Massachusetts 
officers, — Capt. John C. Palfrey in the former case and Maj. Cyrus B. 
Comstock in the latter. 

4 

In the ill-fated and objectless battle of Cox's plantation, or Bayou La 
Fourche, July 13, 1863, Colonel Dudley (30th Mass.) was sent out with 
two sections of the 6th Mass. Battery (Carruth's) along the right bank of 
a bayou, supported by Gen. Charles J. Paine. Col. J. S. Morgan, moving 
on the other side of the bayou, was surprised and driven back by the Con- 

i Irwin does not include this list, which is issued on a separate sheet by the Forlorn Hope Association. 
a See his memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 107. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF. 67 

federate General Green, and fell back on Dudley, both being forced a mile 
in retreat, until supported by General Paine and ultimately withdrawn by 
General Grover. Colonel Morgan was ultimately tried and sentenced by 
court-martial, though this sentence was suspended by General Banks. It 
was afterwards claimed by the Confederate commander that he lost thirty- 
three and the Union force one thousand, but Irwin puts this last amount at 
four hundred and sixty-five, about forty-eight of which fell on the 30th 
Mass. The 6th Battery had one man wounded and lost one gun, " without 
the least fault on the part of the artillerists," says Irwin. 1 

After General Sherman was wounded at Port Hudson, Gen. Wm. 
Dwight, Jr., showed great energy in pushing forward the left of the Union 
line. The troops brigaded under him (1st brigade, 1st division, 19th 
Army Corps) were not,' however, from his own State, nor were many of 
them engaged in the important twin battles of Sabine Cross Roads and 
Pleasant Hill, April 8-9, 1864. The Massachusetts troops actually in- 
volved were the 3d and 31st Mass. infantries (the latter mounted) and the 
2d and 13th batteries, brigaded under Colonel Dudley and assigned to the 
cavalry division. They lost in all about eighteen killed and about one 
hundred and fifty wounded, missing or prisoners. 

In the battle which took place at the crossing of Cane River, La., April 
23, 1864, the 31st and 38th Mass. infantries were again engaged with loss, 
the 3d Cavalry with some wounded (during several days of skirmishing) 
and the 13th Battery without loss. 2 This was the last pitched battle fought 
before the transfer of the 19th Army Corps from Louisiana to Virginia, 
where it was to take part in the Shenandoah campaign. 

There were, however, various smaller encounters. In a reconnois- 
sance at the end of April, 1864, the 31st Mass. Infantry formed a part 
of the advance during the outward march and was the rear guard in 
returning, having encounters, with slight losses, at Alexandria April 26, 
at Hudnot's and at Governor Moore's plantations May 1-2, 1864. The 3d 
Mass. Cavalry, at the same time, was attacked by Quantrell's guerillas near 
Alexandria and lost four men. Both regiments were also engaged, during 
the disastrous march down the Red River May 13-18, with losses, by which 
the 31st especially suffered, at Yellow Bayou having eight killed and 

1 Irwin, p. 253. 

2 For some reason Irwin fails to give his usual accurate statistics on this occasion. He, however, 
mentions the 38th Mass. as present (pp. 328, 331) 



68 NARRATIVE. 



twenty-four wounded. The losses on the Confederate side were, however, 
far greater, thus mitigating the close of a campaign which had been, on 
the whole, disastrous. On June 24, Grant ordered the transfer of the 19th 
Army Corps to Virginia ; the Massachusetts troops still left in Louisiana 
being the 3d Mass. Cavalry, the 31st Infantry (mounted), and the 4th, 7th 
and 15th light batteries. All of these except the 3d Cavalry served under 
General Canby afterwards at the siege of Mobile, Ala., March 20-April 12, 
1865. 1 

XV. THE ARMY OF VIRGINIA UNDER POPE. 

While McClellan was still before Richmond, a new army organization 
called the Army of Virginia was formed June 26, 1862, out of the three 
corps of Banks, Fremont and McDowell, which had hitherto acted inde- 
pendently of each other between Washington and the Shenandoah valley. 2 
The three corps made about thirty-eight thousand men, afterwards in- 
creased by additions. They were placed under the command of Maj.-Gen. 
John Pope, who unfortunately forfeited confidence in advance by a rather 
bombastic proclamation. One of his first acts was to order a meeting 
between Banks and Sigel (who had succeeded Fremont), his corps com- 
manders, at Culpepper on Aug. 8, 1862, and as Sigel failed to arrive, 
Banks attacked, the next day at Cedar Mountain, the army under " Stone- 
wall" Jackson, at first successfully then unsuccessfully, meeting at last 
with heavy loss. Banks was greatly outnumbered, but "attacking with 
much vigor but without much discretion he almost compassed a victory." 3 
Though- but a single Massachusetts regiment (the 2d, Colonel Andrews) 
was actively engaged, it was a battle most disastrous to the State. Out of 
twenty-three commissioned officers, only eight escaped unhurt, while one- 
half the non-commissioned officers and nearly one-third of the enlisted men 
were killed or wounded. Maj. James Savage, Jr., Capts. Eichard Cary 
and Edward G. Abbott, W. B. Williams and R. C. Goodwin, with Lieut. 
Stephen G. Perkins, were all killed, 4 and Surgeon Leland was severely 
wounded; Maj. James Savage, Jr., and Capts. Samuel M. Quincy and 

1 Irwin's 19th Army Corps, p. 463 

2 " Petty armies under more petty commanders." (Walker's 2d Army Corps, p. 56.) "Moving about 
in an independent and ineffectual way." (Rossiter Johnson's Short History, p. 172.) 

3 Dodge's Bird's Eye View, etc., p. 71. 

4 See the memoirs of Abbott, Goodwin, Perkins and Savage in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 
294,328,395; 11,82. 



THE ARMY OF VIRGINIA UNDER POPE. 69 



Henry S. Kussell were made prisoners of war, the first named dying of his 
wounds. 

The 2d Mass. Infantry was the first three years' regiment raised in the 
State, and received from its first commander, Col. (afterwards general) 
George H. Gordon, — himself a graduate of West Point, — a standard of 
drill and discipline which it never lost. Colonel (afterwards general) 
Andrews, its second commander, was also a graduate of the academy. 
In General Gordon's account of this battle he especially compliments Col- 
onel Andrews, Maj. Wilder Dwight 1 and Lieuts. Henry B. Scott and 
Charles P. Horton. 

The 12th Mass. Infantry (Colonel Webster) acted as a support in the 
battle of Cedar Mountain, and there lost Capts. John Ripley and Nathan- 
iel B. Shurtleff. The company commanded by Captain Shurtleff was 
peculiarly the company of the Boston Latin School, and his death recalled 
the dignified and tender way in which he had spoken of its possibility 
when receiving the standard given to his company by that school. 2 At 
that early period of the war, when the public mind was not yet inured 
to such calamities, the battle of Cedar Mountain created, especially in 
Massachusetts, a sense of loss and sorrow surpassing that produced by 
many larger conflicts later in the war. 

The engagements at Kelley's Ford, Rappahannock, Kettle Run and 
Groveton in August cost little to the few Massachusetts regiments engaged, 
but the second battle of Bull Run (Manassas), fought by Pope on his re- 
treat Aug. 30, 1862, involved a number of Massachusetts regiments in 
action and nine in actual losses. The severest occurred in that celebrated 
charge by Hooker's brigade, which included the 1st, 11th and 16th Mass. 
infantries. In this charge the 16th lost seven officers and one hundred and 
twelve men killed and wounded in fifteen minutes, and it was estimated 
that of the two thousand who took part in the charge, more than one- 
quarter were disabled. Col. Wm. Blaisdell says of this charge: "The 
11th Regiment, being the battalion of direction, was the first to reach the 
railroad, and of course received the heaviest of the enemy's fire. This 
staggered the men an instant, but recovering they gave a wild hurrah and 

1 A vivid description of the battle may be found in the Life and Letters of Wilder Dwight, p. 278 ; 
and others in Gordon's Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, p. 284, and Walcott's 21st Massachusetts, 
p. 127. The report of Col. G. L. Andrews (2d Mass.) is in Official War Records, XII (2), 153. 

3 See his memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, II, 44. 



70 NARRATIVE. 



over they went, mounting the embankment, driving everything before 
them at the point of the bayonet." 1 Brig. -Gen. C. Grover, commanding 
brigade, says that the " 11th and 16th Mass. have under every trial 
won new distinction." Lieut. Hiram B. Banks of the 16th was killed 
in this charge, as were also Lieut.-Col. George F. Tileston, Capt. Ben- 
jamin Stone and Lieut. William R. Porter of the 11th. Capt. Charles 
W. Carroll and Lieuts. Pardon Almy and J. E. Simmons of the 18th 
fell also in this battle; Col. Fletcher Webster and Capt. Richard H. 
Kimball of the 12th; together with three lieutenants, J. M. Mandeville of 
the 1st, Bartlett Shaw of the 29th and William H. Flynn of the 28th. It 
was upon the 18th Mass. that the heaviest losses of all fell. Maj. (after- 
wards general) G. L. Andrews, U. S. A., a Massachusetts officer com- 
manding the 17th U. S. Infantry, especially compliments in his report 
the services of Lieut, (afterwards captain) W. W. Swan, U. S. A., also 
of Massachusetts. 

At Chantilly, Sept. 1, 1862, fell prematurely a Massachusetts officer, 
Gen. Isaac I. Stevens, who had left West Point, it is said, with higher 
honors than had been won by any previous graduate. He led an attack on 
foot at the head of the 79th New York, a Scotch regiment. The fire was 
severe and the color-sergeant was wounded, when General Stevens took the 
colors, calling, "We are all Highlanders ; follow, my brave Highlanders." 
He was almost instantly struck and kiljed by a bullet in the right temple, 
this being, as he had previously said, the death he had most wished to die. 
There also died at Chantilly, Lieut.-Col. Joseph P. Rice of the 21st, 
with Capt. John D. Frazer, and Lieuts. Henry A. Beckwith, Frederick A. 
Bemis and William B. Hill, also Lieut. Alexander Barrett of the 28th. 
The losses fell upon these two regiments, especially on the 21st, which 
lost thirty-eight killed and mortally wounded out of four hundred. The 
8th Mass. Battery was also engaged, but without loss. 

On the following day, September 2, General Pope was withdrawn; he 
returned to Washington and his army was merged in the Army of the 
Potomac. His boastful early proclamations, with their very inadequate 
result, threw a cloud over his whole campaign ; but that accomplished pro- 
fessional critic, Col. T. A. Dodge, says that "from Cedar " Mountain to 



1 Official War Records, XII (2), 441. 



THE ANTIETAM CAMPAIGN. 71 

Chantilly the conduct of our troops stands out in brilliant relief from the 
tactics of their commanders." 1 

There happened afterwards at the Potomac fords a few small affairs in 
which the 1st Mass. Cavalry took part, especially at Monocacy Ford, near 
Poolesville, September 5, where one of its companies was sharply attacked 
by Longstreet's cavalry and had a few killed or wounded and lost some 
prisoners ; 2 but nothing more serious occurred before the opening of the 
Antietam campaign. 

XVI. THE ANTIETAM CAMPAIGN. 

On July 4, 1862, the President had called for three hundred thousand 
troops, and Governor Andrew, on July 7, for fifteen thousand. Within 
two months nine new three-years regiments had been filled (from the 33d 
to the 41st), besides the 9th and 10th batteries, and some four thousand 
recruits for old regiments. On August 4 the reverses of McClellan and 
Banks led to a new call for three hundred thousand nine-months troops, to 
be raised by draft if necessary ; and seventeen Massachusetts militia regi- 
ments, numbering more than sixteen thousand men, were called out or 
enlisted for that term of service. These were the 6th, which was again 
first in the field, the 3d, 4th, 5th and 8th — all these being regiments that 
had already served — and twelve new nine-months regiments, from the 
42d to the 53d inclusive. To these was added the 11th Battery ; all this 
being the Work of a single year. As one means of promoting the neces- 
sary enlistments, Governor Andrew recommended, August 23, that busi- 
ness should be suspended in the towns and cities of the Commonwealth for 
one week, in order that the citizens should devote their whole time to fill- 
ing the required quota. As a result, no draft became necessary until nearly 
a year later, June, 1863, and not then upon any very large scale. 

At the battle of South Mountain, September 14, the prelude to Antie- 
tam, the 12th, 13th, 21st, 28th and 35th Mass. infantries were engaged, 
with the 1st and 8th batteries. General McClellan wrote of this battle, 
as a whole, " The troops behaved magnificently. They never fought 
better." 3 The 12th and 28th infantries and the 1st Battery lost one killed 

i Bird's Eye View, p. 80. For the demoralization of the army under Pope, see Walcott's 21st Mass. 
Infantry, p. 128. 

2 Official War Records, XIX (2), 185. a Official War Records, XIX (2), 289. 



72 NARRATIVE. 



each, and the 35th Mass. lost five, including one officer, Lieut. Charles F. 
Williams of Salem. An injury to it, even more serious, was the loss of 
an arm by its commander, Colonel (afterwards general) Wild, his other 
arm being also partially disabled, — this permanently withdrawing him 
from his regiment, though he became afterwards a general officer. 

The Massachusetts regiments engaged at Antietam September 16-17 
were (actively) the 2d, 12th, 13th, 15th, 19th, 20th, 21st, 28th, 29th and 
35th, and in reserve or as supports, the 9th, 18th, 22d and 32d. The 
3d and 8th batteries were also engaged, but with no loss of life. All the 
actively engaged suffered losses, varying from the nine killed, thirty-one 
wounded of the 29th to the seventy-four killed, one hundred and sixty-five 
wounded out of the three hundred and thirty-four of the 12th and the one 
hundred and eight killed of the 15th. 

In the important series of events which took place around Burnside's 
bridge at Antietam, Massachusetts, regiments took a foremost place. The 
35th and 21st were assigned to Ferrero's brigade, upon which fell largely 
the charge of carrying the bridge under great difficulties and charging the 
Confederate rifle pits above. On September 17, when they charged across 
the bridge and ascended the heights, Lieutenant-Colonel (afterwards brevet 
brigadier-general) Carruth of the 35th was shot through the neck and had 
to be carried from the field, as was the case with Captain King (afterwards 
colonel, 4th Mass. iteavy Artillery), who was wounded in seven places. 
Capts. A. W. Bartlett of Newburyport, and Horace Niles of Randolph, 
both of the 35th, were killed or mortally wounded, and when they were 
withdrawn, only three hundred were left uninjured of a regiment which 
had quitted home, less than a month previous, with more than one thou- 
sand men. Nearly three hours were occupied in successive efforts to carry 
the bridge ; the ammunition of those taking part was nearly exhausted, and 
the general in command reports that < ' the proportion of casualties to the 
number engaged was much greater than common." 1 

The 21st shared the fortunes of the 35th on that day, but with a loss 
of only ten killed, including Second Lieut. Henry C. Holbrook of Barre, 
and thirty-five wounded. 

1 Gen. J. D. Cox in Century War Book, II, 653. General McClellan, in a letter to General Halleck 
at 1.20 p.m. on the second day of the battle, speaks of it as "the most terrible battle of the war — perhaps 
of history." (Official War Records, XIX (2), 312.) 



THE ANTIETAM CAMPAIGN. 73 

In other parts of that fragmentary battle Massachusetts men had a 
prominent share. The 2d Mass. Infantry having taken a Confederate flag, 
Lieut.-Col. Wilder Dwight rode along the line displaying it, amid a storm 
of bullets. 1 Near the end of the battle he fell, mortally wounded. His 
last act before being wounded was to walk along the line of the regiment, 
which was drawn up under the shelter of a fence, and to direct the men to 
keep their heads down out of the reach of the enemy's fire. 2 

How well this regiment reflected the character of such an officer may be 
seen in the contemporary testimonials. Brig. -Gen. A. S. Williams, com- 
manding the 1st Division of the 12th Corps, wrote to Governor Andrew, 
Dec. 5, 1862, of the 2d Mass. Infantry, that "in the battles of Cedar 
Mountain and Antietam its casualties were nearly one-third the number 
engaged in action," and added : " In thoroughness of discipline, in perfec- 
tion of drill, in regularity and promptness in camp and garrison duties, 
and the intelligence and fidelity of its officers, it may well be questioned if 
this regiment has its superior in the service." 3 

Another brave officer who fell at Antietam was Maj. William D. Sedg- 
wick of Lenox, formerly captain in the 2d Mass. Infantry, but at the time 
of his death serving on the staff of General Sedgwick, his kinsman. 
He fell while trying to rally a broken regiment, and while lying fatally 
wounded on the field, wrote to his family, "My country is welcome to 
every drop of nry blood. I love my wife and children as well as any man, 
but I would engage never to see them again if I could thereby secure the 
abolition of slavery." 4 

The 15th Mass. Infantry sustained the heaviest loss among all the regi- 
ments at Antietam, eighty of the killed falling within twenty minutes of 
time. Among these were Capts. Richard Derby 5 of Salem and Clark S. 
Simonds of Fitchburg, with Lieuts. Thomas J. Spurr of Worcester and 
Frank S. Corbin of Dudley. Lieutenant Spurr refused, when mortally 
wounded, to be carried to the rear. 6 

Among other regiments there fell, of conspicuous officers, Capt. George 
W. Batchelder of Salem (19th Mass. Infantry), Capt. John Saunders (1st 

i Life and Letters of Wilder Dwight (Boston, 1891, 2d ed ), p 293. 

a Life, etc , p. 293. Compare his memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 271. 

s Mass. adjutant-general's report, 1862, p. 104. 

* See his memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 179. 

s See his memoir by Mrs P. A. Hanaford (Boston, 1866), entitled The Young Captain. 

• See his memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 472. 



74 NARRATIVE. 



Mass. Sharpshooters), Lieut. Nicholas J. Barrett of Worcester (28th) and 
Color Sergeant Brown (19th), who, when mortally wounded, refused to give 
up the colors he bore. Colonel (afterwards general) Hincks was for the 
second time severely wounded, the first time having been at Glendale. 

The 12th Eegiment — the Webster regiment — went into battle at An- 
tietam with three hundred and thirty-live officers and men, and withdrew 
at last with but thirty-five, under command of a captain, the number of 
killed being seventy-four and of wounded one hundred and sixty-five. As 
they were moving from the field three successive color-bearers were shot 
down, when Lieut. Arthur Dehon finally took them himself rather than 
order any one else into danger. Surgeon Albert A. Kendall of the 12th 
was killed by a bullet while at the operating table, and Surgeon Edward H. 
R. Revere (20th Mass.) also fell. 1 Lieuts. L. F. Cushing and William G. 
White (12th Mass.) were killed in this battle, and Sergt. Charles Edward 
Johnson of the same regiment fell as he was cheering on his men for their 
last attack. Maj. E. M. Burbank and Lieut. George W. Orne of the 12th 
were mortally wounded. 

The battle of Antietam is guardedly characterized by Ropes as being ' ' a 
moderate success." The losses equalled those at Shiloh, and they fell 
largely on regiments almost wholly new. General McClellan admitted a loss 
of nearly twelve thousand five hundred, of whom more than two thousand 
were killed. 2 Of the Confederate dead, two thousand seven hundred were 
counted and buried on the field ; and two thousand of their wounded were 
left there. Without the loss of a gun or a color, McClellan reported the 
capture of thirteen guns, thirty-nine battle flags and six thousand prisoners. 
To many Massachusetts regiments this was their first serious experience of 
war. 

XVII. THE FREDERICKSBURG CAMPAIGN. 

On Nov. 5, 1862, General McClellan was relieved from the command 
of the Army of the Potomac, Maj. -Gen. A. E. Burnside being appointed 
in his place. The Massachusetts troops under General Burnside during 
the ensuing Fredericksburg campaign were as follows : 3 — 

1 See his memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 124. 

a Century War Book, II, 681. " Our losses very heavy, especially in general officers." (McClellan 
to Halleck, Sept. 18, 1862. Official War Records, XIX (2), 322.) 
s Official War Records, XXI, 48. 



THE FREDERICKSBURG CAMPAIGN. 75 

Army of the Potomac. 

Artillery Reserve. 
32d Mass. Infantry, Co. C, Capt. J. C. Fuller. 

Right Grand Division (Maj.-Gen. E. V. Sumner, Massachusetts). 

Second Army Corps, First Division. — Maj.-Gen. D. N. Couch 
(Mass.) ; 2d Brigade, 28th Mass. Infantry, Col. Richard Byrnes. 

Second Division. — 1st Brigade, 15th Mass. Infantry, Maj. Chase 
Philbrick ; 1st Co. Mass. Sharpshooters, Capt. Wm. Plumer. 3d Brigade, 
19th Mass. Infantry, Capt. H. G. O. Weymouth; 20th Mass. Infantry, 
Capt. G. N. Macy. 

Ninth Army Corps, First Division. — 2d Brigade, 29th Mass. In- 
fantry, Lieut.-Col. J. H. Barnes. 3d Brigade, 36th Mass. Infantry, Col. 
Henry Bowman. 

Second Division. — 2d Brigade, 21st Mass. Infantry, Col. Wm. S. 
Clark; 35th Mass. Infantry, Maj. Sidney Willard. 

Centre Grand Division (Maj.-Gen. J. Hooker, Massachusetts). 

Thhid Army Corps, Second Division. — 1st Brigade, 1st Mass. In- 
fantry, Lieut.-Col. Clark B. Baldwin; 11th Mass. Infantry, Col. Wm. 
Blaisdell; 16th Mass. Infantry, Col. T. R. Tannatt. 

Fifth Army Corps, First DrvisiON. — Col. James Barnes (Mass.); 
1st Brigade, 2d Mass. Sharpshooters, Capt. L. E. Wentworth ; 18th Mass. 
Infantry, Lieut.-Col. Joseph Hayes ; 22d Mass. Infantry, Lieut.-Col. W. S. 
Tilton. 2d Brigade, 9th Mass. Infantry, Col. P. R. Guiney ; 32d Mass. 
Infantry, Col. F. J. Parker. Artillery, 3d Mass. Light Battery (C), 
Capt. A. P. Martin; 5th Mass. Light Battery (E), Capt. C. A. Phillips. 
Cavalry, 1st Mass. Cavalry, Col. H. B. Sargent. . 

Left Grand Division. 

M'Dowell's Corps, Second Division. — 2d Brigade, 12th Mass. In- 
fantry, Col. J. L. Bates. 3d Brigade, 13th Mass. Infantry, Col. S. H. 
Leonard. 

Sixth Army Corps. — Artillery, 1st Mass. Light Battery (A), Capt. 
W. H. McCartney. 



76 NARRATIVE. 



Third Division. — 2d Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Charles Devens, Jr., of 
Massachusetts; 7th Mass. Infantry, Lieut. -Col. F. P. Harlow; 10th Mass. 
Infantry, Col. H. L. Eustis ; 37th Mass. Infantry, Col. Oliver Edwards. 

The first conspicuous service rendered by Massachusetts troops in the 
attack on Fredericksburg was in crossing the river in boats in face of a 
severe fire on Dec. 11, 1862. Bridges were being laid across the river, a 
work so impeded by Confederate sharpshooters that in the afternoon volun- 
teers were called for by Col. N. J. Hall to cross in boats and dislodge the 
enemy. Three regiments of Colonel Hall's brigade volunteered, the 7th 
Michigan and the 19th and 20th Mass. In the words of Maj.-Gen. O. O. 
Howard, commanding the division, " The 7th Michigan passed over not far 
from 3 p.m. The 19th Mass. followed immediately at about 3.30 p.m., it 
having been necessary for the boats to cross twice with the 7th Michigan. 
The boats crossed three times to carry over the 19th. The bridge was 
commenced after the 19th had crossed, and completed at sunset about 4.30. 
The 20th followed the 19th in boats before the bridge was completed. No 
other regiments crossed in boats. A company of sharpshooters, Captain 
Plumer's [1st Mass. Sharpshooters], covered the crossing from this bank." 1 
After crossing, the 19th Mass., under Captain Weymouth, advanced up the 
hill to the town, deployed skirmishers and then fell back, maintaining its 
line. Colonel Hall, brigade commander, says in his report: "The 20th 
Mass. was formed in column on the street. The guide, a citizen, was 
killed at the head of the column. ... I ordered Acting Major Macy, 
commanding the 20th Mass., to clear the street leading from the bridge at 
all hazards. ... I cannot presume to express all that is due the officers 
and men of this regiment for the unflinching bravery and splendid discipline 
shown in the execution of the order. Platoon after platoon was swept 
away, but the head of the column did not falter. Ninety-seven officers and 
men were killed and wounded in the space of about fifty yards." 2 Among 
these was Chaplain Arthur B. Fuller of the 16th Mass. Infantry, whose 
resignation as chaplain had been accepted, and who had joined the force as 
a volunteer, crossing in the first boat, taking the rifle of a dead soldier and 
saying to Captain Dunn, who commanded the detachment, "Captain, I 

1 Official War Records, XXI, 265. 

2 Report of Col. N. J. Hall, 7th Michigan Infantry, commanding brigade. (Official War Records, 
XXI, 282.) Compare Walker's 2d Army Corps, p. 150. 



THE FREDERICKSBURG CAMPAIGN. 77 

must do something for my country." 1 This incident was, perhaps, unique 
in the war in view of all the circumstances. Mr. Fuller had just been 
cautioned that he would be exposed to especial danger, as still wearing the 
uniform of a staff officer, and that, as he had his discharge with him, he 
would not be subject to exchange if captured ; nor would his family receive 
a pension were he killed. 2 It is a curious illustration of the uncertainties 
of earthly fame that since Mr. Fuller was killed, technically, as a civilian, his 
name does not appear in the large volume of official records devoted to 
Fredericksburg. 

On the following day the Union forces crossed the river, the leading 
brigade being that commanded by Gen. Charles Devens, Jr., of Worces- 
ter, Mass. Brig. -Gen. John Newton, commanding the 3d Division, says 
in his report : " My thanks are due to all, according to their opportunities, 
but especially to Brig.-Gen. Charles Devens, who commanded the advance 
and rear guard in the crossing and recrossing of the river." 3 In the main 
battle of. Fredericksburg, December 13, the 18th Mass. Infantry (Col. 
Joseph Hayes) was conspicuous in a charge, nearly penetrating the 
enemy's position at Marye's Heights, where its dead and wounded were 
found lying close to the works. At the third assault upon the enemy's 
works in the afternoon, when the 19th Mass. was put in front to occupy 
some freshly made works, which it held until its ammunition was ex- 
hausted, seven color-bearers were shot down in succession ; and on one 
occasion, when two were killed at once, and their colors lay on the ground, 
Lieut. Edgar M. Newcomb of Boston seized both flags and raised them, 
meeting his own death in so doing. Somewhat similar to this was the 
experience of Sergeant Plunkett of the 21st, who raised the national flag 
when it was shot down only to lose both arms and be seriously wounded 
in the chest. He will be remembered by many, in later life, as having 
been for many years the armless sergeant-at-arms of the Massachusetts 
House of Representatives. The details are thus given by his regimental 
commander, Col. W. S. Clark: 4 "The 2d Brigade was now ordered to 
the front, and, forming in double line of battle, most gallantly and steadily 
moved across the plain, swept by the destructive fire of the enemy. When 
about sixty rods from the city, Color-Sergeant Collins of Company A [21st 

i See his memoirs by his brother under the title Chaplain Fuller (Boston, 1863) ; also one in Harvard 
Memorial Biographies (1st ed.), I, 79. « Chaplain Fuller, p. 301. 

3 Official War Records, XXI, 535. * Report in Official War Records, XXI, 327. 



78 NARRATIVE. 



Mass.] was shot and fell to the ground, Sergeant Plunkett of Company E 
instantly seized the colors and carried them proudly forward to the farthest 
point reached by our troops during the battle. When the regiment had 
commenced the delivery of its fire about forty rods from the position of 
the rebel infantry, a shell was thrown, with fatal accuracy, at the colors, 
which again brought them to the ground wet with the life-blood of the 
brave Plunkett, both of whose arms were carried away. Color-Corporal 
Olney of Company H immediately raised the glorious flag and defiantly 
bore it through the remainder of the day. Color-Corporal Ban* of Com- 
pany C, who carried the State colors, was also shot, and his post of honor 
and danger quickly taken by Color-Corporal Wheeler of Company I. 
Color-Corporal Miller was also wounded." 

Of the 28th Mass. Infantry (Col. Richard Byrnes), which had, after the 
20th, the largest list of killed and mortally wounded at Fredericksburg 
(thirty-six) , General Meagher, its brigade commander, says in his report : 
"It is a substantial and splendid addition to the Irish Brigade. ... It 
has sinew, heart and soul. It is commanded by an officer than whom it 
would be difficult to find one of superior aptitude for his command. . . . 
I have not a word, other than that of unqualified commendation, to bestow 
on this well-regulated and admirably disciplined regiment." 1 

The 20th Mass. Infantry lost nearly fifty killed or mortally wounded 
in the whole battle, including Lieut. -Col. Ferdinand Dreher* Capt. Charles 
F. Cabot and Lieut. L. F. Alley ; and Major-General Hancock personally 
expressed to Captain Macy, on the following day, his gratitude for the 
service rendered by the regiment. Col. W. R. Lee resigned the com- 
mand of this regiment from ill-health after the contest at Fredericks- 
burg, and Col. F. W. Palfrey and Colonel Macy were successively put in 
his place. 

The 18th and 23d Mass. infantries were highly complimented at Fred- 
ericksburg by Major-General Martindale; 2 and General Hartsuff said that 
he had commanded more than fifty regiments and had never found a 
better than the 13th Mass. Infantry (Col. S. H. Leonard). This last was 

1 Official War Records, XXI, 245 Colonel Byrnes's report follows, p. 246. 

2 In General Butterfield's report he says, " Captain [L. N.] Tucker, 18th Mass. Volunteers, Acting 
A. D. C, was severely wounded in the arm while in the discharge of his duties, and deserves special men- 
tion for his services." (Official War Records, XXI, 402.) The 18th once pushed on, through eagerness, 
in advance of the line. (P. 409.) 



THE FREDERICKSBURG CAMPAIGN. 79 

peculiarly a militia regiment in its material, and Governor Andrew had 
said of it : " The 13th could furnish officers for a whole regiment, outside 
of itself, and be no more weakened than is a bird by laying its eggs." 

In the words of Gen. Edward Ferrero, commanding brigade : "The 21st 
Mass. Volunteers (Colonel Clark) . . . acted with the steadiness and cour- 
age that they have always shown on the battlefield, and that have won them 
their high reputation. 1 The 35th Mass. Volunteers also behaved splendidly, 
and though losing their commanding officer, Maj. Sidney Willard, 2 early in 
the fight, still fought with unflinching firmness. . . . Dr. Calvin Cutter, 
brigade surgeon (formerly of 21st Mass.), although injured on the 13th 
by a blow from a horse, was unremitting in his attentions to the wounded 
and was of invaluable service." 3 

Lieut. William Hill of the 35th Mass. fell also, and young Lieut. Arthur 
Dehon of the 12th, detailed as aide to General Meade, who says of him 
that his loss " is greatly to be deplored as that of a young officer of high 
promise, endeared to all who knew him for his manly virtues and amiable 
character." 4 

The 12th Mass. Infantry was under fire six hours at Fredericksburg, 
sustaining almost all its losses in the last two hours. 5 Among the other 
officers of various regiments who fell in this battle were Capts. C. A. Dear- 
born of the 32d Mass., George C. Kuby and Joseph W. Collingwood of the 
18th, Thomas Claffee of the 19th, with Edwin J. Weller and John Sullivan 
and William Holland of the 28th. The 15th lost an admirable surgeon in 
Dr. S. Foster Haven of Worcester, and his equally useful classmate, Dr. 
Robert Ware of the 44th, died not long after him. 6 The 29th lost no com- 
missioned officer in the battle, but its chaplain, Rev. Henry E. Hempstead 
of Watertown, died a few days after from its fatigues. 

With these great losses closed the prolonged battle of Fredericksburg, 
and with it the campaign of 1862. The loss of the Union troops had been 
three times that of their opponents, and the whole aflair is now regarded by 

1 They fired away their ammunition and were then relieved by the 48th Pennsylvania. (Official War 
Records, XXI, 322.) For Colonel Clark's report, see p. 327. 

2 An officer of remarkable physique and personality, who fell while waving his sword and leading a 
charge. 

s Official War Records, XXI, 326. 

4 Official War Records, XXI, 513. See his memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, II, 233. 

6 See report of Col. J. L. Bates, Official War Records, XXI, 498. 

6 See Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 192, 238. 

7 " Lee never gained a cheaper victory." (Cook's 12th Mass., p. 85.) 



80 NARRATIVE. 



the best military critics as having been, except Cold Harbor, the most waste- 
ful slaughter of the war. 1 Yet it was brought about by the deliberate action 
of one of the most amiable and humane of the regular army generals, in 
opposition to the wishes both of the War Department at Washington and 
of almost all his own general officers. 2 

XVIII. MASSACHUSETTS AND THE COLORED TROOPS. 

It is a curious fact that one part of the Civil War in which Massa- 
chusetts may claim an unquestioned precedence is the one part for which 
all her previous traditions had especially fitted her, — the arming of the 
blacks. It was a movement which went on almost simultaneously in differ- 
ent directions and on widely various lines, but by a curious fatality every 
one of those lines passed through the hands of a Massachusetts man. 

Negroes had long been employed in the navy, 3 but it is probable that 
the first direct proposal looking toward the enlistment of colored men was 
in a letter from Governor Andrew to the Secretary of War, April 25, 1861, 
in which he says, " Will you authorize the enlistment here and mustering 
into the United States service Irish, Germans and other tough men, to be 
drilled and prepared here for service?"* It is difficult to tell what these 
lines mean, which were underscored in the original letter, if they do not 
refer to the negroes. 

It was, moreover, the State of Massachusetts which, in advance of all 
others, debated in its Legislature resolutions urging upon the general 
government the employment of colored soldiers ; these resolutions receiv- 
ing a clear majority in both houses, but being defeated by a technicality. 
The Senate passed them by a vote of 17 to 13, and the House voted to 
suspend the rules for the same purpose, 74 to 69 ; this being a defeat, 
as a two-thirds vote was required. It was the last day of the session, 
May 23, 1861, and this vote makes it probable that the resolutions would 



J It was also followed by much illness and much suffering among the wounded. Dr. Thomas F. 
Perley, medical inspector-general, reports (Jan. 8, 1863), " I do not believe I have ever seen greater misery 
from sickness than exists now in our Army of the Potomac." 

2 Compare Dodge's Bird's Eye View, p. 114. Official War Records, XXI, 67, 96, 940. It is to be re- 
membered that McClellan had been removed for alleged inaction, and that Burnside was being at once 
held back and pushed on. See a letter urging increased action- from Quartermaster-General Meigs. 
(Official War Records, XXI, 916 ) General Walker well describes Burnside as " the sweetest, kindest, 
most true-hearted of men, loving and lovable, dashing, romantic, picturesque, but he was not fit for the 
command of an army ; he knew he was not." (2d Army Corps, p. 137.) 

a Ammen's The Old Navy and the New, p. 368. 4 Schouler, I, 122. 



MASSACHUSETTS AND THE COLORED TROOPS. 81 

have passed the House had it remained in session one day longer. Up to 
this time, it must be remembered, colored men were not admitted to the 
Massachusetts militia, repeated applications from the leading colored men 
of Boston having failed to remove the restriction. 

In the final debate, the main supporters of the resolution were Messrs. 
Henry L. Pierce of Dorchester, Charles W. Slack of Boston and William F. 
Durfee of New Bedford, the chief opponents being Messrs. A. H. Bullock 
of Worcester and George T. Davis of Greenfield. The opposition was 
based apparently on no distrust of the blacks, but upon the necessity of 
conciliating the prejudices of the Border States. Mr. (afterwards 
governor) Bullock ' ' avowed his willingness to remove every vestige of 
disability from the colored citizens, and in proper time he hoped to see it 
done. This was not the time. Twenty-three sovereign States are a unit 
in this conflict. He who would now cast a firebrand among the ranks of 
the united North and West and the Border States will initiate a calamity 
the extent of which will be appalling and inconceivable." 1 

The unquestioned priority in the actual enterprise belonged to Maj.- 
Gen. David Hunter of Washington, D. C, who began recruiting May 9, 
1862, a black regiment called the First South Carolina Volunteers. But 
General Hunter, with many fine qualities, was a thoroughly impetuous 
man, whimsical, variable and easily influenced by his staff officers, few of 
whom had any real faith in the undertaking ; he acted without authority 
from Washington, and his whole enterprise had been disallowed by the 
United States government when Brig. -Gen. Rufus Saxton, then military 
governor of the department, availing himself of the fact that one company 
of the regiment had not, like the rest, been disbanded, made that the basis 
of a reorganization of the regiment under the same name ; and, under 
authority from the War Department dated Aug. 25, 1862, 2 made it the 
pioneer of the whole subsequent series of slave-regiments. Now, General 
Saxton was a Massachusetts man ; so was the colonel whom he put in 
charge of the regiment (T. W. Higginson) ; so was the first officer, 
detailed Aug. 4, 1862, to recruit for the 1st Kansas colored regiment 
(Capt. B>. J. Hinton) ; so was Maj.-Gen. B. F. Butler, who recruited 
(Aug. 25, 1862) three regiments of free colored men in New Orleans. 
These five were the only colored regiments of the year 1862. The first 

1 Schouler, I, 183. s For this letter of instructions see my "Army Life in a Black Regiment," p. 278. 



82 NARRATIVE. 



colored regiment recruited by any Eastern State was the 54th Mass. 
(Feb. 9, 1863), commanded by Col. R. G. Shaw, whose subsequent death 
and burial among his soldiers at Fort Wagner was the most picturesque 
and striking event in the whole career of this class of troops. This, like 
the 55th, consisted mainly of free negroes. Later, the large enlistment of 
colored troops in the slave States was mainly under the charge of Maj.-Gen. 
G. L. Andrews and Maj. G. L. Stearns, both Massachusetts men. Such 
also was Maj.-Gen. N. P. Banks,, whose organization of the colored troops 
at New Orleans into the Corps D'Afrique, though in some respects injudi- 
ciously planned, 1 was a further step. Brig. -Gen. Samuel M. Quincy, who 
arranged a special system of tactics for their benefit, was also from Massa- 
chusetts ; and so was, at least by residence, Maj.-Gen. Edward W. Hincks, 
who commanded colored troops more efficiently, on a large scale, than any 
one else during the war. All these things gave to the State of Massa- 
chusetts a just right to claim that, if she had done more than any other 
State to give an anti-slavery character to the war, she had at least met 
that part of the responsibility without shrinking. It must also be remem- 
bered that the early organizers and officers of the colored troops fought, in 
a manner, with ropes round their necks, both they and their black recruits 
having been expressly denied by the Confederate government the privileges 
of soldiers. 2 They had also to encounter for a long time the disapproval 
of many officers of high rank, both regular and volunteer ; this often lead- 
ing to a marked inferiority of weapons, to a grudging bestowal of supplies 
(even of medical supplies) and to a very disproportionate share of fatigue 
duty, often interfering greatly with proper military training. Every one 
of the above-named Massachusetts officers had these same obstacles to sur- 
mount. 



1 His organization of regiments of only half the usual size, with a full complement of 4 officers for each, 
was peculiarly unfortunate ; for it created the impression that the new levies offered peculiar difficulties in 
respect to drill and discipline, an impression which proved quite opposite to the fact. This mistake added 
to the social prejudice, already strong enough, against the colored troops; and the prejudice yielded very 
slowly to the influence exerted by their good behavior, both in camp and under fire. 

2 After Fort Pillow " the negroes were not acknowledged as prisoners, and went through with the com- 
pany as waiters and hostlers. (John V. Barkley of Co. C, 2d Tenn. Cavalry, Round Table, Nashville, 
Tenn., March 8, 1890.) Compare Walcott's 21st Mass. Infantry, p. 427. The resolution passed by the 
Confederate Congress in regard to officers was as follows : " Sect. 4. That every white person, being a 
commissioned officer, or acting as such, who, during the present war, shall command negroes or mulattoes 
in arms against the Confederate States, or who shall arm, train, organize, or prepare negroes or mulattoes 
for military service against the Confederate States, or who shall voluntarily aid negroes or mulattoes in 
any military enterprise, attack, or conflict in such service, shall be deemed as inciting servile insurrection, 
and shall, if captured, be put to death, or be otherwise punished at the discretion of the court." 



MASSACHUSETTS AND THE COLORED TROOPS. 83 

The career of the Massachusetts officers in organizing colored troops 
elsewhere need not here be followed in detail, but that of the 54th and 55th 
was too exceptional not to be more particularly mentioned. It has already 
been shown that, contrary to a prevalent impression, they were not the 
first colored regiments organized. Five such regiments were already in 
existence in the year 1862, whereas Governor Andrew's permission to 
recruit a colored regiment was not received until Jan. 26, 1863, and 
recruiting did not begin until February 9. The first squad of recruits 
went into camp at Eeadville on February 21, and the regiment was more 
than filled on May 15, the surplus going into the 55th, which was also 
finally mustered on June 22. The men meanwhile had been recruited in 
various States by Massachusetts agents ; and this, with the careful and 
elaborate preparation made, gave a peculiar prominence to the new organi- 
zations. The officers selected were largely those who had seen service in 
other regiments, and the first colonel was young Robert G. Shaw, who, 
though a resident of New York, was of Boston birth, and had been a 
Harvard student, though not a graduate. He had already served with 
honor in the 2d Mass., had proved himself a good organizer and com- 
mander, and had, among other special qualifications, that of a peculiarly 
striking appearance ; looking very youthful, with a blond coloring, which 
made him, as he rode at the head of his dusky regiment, beyond all com- 
parison the most picturesque figure who had passed through the streets of 
Boston or marched down Broadway. So easily in time of warlike excite- 
ment are men influenced by such externals, that no contemporary descrip- 
tion of the march of the 54th fails to dwell with enthusiasm on this seem- 
ingly trivial circumstance. 

The 54th left camp on May 28, 1863, under orders to report to Major- 
General Hunter at Beaufort, S. C. Arriving there, it was brigaded under 
Col. James Montgomery of the 2d South Carolina Volunteers (afterwards 
34th U. S. Colored Troops). He was a man of mature years, a veteran 
guerrilla leader from Kansas, personally daring and active, but utterly 
without the system and order needed by a brigade commander, and with a 
taste for guerrilla methods very unattractive to the better-trained officers 
of the 54th Mass. 1 Their ultimate removal to the command of Brig. -Gen.- 

J See Lieut. C. J. Russel's opinions in Harvard Memorial Biographies, II, 487. For Colonel Shaw's, 
see his Correspondence (privately printed) . 



84 NARRATIVE. 



George C. Strong was a source of satisfaction, although it was accom- 
panied almost immediately by one of the severest ordeals of the war. 
After a peculiarly fatiguing embarkation and night voyage, the regiment 
reached Folly Island at 9 a.m. on the 18th of June, had a toilsome march 
alone: the beaches until 2 p.m., and crossing the inlet of Morris Island 
reported to General Strong at 5 p.m. They had no rations, had had no 
food that day and little sleep for two nights, and in this condition were 
placed at the head of a night attack on Fort Wagner. 1 

XIX. OPERATIONS IN" THE DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

Some minor engagements occurred in South Carolina in the summer of 
1862 in which a few Massachusetts regiments took part; two companies of 
the First Cavalry at Pocataligo (May 29) under Maj. H. L. Higginson 
without loss, and the 28th Mass. Infantry at Legare's Point (June 2) under 
Lieut. -Col. M. Moore with only a few wounded men. At Secessionville 
(June 16) an attack of some force was made on fortified works at James 
Island, and in this the 28th sustained considerable losses (twenty killed 
or mortally wounded), the affair being an extremely rash assault upon a 
strongly fortified redoubt, and being described by one authority in the 
Department of the South, Judge-Advocate Cowley, 2 as "an inexcusable 
blunder from beginning to end. They had to advance upon a narrow ridge 
of land not over two hundred yards wide, swept by grape and canister 
from six cannon . . . and exposed to a murderous fire from riflepits and 
sharpshooters." 

The 54th Mass. was under fire for the first time at James Island, July 
16, 1863, aiding to repel an attack made by Confederate troops upon the 
10th Connecticut, and behaved so well as to be complimented in orders by 
General Terry, who praised "the steadiness and soldierly conduct of the 
54th Mass., who were on duty at the outposts on the right and met the 
brunt of the attack." 3 The following night James Island was hastily evac- 

1 For a Confederate account of the attack on Fort Wagner, see Maj. John Johnson's Defence of 
Charleston Harbor, p. 93. His appendix gives the official reports of Union officers. For "Union accounts 
see Emilio's admirable History of the 54th Mass. There are other descriptions in Gordon's War Diary, 
pp. 188, 198, 215, and elsewhere. 

3 Leaves from a Lawyer's Life Afloat and Ashore, p. 60. The author gives a spirited account of the 
engagement and justly complains of its being slighted by historians. (See Putnam's Rebellion Record, 
V, 209-211 ; XII, 494-504.) " Resulted in disastrous defeat." (Crowninshield's 1st Mass. Cavalry, p. 62.) 

a Emilio's 54th Mass., p. 63, fully describes this affair. General Seymour also speaks of the 54th as 
" having conducted itself commendably a few days previously on James Island." (Official War Records, 
Serial No. 46, p. 347.) 



OPERATIONS IN" THE DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 85 

uated, under orders, and they marched all night in a severe and prolonged 
thunder-storm, through swamps and over frail narrow bridges, among diffi- 
culties that can only be comprehended by those familiar with the peculiar 
topography of the Sea Islands, where every bayou, at low tide, becomes con- 
verted into a mere rivulet of water amid vast stretches of mud. They reached 
Cole's Island at 5 a.m. ; they had scarcely any rations left and very little 
fresh water. In the evening they embarked on another steamer by means 
of a leaky long-boat holding but thirty, — so that they were all night in the 
embarkation. They reached Folly Island at 7 a.m., still without rations. 
Marching six miles, they waited for transportation across Light House Inlet, 
landing at Folly Island about 5 p.m., July 18, 1863. In this condition, the 
regiment being thus exhausted and still without food, their commander was 
asked by General Strong if he would lead the column of attack on what 
was called "the strongest single earthwork known in the history of war- 
fare." 1 General Strong's words were, "You may lead the column if you 
say yes. Your men, I know, are worn out, but do as you choose." The 
offer was accepted. It is to be noticed that a previous assault on Fort Wag- 
ner had failed, — the leading regiment, the 76th Pennsylvania, having halted 
before the tremendous fire and lain down upon the ground. 2 

The attacking; force for this second assault consisted of three brigades 
of infantry, the first under General Strong, composed of the 54th Mass. 
with five other regiments. 3 The selection of the 54th was made by General 
Seymour and General Strong in consultation. It is worth recording that 
the latter had been a Democrat in politics and the former had been reported 
in the department as opposed to the enlistment of colored troops ; but 
there is no reason to doubt that the selection was made in perfect good 
faith. The 54th was to lead the assault. 

The head of the column being formed, while the troops were waiting 
Colonel Shaw walked back to Lieutenant-Colonel Hallowell and said, "I 
shall go in advance with the national flag. You will keep the State flag 
with 3 r ou ; it will give the men something to rally round. We shall take 
the fort or die there ! Good-by ! " General Strong, riding up, said to the 

, i It mounted eighteen guns and was garrisoned by seven hundred men. (Emilio, p. 170.) The Con- 
federate authorities claimed for it, on the other hand, that no fort was ever so strongly attacked. (South- 
ern Historical Society Papers.) For the best descriptions of the fort, apart from Emilio's, see Ohio Loyal 
Legion Sketches, II, 323, and Gordon's War Diary, p. 215. 

2 See General Strong's report, Official War Records, 46, p. 256. 

3 The 6th Connecticut, 48th New York, 3d New Hampshire, 9th Maine and 76th Pennsylvania. 



86 NARRATIVE. 



men, " Boys, I am a Massachusetts man and I know you will fight for the 
honor of the State." Calling out the color-bearer he said, "If this man 
should fall, who will lift the flag and carry it on ? " Colonel Shaw standing 
near, took a cigar from between his lips and said quietly, "I will," amid 
loud applause from the men. 1 The storming party advanced, fully visible, 
along three-quarters of a mile of sand, under a sharp fire for two hun- 
dred yards. Decimated on the way by this, they reached the ditch, de- 
scended into it, crossed through three or four feet of water and mounted 
the slope. Colonel Shaw, with both standard bearers, reached the parapet, 
when, just as he was shouting "Forward, Fifty-fourth," he fell dead, shot 
through the heart. Capts. C . J. Russell and W. H. Simpkins were killed 
at almost the same time. For some reason, never fully explained, there 
was an interval before the other regiments of the brigade came up. Of 
course the 54th was driven back, 2 and the loss of eighty killed showed what 
the struggle had been; the national colors were brought away, and Sergt. 
W. H. Carney, who bore them, was twice severely wounded. Sergt. R. J. 
Simmons, Corp. Henry F. Peal and Private George Wilson were also espe- 
cially complimented in the report 3 of Lieutenant-Colonel Hallowell, who was 
left in command, though himself very severely wounded ; the latter soldier 
(Wilson) , when shot through the shoulder, had refused to fall back without 
his captain's permission. Three officers were killed and eleven wounded, 
most of them severely. When driven from the fort the regiment was drawn 
up in line, seven hundred yards from it, under command of Capt. L. F. 
Emilio, ninth captain in the line, all his superior officers having been either 
killed or wounded. Subsequent attacks were made by the rest of Strong's 
brigade, especially by the 6th Connecticut and 48th New York, but with 
similar repulse, General Strong himself receiving a wound from which he 
ultimately died. Colonel Putnam's brigade, with the 7th New Hampshire 

1 Emilio's 54th Mass, p. 77. 

5 "Victims of a plan in which regular approaches were overlooked, weak points neglected, a proper 
hour disregarded ; to whom reinforcements were not sent, nor a path levelled for them with artillery ; nor 
finally was the commanding general (as all agree) where he could either know or direct their advance, 
their management or their defeat." (Gordon's War Diary, p. 188.) Compare Cowley's Leaves from 
a Lawyer's Life, pp. 88, 93. Maj. J. W. M. Appleton's paper in Putnam's Magazine, N. S. IV, 9. 
Gordon's War Diary, pp. 188, 198. General Seymour's report is in Official War Records, 46, p. 345. 

8 This brief and manly report is in Official War Records, 46, p. 362. The report of the Confederate 
general, R. S. Ripley, in which he speaks of the 54th as " sent to butchery by hypocrisy and inhumanity," 
is on p. 370. In a curious Confederate list of "Abolition prisoners captured near Charleston, S. C, July 
11-19, 1863," one prisoner is credited to the " 150th Massachusetts " (p. 392). Some interesting answers 
to questions as to the military qualities of colored troops may be found on p. 328. 



OPERATIONS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 87 



and the 62d and 67th Ohio, afterwards tried the attack, Colonel Putnam 
himself being shot through the head. It was a series of perfectly hopeless 
and desperate night attacks, serving only to test the courage of the men. 
In this respect it had an effect, beyond any action of the war, in vindicating 
the character of the colored troops. On this subject there can hardly be 
said to have been a dissenting voice. When the writer asked General 
Strong afterwards, on board the steamer which was to carry him North, 
how the 54th behaved, he said emphatically, " No new regiment, which had 
lost its colonel, could have behaved better." 1 But the final test is that of 
Confederate officers themselves. Lieut. Iredell Jones, visiting the battery 
afterwards, wrote, " One file of negroes numbered thirty. Numbers of both 
white and black were killed on top of our breastworks as well as inside. 
The negroes fought gallantly and were headed by as brave a colonel as ever 
lived. He mounted the breastworks waving his sword and at the head of 
his regiment, and he and a negro orderly sergeant fell dead over the inner 
crest of the works." 2 

A good deal of just indignation was created after this event, by a report, 
widely disseminated, that an order had been given by General Hagood, in 
command at Fort Wagner, in respect to Colonel Shaw's body, "to bury 
him with his niggers." In conversing with General Hagood ten years after 
the writer was expressly assured by him that no such order was given by 
him and that no such conversation took place, and I was entirely convinced 
that there had been some misunderstanding on the part of Assistant Surgeon 
John T. Luck, U. S. N., by whom the charge was originally made in the 
Army and Navy Journal. 3 A letter to me on the same point from General 
Hagood will be found in Emilio's History of the 54th Mass., 4 where the 
whole affair is discussed. I still retain my original opinion of the 
matter. 

The 24th Mass. Infantry (Colonel Osborne) formed an important part 
of the besieging force which subsequently brought about the surrender of 
Fort Wagner, and was ordered, Aug. 26, 1863, to capture by a sortie some 
riflepits in front of the fourth parallel of the besieging force. Some two 
hundred men took part in the attack and carried the position, capturing the 
occupants (sixty-seven) with a loss of three; the victors then entrenched 

1 For a similar remark made by him to Mr. E. L. Pierce, see Emilio's 54th Mass., p. 94. 

» Emilio's 54th Mass., p. 95. s Army and Navy Journal, III, p. 71. 4 Emilio, p. 100. 



88 NARRATIVE. 



rapidly, and it afterwards became the fifth parallel. They were then sub- 
jected to a heavy fire, killing Lieut. James A. Perkins and several others. 1 
During the night the regiment was relieved by another. There was a long 
siege before the final surrender of the fort, and in this siege the 54th lost 
heavily at different times and the 24th and 40th lightly. The 54th, with 
other colored regiments, performed a rather excessive share of fatigue 
duty, and was complimented for this by Maj. T. B. Brooks, assistant 
engineer. 2 

The 54th Mass. was a^ain under fire with the 40th Mass. at the battle 
of Olustee, Fla., Feb. 20, 1864. This was one of those utterly wasted 
defeats caused by the complication of political and military aims. It was 
the result of an attempt to take possession of the main land of Florida with 
a hope of bringing its people back into the Union, — an attempt in which 
every advantage was given to the Confederates by their possession of in- 
terior lines, so that they could easily overwhelm any given force by bringing 
up reinforcements. The first onset having been unfavorable to the Union 
troops, Montgomery's brigade was ordered forward to hold the enemy in 
check until a new line could be formed in the rear. This was effectually 
done and a newspaper correspondent wrote, "The two colored regiments 
had stood in the gap and saved the army." 3 The other colored regiment 
was the 1st North Carolina, which was first withdrawn, having lost heavily. 
The 54th Mass. was finally left alone, every other organization having been 
withdrawn, including Langdon's U. S. Battery, which had lost three guns. 
They were out of ammunition, and when some arrived it was of the wrong 
calibre. So hopeless seemed their position that Colonel Montgomery said, 
" in his bushwhacking way," " Now, men, you have done well. I love you 
all. Each man take care of himself," but Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, more 
wisely, rallied the line, ordered bayonets fixed and exercised the regiment 
in the manual of arms to quiet it. It then retreated in good order, the 
last to quit the field. As at Fort Wagner, Seymour had allowed his forces 

1 " A brilliant charge." (Report of Maj. T. B. Brooks, assistant engineer, Official War Records, 46, 
p. 295.) "I looked upon the gallant achievement of the 24th Mass. Regiment in rushing forward to 
capture an important position in front of Wagner with admiration. . . . But what good was the capture 
of Fort Wagner to do us ? " (Gordon's War Diary, p. 198.) 

* Official War Records, 46, p. 198. 

3 Emilio, p. 167. He also says (p. 163) : " Adjutant Howard relates that as he was riding over the field 
beside Colonel Hallowell, General Seymour rode up to that officer and told him, in substance, that the 
day was lost and that everything depended on the 54th." 



OPERATIONS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 89 

to be beaten in detail as they came up. 1 During the retreat, the 1st Mass. 
Cavalry (Independent Battalion) assisted in covering the rear, but without 
losses, and the 55th was not in action. The 40th Mass. also lost some men 
in the engagement, in which it served as a mounted infantry, " on animals 
raked and scraped up within the department," according to Gen. G. H. 
Gordon. The loss of the 54th was fourteen killed, sixty-three wounded and 
eight missing. 

In the expedition to James Island, July 2-9, 1864, the 54th sustained 
no injury, but the 55th and the 4th Cavalry (2d Battalion) had casualties. 2 
The 55th on taking possession of the island attacked and drove back a por- 
tion of the Confederate battery, capturing two guns. The troops were in the 
field a whole day with the thermometer at 110 degrees, many men falling 
from sunstroke. The whole movement was ineffectual and rather aimless, 
as were almost all attempts to advance our lines among the islands, and 
the 55th lost eleven men while the 4th Cavalry lost slightly. 3 

The defeat at Honey Hill (November 30) was less humiliating than that 
at Olustee, because there was more object in the battle. It formed a part 
of an attempt to. carry out an order given by General Halleck, by report of 
General Sherman, that General Foster should break the Charleston and Sa- 
vannah Railroad about Pocotaligo about the first of December. 4 This par- 
ticular fight was sufficiently well timed for Lieut. -Col. C. C. Jones, Jr., in 
his Siege of Savannah to say of it, « ' The engagement [November 30] at 
Honey Hill released the city of Savannah from an impending danger, which, 
had it not been thus averted, would have necessitated its immediate evacua- 
tion." General Potter wrote of the troops engaged, "Nothing but the 
formidable character of the obstacles they encountered prevented them 
from achieving success;" and Capt. Charles C. Soule, of the 55th Mass., 
wrote to the Philadelphia Weekly Times, "The generalship displayed was 

i "We were whipped in detail.". . . Five brigadier-generals had remained idly awaiting results on 
those islands [Folly and Morris] while as many brigades, commanded by colonels, were being whipped at 
Olustee." (War Diary by George H. Gordon, one of the brigadier-generals, pp. 282, 283 ) Compare 
Walker's 2d Army Corps, p 405, "The Confederates knew better. They had always brigadier-generals 
to command their brigades and usually major-generals to command their division." 

a Emilio, p. 201. 

8 " To continue the Department of the South as an aggressive one was a folly, nay, almost a crime." 
(War Diary of General G. H. Gordon, p. 289 ) General Gordon had little patience with General Gill- 
more, whose military qualities, apart from engineering, were not highly esteemed by those under him. 
With admirable scouts at his command he rarely took the pains to ascertain in advance the conditions of 
proposed operations, and was quite apt to throw the blame on his subordinates if they failed to perform 
impossibilities. 4 Emilio, p. 237. 



90 NARRATIVE. 



not equal to the soldierly qualities of the troops engaged. There appears to 
have been a lack of foresight in the preparations." This lack was certainly 
a very familiar thing in the Department of the South, where, in a most in- 
tricate and peculiar country, expeditions have been repeatedly sent out with- 
out the slightest previous investigation and wholly without knowledge of the 
localities, — attempting to navigate unnavigable streams and to cross bayous 
of impassable mud, — and this when opposed to an enemy that knew every 
by-path and held interior lines. On November 30 the 55th Mass. (Colonel 
Hartwell) lost thirty-one killed and thirty-eight wounded. The list of 
killed in this battle included Lieut. David Reid of Boston, who had had 
a curious sense of certainty of his own death, yet "met his death in the 
forefront of battle, his body lying in advance of the artillery pieces until 
brought back." 1 

The 55th was again under fire, with slight loss, at Deveaux Neck, S. C, 
Dec. 9, 1864, and without loss at James Island, S. C, Feb. 10, 1865 ; also 
the 54th at Boykin's Mills, S. Q., April 18, and at Swift Creek the follow- 
ing day, losing six men in these engagements, which were the last battles 
of the war in which Massachusetts troops took serious part. They occurred 
in connection with what was called "Potter's Raid," conducted by Gen. E. 
E. Potter under General Sherman's orders, the object being to reach and 
destroy a vast amount of rolling stock on a railway already destroyed by 
him. The raid included the 54th and 55th Mass. infantries and a detach- 
ment of the 4th Mass. Cavalry, and was put to an end by the appearance 
of a flag of truce announcing an armistice between Sherman and Johnston. 

It may be proper to refer again to a fact already mentioned, that the first 
regiment of freed slaves formed during the war was formed of South Caro- 
lina and Florida recruits (volunteers) by Brig. -Gen. Rufus Saxton, military 
governor of the Department of the South, — he being a Massachusetts man, 
— and that its organization was intrusted to another Massachusetts man, 
Col. T. W. Higginson. The surgeon and first assistant surgeon, the chap- 
lain, a captain and several lieutenants were also from Massachusetts. The 
headquarters of this regiment were at Beaufort, S. C. It did a large 
amount of duty as advanced picket, and conducted, with the co-operation of 
the navy, three important expeditions into the interior, ascending at different 
times, for various purposes, the St. Mary's, the St. John's and the South 

1 Emilio's 54th Mass., pp. 251, 252. 



THE CHANCELLORSVILLE CAMPAIGN. 91 

Edisto or P'on Pon rivers. The first two raids were eminently successful, 
bringing away recruits, provisions, etc., in addition to the more especial 
object of each enterprise. The third failed of success from the want of 
water for the boats, which grounded repeatedly, — the Pon Pon River being 
a tidal inlet, almost dry at low water, — so that they were got off with diffi- 
culty, and the loss of the smallest one, including two small guns, which 
were afterwards fished up by the Confederates and afterwards retaken by 
the 1st South Carolina in an engagement, — a curious coincidence. The 
regiment was repeatedly in action with shore batteries and sustained itself 
well, but failed in the chief object of the enterprise, which was to ascend 
as high as the Charleston and Savannah railroad and cut it. 1 

Due credit should also be given the State of Massachusetts for the enor- 
mous service rendered by General Saxton as military governor in organizing 
the vast number of freedmen and refugees upon the Sea Islands, and first 
proving, on a large scale, that the plantations could be successfully carried 
on by free labor. In this respect he, more than any other man, solved the 
problem for the nation, but as it was really the application of military 
methods to civil operations, it cannot properly find an ampler place here. 
For the time, the Sea Islands were an object lesson, constantly visited 
from all parts of the country for the study of a difficult and momentous 
social problem. 

XX. THE CHANCELLORSVILLE CAMPAIGN. 

When General Hooker was ordered, Jan. 25, 1863, to the command of 
the Army of the Potomac, there were the following Massachusetts regiments 
and batteries, twenty-six different organizations, among the more than one 
hundred thousand men whom he commanded. 2 

Artillery Reserve. 
32d Mass. Infantry, Co. C, Capt. J. C. Fuller. 

First Army Corps. 
Second Division. — 2d Brigade, 12th Mass. Infantry, Col. J. L. Bates ; 

1 See General Gillmore's report in Official War Records, 46, p. 8, and Colonel Higginson's report, p. 
194. Compare Higginson's Army Life in a Black Regiment. 

2 Official War Records, Serial No. 39, pp. 156-170. It is worth noting that in addition to the troops 
here named both Hooker and Doubleday wrote at different times to the War Department asking, as a 
favor, to have the 34th Mass. Infantry (Colonel Wells) sent to them. (Official War Records, 39, pp. 54, 
91.) 



92 NARRATIVE. 



3d Brigade (Col. S. H. Leonard commanding), 13th Mass., Lieut.-Col. 

N. W. Batchelder. 

Second Army Corps. 

First Division. — 2d Brigade, 28th Mass., Col. Kichard Byrnes. 

Second Division. — 1st Brigade, 15th Mass., Maj. G. C. Joslin ; 3d 
Brigade, 19th Mass., Lieut.-Col. A. F. Devereux ; 20th Mass., Lieut.-Col. 
G. N. Macy ; 1st Mass. Sharpshooters, Capt. Wm. Plumer. 

Third Army Corps. 
Second Division. — 1st Brigade, 1st Mass., Col. N. B. McLaughlen; 
11th Mass., Col. Wm. Blaisdell ; 16th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Waldo Merriam. 

Fifth Army Corps. 

First Division. — - 1st Brigade (Brig. -Gen. James Barnes), 18th Mass., 
Col. Joseph Hayes; 22d Mass., Col. W. S. Tilton ; 2d Co. Mass. Sharp- 
shooters, Lieut. Robert Smith; 2d Brigade, 9th Mass., Col. P. E. 
Guiney ; 32d Mass., Lieut.-Col. Luther Stephenson ; Artillery (Capt. A. P. 
Martin), 3d Light Battery (C), Capt. A. P. Martin; 5th Light Battery 
(E), Capt. C. A. Phillips. 

Sixth Army Corps. 

First Division. — Artillery, 1st Light Battery (A), Capt. W. H. 
McCartney. 

Third Division. — 2d Brigade, 7th Mass., Col. T. D. Johns; 10th 
Mass., Lieut.-Col. J. B. Parsons; 37th Mass., Col. Oliver Edwards. 

Eleventh Army Corps. 
First Division. — Brigadier-General Devens. 
Second Division. — 2d Brigade, 33d Mass., Col. A. B. Underwood. 

Twelfth Army Corps. 
First Division. — 3d Brigade, 2d Mass., Col. S. M. Quincy. 

Cavalry Corps. 
Second Division. — 1st Brigade (Col. H. B. Sargent), 1st Mass., Col. 
G. S. Curtis. 

The first task devolving on General Hooker was the reorganization of 
his army, which was being decimated by desertion and absence. " So loose 



THE CHANCELLORSVILLE CAMPAIGN. 93 

had been its discipline that some eighty-five thousand officers and men 
appeared- on the rolls . . . as absent without leave." 1 One hundred and 
fifty regiments were thoroughly inspected, and on March 3, 1863, the result 
of this inspection was announced. Eleven regiments were commended and 
were rewarded by special privileges in the way of furloughs, — three from 
Massachusetts (the 1st, 2d and 20th), two each from Maine and New York, 
and one each from New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Minnesota. 
Fourteen batteries were similarly commended, of which two were from 
Massachusetts, the 1st (McCartney's) and the 3d (Martin's). On the other 
hand, twenty-five regiments were reproved and , punished by cessation of all 
furloughs ; of these, fifteen were from New York, eight from Pennsylvania 
and one each from Indiana and Massachusetts. 2 Eleven batteries were also 
reproved, not one of which was from Massachusetts. 

Within four months Hooker had under his command nearly one hundred 
and twenty thousand men, 3 whom he himself designated as " the finest army 
on this planet." His first step was a brilliant one, soon to be followed by 
defeat and disappointment. On April 29 and 30 an army of fifty thousand 
men, each bearing sixty pounds of baggage, marched twenty-seven miles, 
crossed two streams guarded by an enemy, and took up a strong position at 
Chancellorsville, Va. So sure was Hooker of his position that he announced 
in an official order (April 30), " The enemy must either ingloriously fly or 
come out from behind his defences and give us battle on our own ground, 
where certain destruction awaits him." 4 But the superior generalship of 
Lee and the westerly flank movement under Jackson reversed the condition, 
and an utter surprise brought on a complete defeat. On May 5 the Union 
army recrossed the river, having lost in killed, wounded and missing more 
than seventeen thousand men, 5 of whom more than seven hundred were 
from Massachusetts regiments. 

s Dodge's Bird's Eye View, p. 127. Halleck wrote Hooker, March 5, 1863, that 9,692 officers (of the 
whole army) were absent from their commands. (Official War Records, 39, p. 123 ) The result of 
Hooker's inspection was announced in G. 0. 18, Army of the Potomac, March 3, 1863. The Order itself 
may be found in Official War Records, 39, p. 119. Compare Cudworth's 1st Regiment Mass. Infantry, p. 
348. 

2 It is to be observed that the regiment thus censured, while occupying on May 3 a breastwork 
peculiarly exposed, declined the offer of the brigade commander to be relieved and placed in reserve, 
the lieutenant-colonel commanding saying that " the regiment preferred to remain in front." (Official 
War Records, 39, p. 518.) 

3 It is doubtful whether Hooker had over one hundred and thirteen thousand men for actual combat. 
(Doubleday's Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, p. 2.) 

« Official War Records, 39, p. 171. 6 17,287. (Official War Records, 39, p. 192.) 



94 NARRATIVE. 



Of all the great battles of the army, Chancellorsville stands out as the 
one complete and overwhelming surprise. Many suggestions of danger 
had been sent in during the day (May 2, 1863) and there had been ample 
time between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. for an impregnable defence, but Howard 
seemed utterly indifferent to all alarms, although Schurz and Devens both 
took some small precautions by facing a few reserve regiments to the flank, 
but went no farther. Curiously enough, the first immediate notice of Jack- 
son's attack "did not come from our pickets, but from deer, rabbits and 
other wild animals of the forest, driven from their coverts by his advance." 1 
Devens, who was nearest the enemy, was severely wounded in attempting to 
rally his men. His division taken in flank was driven back on Schurz's 
division, and that on Steinwehr's ; and all retreated, driven in by sheer force 
of numbers. Among all their retreating body there was but one Massa- 
chusetts regiment, the 33d, this being one of tried courage, under a com- 
mander worthy of it (Col. A. B. Underwood), and having for a brigade 
commander one of the most daring and resolute officers in the whole army, 
Gen. Francis C. Barlow. It is only, therefore, because of the prominent 
share in the disaster attaching to a Massachusetts general that we need to 
dwell on it at all. 

Great injustice was done at the time to General Devens, in the assump- 
tion that he could have acted independently of his commanding officer in 
averting the surprise. General Noble, then colonel of the 17th Connecticut 
Infantry, asserted that "the disaster resulted from Howard's and Devens' 
utter disregard and inattention under the warnings that came in from the 
front and flank all through the day." But Doubleday has shown clearly 
that Devens recognized the danger, as did Schurz, by the course they act- 
ually took ; and that they would have risked a positive reprimand by going 
any farther. 2 

i Doubleday, p. 27. 

2 " As for Devens, who was nearest the enemy, it is quite probable that any attempt by him to 
change front to the west, previous to the attack, would have been looked upon by Howard as a reflection 
on his own generalship, and would have been met with disfavor, if not by a positive reprimand. . . . 
Devens could not disgarnish his main line without Howard's permission, and it is not fair, therefore, to 
hold him responsible for the disaster. As it is, he was severely wounded in attempting to rally his men." 
(Doubleday, p. 30.) For the manly reports of Devens, Schurz and Howard, vindicating their commands 
from the charge of cowardice, see Official Records, 39, pp. 631, 634, 658. General Hooker somewhat 
ungenerously reflected on this corps in his letter of May 7 to President Lincoln, saying of his troops, " It 
is no fault of theirs (if I may except one corps) that our efforts are not crowned with glorious victory. 
(Official War Records, 40, p. 438.) The most vivid description of the rout of the 11th Corps — an account 
by no means flattering — is in the report of Capt. Thos. W. Osborn, 1st New York Artillery, Chief of 
Artillery, Official War Records, 39, p 483 Good descriptions may also be found in Underwood's 33d 
Mass. and in Macnamara's Irish Ninth, p. 185. 



THE CHANCELLORSVTLLE CAMPAIGN. 95 

The battle of Chancellors ville is chiefly identified, in the public mind, 
with the humiliating surprise of May 2, though this was really only one 
event out of a series. Even during this very defeat the steadfastness 
of the 2d Corps, whose soldiers held their ranks unmoved while thou- 
sands of frightened men ran by them, is to be set against the stampede 
of the 11th Corps. In that unfortunate body, too, as is pointed out 
by Gen. F. A. Walker, an eye-witness, single regiments " behaved 
with great fortitude " amid the general stampede, one of these being, 
as there is good reason to think, the 33d Mass. The whole affair was 
also somewhat exaggerated by the prejudice existing in the oth&r army 
corps against the German troops, which made up the bulk of the retreat- 
ing force. 

In the assault upon Salem on May 3, Colonel Johns of the 7th Mass. 
Infantry, a West Point graduate, led a column of assault up the heights, 
ascending through a stony gorge, commanded by two howitzers. The col- 
umn consisted of the 7th Mass. and the 23d New York Infantry. Colonel 
Johns was severely wounded and Lieutenant-Colonel Harlow, commanding 
the regiment, slightly, and the 7th captured two pieces of artillery without 
firing a shot. In General Newton's words, " Colonel Harlow proved him- 
self a hero, as this was a charge not exceeded in brilliancy by any operation 
of the war." General Newton also said that "the 10th and 37th rendered 
their principal services at Salem Heights, and their coolness under fire and 
admirable discipline merited the warmest acknowledgments." The 7th was 
again in action near Salem Church and lost largely in the two encounters, 
including Capt. Prentiss M. Whiting and Lieut. Albert A. Tillson. Major- 
General Sedgwick, commanding the corps, says that "it is no disparage- 
ment to the other regiments of the corps to say that the steadiness and valor 
of the 6th Maine, 5th Wisconsin, 7th Massachusetts and the Vermont 
Brigade could not be excelled." He also mentions Col. (afterwards 
brigadier-general) H. L. Eustis as being "especially mentioned by hi 
brigade commander for gallant service, he having subsequently taken com 
mand of the brigade," and compliments the firing of the 1st Mass. Battery 
(McCartney's). 2 

After the battle or battles of Chancellors ville, General Hooker especially 
complimented in orders the conduct of the 2d Mass. Infantry (Col. S. M. 

1 Walker's 2d Army Corps, pp. 228, 229. . » Official War Records, 39, pp. 559-562. 



96 NARRATIVE. 



Quincy), as did also Brig. -Gee. Thos. Ruger, its brigade commander. In 
a prolonged contest, with successive lines of Confederate troops brought up 
to attack them, this brigade fought with great steadiness and bravery, much 
of the battle being in the midst of abatis and brush and " a regular hand-to- 
hand fight," as one officer says ; and they had to protect themselves with 
their bayonets long after their ammunition was exhausted. Colonel Quincy 
is among those complimented as having "displayed great bravery and 
handled their regiments with skill." Col. S. Colgrove, commanding the 
27th Indiana in this brigade, says, " To say that the three old regiments, 
the 2d Mass., 3d Wisconsin and 27th Indiana, fully sustained the reputa- 
tion they won at Cedar Mountain and Antietam, is the very highest com- 
pliment that can be paid them." 1 

It is interesting to notice that the remarkable qualities of Col. N. A. 
Miles (then of the 61st New York Infantry), although before recognized, 
came into notice more and more in the Chancellorsville battles, and are 
frequently mentioned in different reports, 2 culminating in this remarkable 
bit of foresight on the part of Brig. -Gen. John C. Caldwell, his brigade 
commander : "I greatly regret to report that Colonel Miles was severely 
if not mortally wounded on Sunday morning while handling the picket 
line Tfith masterly ability. I have had occasion heretofore to mention the 
distinguished conduct of Colonel Miles in every battle in which the brigade 
has been engaged. His merits as a military man seem to me to be of the 
very highest order. I know of no terms of praise too exaggerated to char- 
_ acterize his masterly ability. If ever a soldier earned promotion, Colonel 
Miles has done so. Providence should spare his life, and I earnestly 
recommend that he be promoted and intrusted with a command commensu- 
rate with his abilities." 3 Providence having complied with the kind sug- 
gestion of General Caldwell, the nation seems to have taken care of the 
rest. Apart from his "unexampled rapidity" of promotion, it is to be 
noticed that he received a medal of honor ' ' for distinguished gallantry in 

1 Official War Records, 39, pp. 709-712. General Ruger also compliments Lieutenant-Colonel Cogswell 
(severely wounded) and Major Mudge of the 2d Mass. Colonel Quincy's own modest report is in Official 
War Records, 39, p. 714. 

2 General Hancock, for instance, wrote that Colonel Miles " had great opportunity for distinction and 
availed himself thereof, performing brilliant services." (Official War Records, 39, p. 315.) Even as early 
as the battle of Fair Oaks, however, it is said of him by Gen. F. A. Walker that "a young lieutenant on 
the staff that day, fresh from civil life, showed there, to the admiration of all beholders, that address and 
gallantry which were to secure a progress of unexampled rapidity, and to make the name of Nelson A. 
Miles the pride of the volunteer soldiers of the Union." (2d Army Corps, p. 53.) 

s Official War Records, 39, p. 321. 



THE CHANCELLORSVILLE CAMPAIGN. 97 



the battle of Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863, while holding with his command 
a line of abatis and riflepits against a strong force of the enemy until 
severely wounded, while colonel 61st New York Volunteers, commanding 
the line of skirmishers in front of the 1st Division, 2d Army Corps." 

Col. N. J. Hall, brigade commander, expresses acknowledgments to 
Lieutenant Ferris (19th Mass.) and Lieutenant McKay (20th Mass.) who 
volunteered, with twenty-five men from each regiment, to cross the river in 
boats and dislodge the enemy from riflepits that menaced the builders of a 
bridge, but their services were not finally needed, though the boats were 
made ready. 1 These represented, it will be remembered, the same regi- 
ments which did a like service at Fredericksburg. Colonel Blaisdell, with' 
the 11th, was praised as usual. 2 He was " highly complimented by General 
Hancock for the manner in which himself and regiment performed the ardu- 
ous duties which devolved upon them on the extreme left, sustaining unaided 
the attacks made by the enemy to force that position during the entire day 
of May 2." 

Among those who fell during the three days at Chancellorsville were 
Gen. Amiel W. Whipple, Capts. Charles E. Rand of the 1st Mass. Infan- 
try, Alexander J. Dallas of the 16th and William G. Hewins of the 18th. 
Capts. George Bush and William Cordwell of the 13th had been killed by 
artillery fire at Fitzhugh's Crossing, being the only persons killed (April 
29-30). Lieut. A. E. Phillips, 1st Mass. Cavalry, was mortally wounded' 
at Rapidan Station (May 1). There fell also at Chancellorsville Lieut. 
Gerald Fitzgerald (2d), John Munn and John S. Harris (11th), Hiram 
Rowe and Samuel Savage (16th). To these should be added Col. William 
O. Stevens, a Massachusetts man, commanding the 70th New York Infantry, 
described by General Revere, his brigade commander, as "a truly splendid 
officer and magnificently brave." 3 

On the first day of the battle of Chancellorsville there took place a 
cavalry skirmish at Rapidan Station, Va. (May 1, 1863), when the only 
life lost was that of Lieut. A. E. Phillips of Chicopee, of the 1st Mass. Cav- 
alry. The fight at Brandy Station (June 9), in which the 1st Mass. Cavalry 
took active part, was the first instance where the Union cavalry really showed 
itself the equal of a similar Confederate force. In the much more important 

i Official War Records, 39, pp. 358-360. 

» Official War Records, 39, pp. 449-455. Colonel Blaisdell's report is on p. 451. 

s See his memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 147. 



98 NARRATIVE. 



cavalry battle of Aldie (June 17) the 1st Mass. Cavalry bore the brunt of 
the fight, charging through the town, capturing several prisoners and a 
battle flag, and holding the ground afterwards. Out of three hundred and 
fifty-eight who went into the fight, twenty-nine were killed or mortally 
wounded, forty-eight wounded (not mortally) and ninety missing. Lieut. 
Hugh Carey was mortally wounded, and Maj. H. L. Higginson and Capt. 
L. M. Sargent were left for dead on the field, though ultimately recovering. 
Lieuts. C. G. Davis, J. J. Higginson and L. N. Duchesney were taken pris- 
oners. 1 It was unquestionably the most important cavalry fight of the war. 
On June 27, 1863, General Hooker requested to be relieved of his com- 
mand, and Maj. -Gen. George G. Meade was his successor. 2 

XXI. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN. 
The Massachusetts troops serving in the Army of the Potomac (Major- 
General Meade, U. S. A., commanding) at the battle of Gettysburg, July 
1-3, 1863, 3 were the following : — 

First Army Corps (Doubleday). 
Second Division. — 1st Brigade, 13th Mass. Infantry, Col. S. H. 
Leonard; 2d Brigade, 12th Mass., Col. J. L. Bates. 

Second Army Corps (Hancock). 
First Division. — 2d Brigade, 28th Mass., Col. Richard Byrnes. 
Second Division. — 1st Brigade, 15th Mass., Col. G. H. Ward; 3d 
Brigade, 19th Mass., Col. A. F. Devereux; 20th Mass., Col. P. J. Revere. 

Third Army Corps (Sickles). 
Second Division. — 1st Brigade, 1st Mass., Lieut.-Col. C. B. Bald- 
win ; 11th Mass., Lieut.-Col. P. D. Tripp ; 16th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Waldo 
Merriam. 

1 See Crowninshield's 1st Cavalry, p. 143. 

2 Hooker's military standing is thus summed up by another Massachusetts officer : " As a corps' com- 
mander, or with orders to obey, unless jealousy warped his powers, he was unsurpassed in bravery, 
devotion and skill. For the burden of supreme command he had neither mental calibre nor equipoise. 
Self-sufficing stood instead of self-reliance." (Dodge's Bird's Eye View, p ; 134.) Few personal revela- 
tions in the war are more remarkable than a letter written by General Hooker to Secretary Chase (after 
the battle of Lookout Mountain) , in which he accuses Grant of false despatches, Meade of utter incapacity, 
and predicts of Sherman, " He will never be successful. Please remember what I tell you." (Official 
War Records, 55, p. 339.) For some of Hooker's strong points, see Cook's 12th Mass. Infantry, p. 99. 

s Official War Records, 43, p. 155. 



THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN. 99 



Fifth Army Corps (Sykes). 
First Division. — 1st Brigade, 18th Mass., Col. Joseph Hayes; 22d 
Mass., Lieut.-Col. Thos. Sherwin, Jr. ; 2d Brigade, 9th Mass., Col. P. R. 
Guiney; 32d Mass., Col. G. L. Prescott; Artillery Brigade (Capt. A. P. 
Martin), 3d Mass. Light Battery, Lieut. A. F. Walcott. 

Sixth Army Corps (Sedgwick). 
Third Division. — 2d Brigade (Col. H L. Eustis), 7th Mass., Lieut.- 
Col. F. P. Harlow; 10th Mass., Lieut.-Col J. B. Parsons; 37th Mass., 
Col. Oliver Edwards; Artillery Brigade, 1st Mass. Light Battery. 

Eleventh Army Corps (Howard). 
Second Division. — 2d Brigade, 33d Mass., Col. A. B. Underwood. 

Twelfth Army Corps (Slocum). 
First Division. — 3d Brigade, 2d Mass., Lieut.-Col. C. R. Mudge. 

Cavalry Corps. 
Second Division. — 1st Brigade, 1st Mass. Cavalry, 1 Lieut.-Col. G. S. 

Curtis. 

Artillery Reserve (Tyler). 

1st Volunteer Brigade, 5th Light Battery, Capt. C. A. Phillips (with 

10th New York Battery attached) ; 9th Light Battery, Capt. John Bigelow. 

In the battle of Willoughby Run or Oak Ridge (July 1, 1863), the 
opening scene of Gettysburg, the 13th, brigaded under Brig. -Gen. Gabriel 
R. Paul, was ordered into action against a force so much larger that the regi- 
ments of the brigade were detached and had no sufficient support from one 
another, the 13th being, moreover, on the extreme right. Colonel Leonard 
was wounded early and the command devolved on Lieut.-Col N. W. Batch- 
elder. It lasted for an hour, svhen the officer in command ordered a charge, 
capturing one hundred and thirty-two prisoners, including seven officers, 
but the exposed flank rendered a retreat finally necessary, during which 
about one hundred of the 13th were taken prisoners. Out of two hundred 
and sixty muskets in action, the whole loss in killed, wounded and missing 
was one hundred and eighty-nine. 2 The 12th (Col. J. L. Bates), a much 

1 This regiment actually served with the Sixth Army Corps, and on the right flank. 

2 Lieutenant-Colonel Batchelder's report is in Official War Records, 43, p. 298. 



100 NARRATIVE. 



larger regiment, lost one-eighth of its number, including Lieuts. Francis 
Thomas of Weymouth and Charles G. Russell of Boston. Both these regi- 
ments were in the second division of the First Corps, under Maj.-Gen. J. F. 
Reynolds, though temporarily commanded by Maj.-Gen. Abner Doubleday. 
The First Corps was, on this first day, in the words of its commander, 
"broken and defeated but not discouraged," and was "a mere advance 
guard of the army." The men captured were largely taken in the effort to 
reach General Steinwehr's division on Cemetery Hill, which was their rally- 
ing point. 1 

On the second day of Gettysburg (July 2), Massachusetts regiments 
were with General Sickles in his firm resistance to the Confederate attack ; 
these being the 18th and 22d and the 5th and 9th batteries. Col. W. S. 
Tilton, commanding brigade, says that "the officers and men showed the 
greatest coolness and courage." 2 In other parts of the line the heaviest 
losses fell on the 1st, 11th, 15th, 16th, 19th, 20th and 28th. In the after- 
noon, when two regiments (the 15th Mass., Col. G. H. Ward, and the 82d 
New York, Col. Huston) were sent forward to fill a gap in the lines, they 
sheltered themselves behind a hastily constructed breastwork of rails, and 
sustained a very severe attack of the enemy, both colonels being killed or 
mortally wounded, and both regiments forced back, losing also a number of 
prisoners. 3 Lieut. -Col. G. C. Joslin mentions with especial' commendation 
Maj. I. H. Hooper and Lieut. D. M. Earle, acting adjutant. 

The 28th Mass. was ordered on the second day to carry the position of 
the enemy on the crest of a wooded hill, and accordingly advanced over the 
crest and nearly to the bottom of the hill, when they in turn were obliged to 
retire, being flanked on both sides, and with a loss of nearly half the force 
carried in. 4 

The 32d Mass. (Col. Geo. L. Prescott) distinguished itself by holding 
its ground after the breach in Sickles's Corps was made. The 32d was in 
front, the 4th Michigan and 62d Pennsylvania being behind it. "When 
the attack commenced," says Col. J. B. Sweitzer, commanding brigade, 
' ' word was sent by General Barnes that when we retired we should fall 
back under cover of the woods. This order was communicated to Colonel 

i Doubleday's Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, p. 150. 2 Official War Records, 43, p. 698. 

a Report of Lieut.-Col. G. C. Joslin, Official War Records, 43, p. 423. See also pp. 371, 417. 
4 Colonel Byrnes's report is in Official War Records, 43, p. 387. 



THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN. 101 

Prescott, whose regiment was then under the hottest fire. Understanding 
it to be a peremptory order to retire then, he replied, ' I don't want to 
retire ; I am not ready to retire ; I can hold this place,' and he made good 
his assertion. Being informed that he misunderstood the order, which was 
only to tell him how to retire when it became necessary, he was satisfied, 
and he and his command held their ground manfully." ! As a result, 
Colonel Prescott was severely wounded. 

At 4 a.m. the 2d Mass. Infantry (Lieut. -Col. C. R. Mudge) was ordered 
to advance from behind its breastworks and charge, in company with the 
27th Indiana, a Confederate force which had taken possession of their un- 
occupied breastworks and which artillery had failed to disperse. In this 
charge Lieutenant-Colonel Mudge fell dead and four successive standard 
bearers were struck down, though the charge was but of four hundred yards 
and took but twenty minutes' time. There fell also in this charge, or were 
mortally wounded, Capts. Thomas R. Robeson and Thomas B. Fox and 
Lieut. H. ,V. D. Stone. 2 The works were not actually recaptured until 
several hours later, when the 2d Mass. occupied them again. The tree 
under which this fight took place is now in possession of the Massachusetts 
Historical Society. General Stoneman said once, "No regiment that ever 
served with me can show a better record than the 2d Mass." 3 

In the finest single incident of the battle, and perhaps of the war, the 
charge of Pickett's men upon the centre of the Union army and its repulse, 
the 2d Corps, containing many Massachusetts regiments, bore the first brunt 
of the attack. After two hours of what was, up to that time, the most for- 
midable cannonading of the war, — more than one hundred pieces of artil- 
lery concentrated on one spot, — wl^— Pickett's division rushed, ' ' with 
magnificent courage," up the long slope, in a charge which still excites the 
admiration of every visitor to the green hills of Gettysburg, there was a 
moment when the very fate of the Union was actually at stake. "In the 
very centre of the Union position crowning Cemetery Ridge wave the flags 

1 Official War Records, 43, p. 611. 

2 See memoirs in Harvard Memorial Biographies, II, 122, 151, 261, 328. 

3 For Lieut.-Col. C. F. Morse's graphic report of this action, see Official War Records, 43, p. 816. In 
the report of Col. S Colgrove, commanding brigade, he says, " I wish to state here that great credit is due 
the officers and men of Co. F, 2d Mass., as skirmishers. They advanced into the woods, where it was im- 
possible to tell friend from foe, and before they scarcely knew it were in the midst of a brigade of the 
enemy, from whom they captured twenty-three prisoners, and brought them in, with a loss of only two 
captured on their side" (p. 813). 



102 NARRATIVE. 



of Virginia and the Confederacy. . . . For an awful quarter of an hour the 
two lines stand confronting each other, here two hundred yards apart, there 
but forty, pouring in upon each other a close and unremitting fire. There 
was no shrinking. The Union infantry came up somewhat tumultuously, 
it is true, but courageously, and formed around the head of Longstreet's 
column, four ranks deep. Every field officer in Pickett's division except 
Pickett himself and one lieutenant-colonel had fallen. The field was won. 
One moment more and all is over. The most of the surviving Confederates 
throw themselves on the ground ; others seek to escape capture, and retreat 
hurriedly down the hill and across the plain,- which is once more shrieking 
with the fire of the artillery. . . . Thirty -three standards and four thousand 
prisoners are the fruit of that victory, . . . while in the Second Division 
[of the Second Corps] , on which fell the utmost weight of the great assault, 
five battalion commanders have been killed. Scarcely any regimental offi- 
cers remain un wounded." 1 

The 19th (Col. A. F. Devereux) and 20th (Capt. H. L. Abbott) were 
at one time especially exposed on the countercharge, but it ended in the 
capture of four flags by men of the 19th and in taking a very large 
number of prisoners. Colonel Devereux in his report especially compli- 
ments Lieut. Moses Shackley of his regiment, and Captain Abbott especially 
selects for praise Capt. (afterwards brevet brigadier-general) H. L. Patten, 
who was twice wounded, and Lieut. Henry Ropes, who was killed. 2 

More soldiers from Massachusetts than from any other State received 
medals of honor for special services in the battle of Gettysburg, all being 
from the 19th Mass. Infantry, namely: Corp. J. Gr. DeCastro (Co. I), for 
capture of flag of 19th Virginia; Sergt. B. F. Falls (Co. A), for capture 
of flag; Sergt. B. H. Jellison (Co. C), for capture of flag of 54th Virginia; 
Priv. John Robinson (Co. I), for capture of flag of 57th Virginia. 3 More 
than twenty years afterward Capt. Edmund Rice, then captain in the 5th 
U. S. Infantry, received a medal of honor "for conspicudus bravery in 
leading his regiment in the countercharge against Pickett's division, himself 

1 All these quotations are from the exceedingly vivid description of Pickett's charge by Gen. F. A. 
Walker in his Second Array Corps, pp. 298, 299. 

2 See their reports in Official War Records, 43, p. 442-447. Captain Abbott says of Lieutenant Ropes, 
"His behavior in this battle was more conspicuous for coolness and absolute disregard of personal danger 
than any I ever witnessed in any other man," and gives a generous and noble analysis of his character, 
which is quoted and endorsed by Gen. F. A. Walker in his Second Army Corps, p. 302. See biographies 
of Patten, Ropes and Abbott in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 443; II, 97, 357. 

* Official War Records, 44, p. 282. 



THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN. 103 



falling severely wounded in this the enemy's lines, in the battle of Gettys- 
burg, Pa., July 3, 1863, while serving as major, 19th Mass. Infantry." 

Among officers not already named who fell at Gettysburg (killed or 
mortally wounded) were Capts. John Murkland and H. P. Jorgenson (15th 
Mass.), Edwin Humphrey (11th Mass.), D. W. Roche, L. G. King and 
C. R Johnson (16th Mass.), Lieuts. W. B. Mitchell (11th Mass.), E. 
G. Buss (15th Mass.), C. K. Knowles (22d Mass.), George F. Brown 
(16th Mass.), Herman Donath and S. S. Robinson (19th Mass.), Sumner 
Paine 1 (20th Mass.), W. H. Barrows (32d Mass.), Henry Hartley (1st 
Mass.), with Christopher Ericson and A. H. Whitaker of the 9th Battery. 
A great loss was also sustained in Col. Paul J. Revere (20th Mass ), 
the second grandson killed of the Paul Revere of revolutionary fame, his 
brother, Dr. E. H. R. Revere, having fallen at Antietam. 2 

In Meade's somewhat belated pursuit of Lee, after Gettysburg, several 
Massachusetts regiments took part. At Auburn, Va. (Oct. 13, 1863), the 
10th Mass. Battery (Capt. J. H. Sleeper) received the especial thanks of 
Major-General Birney (commanding 1st Division, 3d Corps) "for their 
gallantry in repulsing the enemy's attack on the head of the column." 3 

In the "brilliant combat" 4 at Bristoe Station (October 14), in which 
"Warren's rear guard had a brush with Lee's whole army, the 15th, 19th and 
20th Mass. infantries were engaged with slight loss and the 18th, 22d and 
28th without loss. So in the running fight near Berryville, in which the 
34th Mass. Infantry was for the first time under fire, the loss in that regi- 
ment was slight, but its adventures many, and its trophies in the way of 
weapons and supplies considerable. 5 In this contest Corporal Gage of 
Co. E, bearing the State flag, was shot through the breast, as was another 
of the color-guard, Corporal Clark of Co. K, each dying without a word. 
Private McDaniels of Co. E, being hit in the foot, sat down, cut out the 
ball with his knife and recommenced firing. It was in this fight also that 
Lieut. Henry Bacon, when some of his company began bewailing by name 

i See memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, II, 477. 

9 Memoirs of both are in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 124, 219. 

3 Adjutant-General's report, January, 1864, p. 1011 ; Official War Records, 48, 312. 

* Dodge's Bird's Eye View, p. 167. 

6 A very animated description of this fight may be found in Lincoln's 34th Mass., p. 143, this being, 
perhaps, the most graphic, as to personal narrative, among the Massachusetts regimental histories, and 
all the more because quite unstudied. The reports of Col. G. D. Wells, as brigade commander, are in 
Official War Records, 48, pp. 486-489. 



104 NARRATIVE. 



the deaths of some comrades, remarked amid a storm of bullets, " Shut 
your mouths, boys, and let your rifles do the talking." J 

When Meade forced the passage of the Rappahannock in pursuit of Lee 
a number of Massachusetts regiments and batteries took part (Nov. 7, 
1863), only the 10th and 18th infantries sustaining losses, but not heavily. 2 
In the same way, in the more extended but somewhat ineffectual four days' 
operations at Mine Run, Va. (Nov. 26-30, 1863), many Massachusetts reg- 
iments of the three arms of the service were engaged, actual losses falling 
only on the 1st Cavalry and the 1st, 9th, 11th, 15th and 16th infantries. 
Brig. -Gen. D. A. Russell of Massachusetts was designated to convey to the 
Adjutant-General seven captured battle flags and staff, " because of his con- 
spicuous conduct as the leader of the storming party of the occasion." 3 

During the subsequent winter quarters of Meade's army there was little 
fighting, but a scattering party of the 2d Mass. Cavalry was surprised and 
defeated at Drainsville (near Leesburg), Va. (Feb. 22, 1864), ten of the 
party being killed, including Capt. J. Sewell Read of San Francisco, the 
commander, and seven wounded and fifty-seven taken as prisoners. 

During the month of July, 1863, there occurred draft riots in New York 
and a few other cities, during which some forces were ordered to New York 
from the front and placed for a time under General Butler, some of these 
being Massachusetts regiments, but fortunately little actual military collision 
was required. 4 

XXII. THE ARMY OP THE CUMBERLAND. 
The only Massachusetts troops forming part of the Army of the Cum- 
berland in 1863-64 were the 2d and 33d Infantry, but the service they 
rendered was important, and in the case of the latter peculiarly conspic- 
uous. Troops being called for from the east to reinforce Rosecrans, two 
army corps were hastily sent, the 11th under Howard, the 12th under 

• ' Lincoln, p. 145. 

2 The report of Col. Joseph Hayes (18th Mass.), commanding brigade, is in Official War Records, 48, 
p. 580, and reports from Capts. J. H. Sleeper (10th Mass. Battery) and A. P. Martin (3d Mass. Battery), 
on pp. 572, 583. 

3 Letter of Major-General Meade in Official War Records, 48, p. 491. General Russell's report pre- 
cedes. The storming party did not, however, consist of Massachusetts troops. 

4 Correspondence, etc., in regard to the draft riots may he found in Official War Records, 44, pp. 875- 
940. Reports not otherwise quoted from Massachusetts officers in regard to military movements at Gettys- 
burg will be found on pp. 71, 842, 853, 980; also in the preceding volume, 43, pp. 547-550, 607, 659, 673, 
688, 884, 886, 1043. There is one also (p. 650) from Lieut.-Col. J. D. Greene, 17th U. S. Infantry, .an 
officer of Massachusetts birth. 



THE ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 105 



Slocum. The first of these included the 33d Mass. (Lieut. -Col. Godfrey 
Rider, Jr., Steinwehr's division) and the second included the 2d Mass. 
(Colonel Cogswell, Williams's division). The orders arriving Sept. 24, 
1863, the troops travelled west by rail for a week ere reaching their new 
command. On October 29 a sudden call was made upon the 33d to carry 
a very steep fortified hill, some two hundred feet high, at Wauhatchie ; the 
task being intrusted by General Hooker to Col. Orland Smith (73d Ohio), 
brigade commander, who selected for the purpose his own regiment and 
the 33d Mass., some four hundred men in all. The steepness of the hill 
made it very difficult of ascent by daylight, and in the night it was a for- 
midable enterprise. When the Confederate breastworks were at last 
reached, a voice shouted in the darkness, "Don't fire on your friends," 
calling out in reply a frank announcement of the title of the regiment, 
which was followed by a volley in their very faces, killing or wounding 
nearly half their force ; Lieutenant Mudge, the adjutant, being among the 
former, and Colonel Underwood among the latter, his thigh being so shat- 
tered that amputation became necessary. Falling back for a short time, 
the regiment was re-formed and renewed the charge, carrying the fort, with 
the aid of the 73d Ohio, and capturing a hundred prisoners, with many 
small arms. Besides the adjutant, Lieut. W. P. Mudge, the list of killed 
or mortally wounded included Lieuts. Joseph P. Burrage of Cambridge, 
James Hill of Danvers and Oswego Jones of Fall River, with 32 enlisted 
men. More than 60 were wounded. No less an authority than General 
Thomas says, in congratulating General Hooker, " The bayonet charge of 
Howard's troops, made up* the side of a steep and difficult hill over two 
hundred feet high, completely routing the enemy from his barricades on top 
. . . will rank among the most distinguished feats of arms of this war." 1 
Again at Lookout Mountain, Nov. 24, 1863, the 33d took part in the 
" battle above the clouds," but with no casualty except in a few wounded and 
one missing. Col. Godfrey Ryder, Jr. (33d Mass.), was especially com- 
plimented in a report by Col. Orland Smith (73d Ohio, commanding bri- 
gade) , as was Lieut. E. M. Cheney of the same regiment, who served as 
brigade quartermaster. 2 Lieut. Arthur Macarthur, Jr. (then adjutant 24th 
Wisconsin), a native of Massachusetts, received a medal of honor "for 

i Official War Records, 54, p. 68. For a spirited report by Lieutenant-Colonel Ryder, see p. 103. 
The 33d went into action with only seven companies. 

8 Official War Records, 55, p. 375. Lieutenant-Colonel Ryder's own report follows, p. 376. 



106 NARRATIVE. 



coolness and conspicuous bravery in action in seizing the colors of his reg- 
iment and planting them on the captured works on the crest of Missionary 
Ridge, Nov. 25, 1863." " When the color sergeant was exhausted, he 
carried the flag in front of the regiment, cheering the men to follow him 
up the ridge." 1 Both the 2d and 33d took active part in the battle of Resaca 
(May 13-16, 1864), the former losing 5 killed or mortally wounded. The 
33d again made a fine charge, charging and carrying three fortified hills in 
succession, but having 24 killed or mortally wounded, 2 including Lieuts. 
H. J. Parker of Townsend and E. L. Bumpus of Braintree. At Cassville, 
Ga., both regiments were engaged (May 19-22), with small loss. At 
Kenesaw Mountain they had several engagements in June, the 33d making 
another fine charge, and losing 11 killed or mortally wounded, including 
the 2d lieutenant, C. H. Lord of Ipswich. By July 17 the 33d had been re- 
duced to a mere skeleton regiment. The 2d Mass. was in the breastworks 
before Atlanta from July 22, 1864, and on the 30th Lieutenant-Colonel 
Morse of that regiment, being field officer of the day, surprised the enemy's 
pickets in his front and captured them in their rifle-pits. The regiment was 
then ordered to the support of the picket line and hastily threw up breast- 
works. They were " within two hundred yards of the enemy's forts, and 
under a close and hot fire of his artillery, infantry and sharpshooters." 3 
Here the regiment remained for six hours, resisting successfully several 
efforts of the enemy to retake the hill where they were posted, having ex- 
pended two hundred rounds of ammunition per man. They were relieved at 
last by another regiment of the same brigade, the 3d New Jersey, with a 
loss of 4 killed and mortally wounded. On the fall of Atlanta, Sept; 2, 
1864, the regiment was placed on duty as provost guard, Colonel Cogswell 
being placed in command of the fort. 

At Averysboro', N. C, the two Massachusetts regiments were again 
engaged, the 2d losing 8 killed or mortally wounded and the 33d lost 1. 
As Sherman's army passed through the Carolinas and became united with 
the regiments which had served near the coast, various engagements took 
place, in one of which, at Kinston, N. C, the 23d Mass. (March 14, 1865), 
as previously stated, was involved and lost a few men. 



1 Report of Maj.-Gen. Carl von Baumbach, commanding regiment. Official War Records, 55, 208. 

2 Adjutant General's Report, January, 1865, p 780. 

3 Colonel Cogswell's own narrative, in Adjutant General's Report, January, 1868, p. 213. 



SHENANDOAH CAMPAIGNS. 107 

During a part of the above events a portion of the 9th Corps, under 
Brig. -Gen. R. B. Porter, was assigned to the Department of the Ohio, 
commanded by Maj.-Gen. A. E. Burnside. It included the 36th Mass. In- 
fantry (Maj. A. A. Goodell), the 29th (Maj. Charles Chipman), the 35th 
(Maj. Nathaniel Wales) and the 21st (Lieut.-Col. G. P. Hawkes). They 
had many toilsome marches and small engagements in Kentucky, Tennessee 
and Mississippi, having been transferred from North Carolina and having 
set out from Baltimore on March 24, 1863, to take part in the advance on 
Jackson, Miss., and the siege of Knoxville, Tenn. In the former attack 
several companies of the 36th Mass. did active duty as skirmishers on June 
11 before the city, their colonel being in command of the brigade ; and on 
the evacuation of Jackson the 35th Mass. in line of skirmishers were the 
first to enter the city, the 29th being the reserve. The losses of all these 
were small. 1 At Blue Springs, Tenn. (October 10), there was a skirmish 
without actual loss, but in which Major Goodell of the 36th Infantry, a 
most valuable officer, was severely wounded ; another at Lenoir's, Tenn. 
(November 15), without loss ; and one near Campbell's Station (November 
16 ) , in which the 29th and 36th lost slightly. In this case there was a sharp 
attack by Hood upon three small regiments (the 36th Mass., the 8th Mich- 
igan and the 45th Pennsylvania), which narrowly escaped capture, the 36th 
being at this time under command of Maj. (afterwards general) W. F. 
Draper. In the siege of Knoxville, Tenn., the 21st, 29th, 35th and 36th 
Infantry were all engaged, with small losses for each ; and it was the pick- 
ets of the 36th, under command of Capt. T. E. Ames of Co. B, which dis- 
covered and reported the raising of the siege by General Longstreet. 

XXIII. SHENANDOAH CAMPAIGNS. 

In the earlier portions of the war Massachusetts regiments took no part 
in the western campaigns, but an important part in the battle of Shiloh or 
Pittsburg landing 2 (April 6, 1862) was performed by Col. Everett Peabody 
of the 25th Missouri, a Massachusetts man and a Harvard graduate. He at 
that time commanded a brigade, and was so sure of the surprise which had 
been planned against the Union troops that he sent out a scouting party, 



> Official War Records, 37, pp. 561, 573 ; 51, pp. 552, 553, 580. 

2 " Some military critics hold that the fate of the Confederacy was determined on the fields of Shiloh." 
(Johnson's Short History of the Warof Secession, p. 143.) 



108 NARRATIVE. 



which was the first to discover the approach of the enemy, and then fell 
back skirmishing. Colonel Peabody's brigade was one of the few which 
were in line when the attack came on ; he rode to the front, in order to en- 
courage his men, and fell in fifteen minutes, receiving five wounds, — in the 
head, thigh, neck and body. His brigade retreated in good order, and his 
own regiment numbered six hundred on the day after the battle, which 
could not have occurred had not its colonel taken better care of his men 
than of himself. 1 

The history of the Shenandoah Valley campaigns really begins in 1862, 
when Jackson " defeated Fremont at Cross Keys, captured the garrison at 
Front Royal, drove Banks across the Potomac, and, by alarming Washing- 
ton, broke up the impending junction of McDowell and McClellan and the 
threatened capture of Richmond." 2 The part taken by Massachusetts troops 
in these proceedings was fortunately not large, and fell chiefly on the 
2d Mass. Infantry, which formed the rear guard during a large part of 
Banks's retreat, marched fifty-six miles in thirty-three hours, lost many 
killed and nearly a hundred prisoners, including its major, surgeon and as- 
sistant surgeon. Col. Geo. H. Gordon, its commander, won his promotion 
to a brigadier-generalship by his distinguished services on this retreat. At 
Front Royal and Winchester (May 23-25) the regiment lost some 16 killed 
and mortally wounded. 

In the overwhelming defeat of General Sigel at Newmarket, Va., May 15, 
1864, the 34th Infantry was the only Massachusetts regiment involved, and 
it did its best to sustain the artillery by which it was posted, one company 
being deployed as skirmishers on the river bank. 3 It made one remarkable 
charge with such energy that, on the order to retreat being given, Col. G. 
D. Wells, then in command, was compelled to take the standard bearer by 
the shoulders and force him to the rear. It afterwards held back the retreat 
while the whole line was giving way. Taking into action about 500 men, 
it lost about half of them in killed (32), wounded and prisoners, Lieut. - 
Col. W. S. Lincoln being among the latter. Colonel Wells was also 
wounded, but remained on the field. 

In the early and at last ineffectual campaign of General Hunter in the 
Shenandoah Valley, the hard-worked 34th Mass. Infantry had a hand in a 

1 See memoir in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 176. 

2 Pond's Shenandoah Valley in 1864 (Campaigns of the Civil War), p. 3. 3 Pond, p. 19. 



SHENANDOAH CAMPAIGNS. 109 



single brilliant victory, — that of Piedmont, June 5, when it crossed, as a 
part of Thoburn's division, a deep ravine to strike the right flank of the 
enemy. The division charged on the woods and heights, which were 
promptly abandoned by the Confederates, many of the latter rushing over 
the steep bank into the river. About 1,500 prisoners were taken by the 
Union troops, and the Confederate general, Vaughan, wrote to General 
Bragg, June 6, " Went into the fight yesterday with an aggregate of 5,600 ; 
I have not over 3,000 effectives." 1 The 34th Mass. lost on this occasion 
24. It took part also in the unsuccessful attack on Lynchburg, June 17- 
18, and in the affair at Snicker's Ferry, July 18 ; also at Winchester, Va., 
July 24-25, without loss. 

The Army of the Shenandoah, as reorganized under Maj.-Gen. P. H. 
Sheridan (Aug. 31, 1864), contained the following Massachusetts forces : — 

Cavalry Force. 
First Division. — 3d Brigade, 2d Mass. Cavalry, Lieut.-Col. Caspar 

Crowninshield. 

Sixth Army Corps. 

First Division. — 3d Brigade, 7th Mass. Infantry (detachment) ; 10th 
Mass. (detachment); 37th Mass., Col. O. Edwards; Artillery Brigade, 
1st Mass. Battery, Capt. W. H. McCartney. 

Nineteenth Army Corps. 

First Division. — 1st Brigade, 30th Mass., Lieut.-Col. F. H. Whittier. 

Second Division. — 1st Brigade, 26th Mass., Col. A. B. Farr; 2d Bri- 
gade, 3d Mass. Cavalry (dismounted), Col. L. D. Sargent; 3d Brigade, 
38th Mass., Col. J. P. Eichardson.- 

Army of West Virginia. 
1st Brigade, 34th Mass., Lieut.-Col. W. S. Lincoln. 

At the head of the 3d Brigade, first division of the large cavalry force, 
was Colonel Charles E. Lowell, with his own regiment, the 2d Mass. 
Cavalry, brigaded under him, all the rest of the brigade being regulars. 
This was the Massachusetts contingent under Sheridan in his Shenandoah 
campaign. This campaign was on the defensive until the opposing force 

1 Pond, p. 27. 



110 NARRATIVE. 



of Early was weakened by the detachment of Kershaw's force ; but after 
this there was no more delay. 

The battle of Opequon (or Winchester), Va., September 19, was, in 
the words of General Sheridan, " a most stubborn and sanguinary engage- 
ment, which lasted from early in the morning until five o'clock in the even- 
ing." It was testified by the same general that "the conduct of both 
officers and men was most superb." 1 An impetuous charge was made by 
Grover's division, including the 26th and 38th Mass. Infantry and the 
3d Cavalry (dismounted), upon a Georgia brigade. General Birge, com- 
manding the brigade containing the 26th, says, "As the troops entered 
the woods, I was ordered by General Grover to halt and hold that position, 
and not to go farther into the woods ; but the charge was so rapid and 
impetuous and the men so much excited by the sight of the enemy in full 
retreat before them that it was impossible to execute the order, and the 
whole line pressed forward to the extreme edge of the timber, some three 
hundred yards beyond the enemy's original position and to his rear on both 
flanks. The brigade was now far in advance of our own line." 2 The fresh 
troops of Rodes coming up, Grover's fell back, when Russell's division of 
the 6th Corps came up, struck the flank of Rodes's force, and, aided by 
the 5th Maine battery, again turned the tide and re-established the line. 
" On the left of the brigade," wrote General Upton, brigade commander, 
"the 37th Mass. Volunteers rendered invaluable service in supporting 
Stevens's battery." 3 Gen. D. A. Russell, himself a gallant Massachusetts 
officer, commanding a division, was killed by a piece of shell during the 
movement. " His death," said Sheridan, " brought sorrow to every heart 
in the army." In this engagement the Massachusetts troops losing most 
heavily were the 26th, 34th, 37th Infantry and the 3d Cavalry (dis- 
mounted). Battery 1 had 4 wounded only. The losses included Maj. E. 
S. Clark and Capt. E. W. Thayer of the 26th, Lieut. J. P. Haley of the 
30th and Lieuts. J. F. Glidden and J. F. Poole of the 3d Cavalry. These 
were all from the 19th Corps, arrived from Florida to take part in the 
campaign. At one time during this battle the brigade containing the 34th 
Mass., having been for some time stationary under fire, was notified by 
General Thoburn that they would be presently ordered to charge. "While 

i Official War Records, 91, p. 25. "Also spelled Opequan," Irwin, p. 370. 

2 Official War Records, 91, p. 326. s Official Records, 91, p. 173. 



SHENANDOAH CAMPAIGNS. Ill 

he was speaking, the 34th Mass. on the right, impatient at their constant 
great and increasing loss, sprang to their feet and started for the rebel 
battery alone ; almost at the same moment the long-looked for movement 
was made, our whole line went forward with a cheer, and the rebels were 
driven from the wall in utter rout." This is the description given in the 
report of Col. G. D. Wells, brigade commander, and he adds, "I desire 
to call especial attention to the conduct of Major Pratt and his regiment 
in the last charge," and mentions also the death of Capt. G. W. Thompson, 
" for a long time commanding the regiment, and a most valuable and gal- 
lant officer." 1 

In "the hurricane battle," as it has been called, of Fisher's Hill, Va. 

(September 21, 22), Massachusetts troops took an active part. Early had 

been already alarmed by the gradual approach of the Union troops, and 

was preparing, as he says, to retreat after dark, when at sunset the troops 

of Crook, who had been gradually approaching during the day, sprang 

upon him. "Had the heavens opened," writes one officer, " and we had 

been seen descending from the clouds, no greater consternation would have 

been created." 2 The 34th Mass. Infantry (Col. W. S. Lincoln) formed a 

part of the first attacking force ; then Rickett's division, including Battery 

A of the 1st Mass. Light Artillery, had joined it ; then came the rest 

of the 6th Corps, including parts of the 7th, 10th and 37th Mass. ; and 

the 19th, including the 26th and 38th. These troops, "taking up the 

charge, descended into the ravine of Tumbling Run, with a headlong rush 

over fields, walls, rocks and felled trees. Making their way across the 

brook, they were soon scrambling up heights that it had seemed madness 

to attack, while Sheridan and his admirable staff were on every part of the 

line, shouting ' Forward, forward everything ! ' and to all inquiries for 

instruction the reply was still ' Go on ; don't stop ; go on ! ' Formations 

were little heeded in the rush, but the whole Confederate line broke from 

its trenches." 3 General Early justly sums it up, " My whole force retired 

in considerable confusion." In this sudden attack and victory few men fell. 

At Tom's Brook (October 8, 9), a purely cavalry fight, where Sheridan 

directed Torbert to set off at daylight and whip the rebel cavalry or get 

whipped himself, Lowell's brigade, including his own regiment (the 2d 

1 Official Records, 90, p. 377. See Sheridan's Personal Memoirs (II, 14) , for his opinion of the Massa- 
chusetts regiments at this battle. 

s Pond's Shenandoah Campaign, p. 177. s Pond's Shenandoah, p. 177. 



112 NARRATIVE. 



Mass. Cavalry), were engaged; aud Torbert wrote afterwards that "the 
cavalry totally covered themselves with glory, and added to their list vic- 
tories . . . the most decisive the country has ever witnessed." They capt- 
ured prisoners, guns, ambulances, headquarters, wagons, "everything on 
wheels," it was said ; and the enemy were chased twenty-six miles. 1 It 
was after this that the joke was made that cannon sent from Richmond to 
the Shenandoah valley were marked "P. H. Sheridan, care of General 
Early." Early wrote to Lee, " the fact is, that the enemy's cavalry is so 
much superior to ours, both in numbers and equipment . . . that it is im- 
possible for ours to compete with it." This was in curious contrast with the 
comparative condition of the two forces at the outset of the war. At the 
easy but final victory of Waynesboro', March 2, 1865, only the 2d Cavalry 
of Massachusetts troops took part, with small loss. 

Early took Crook's command (Thoburn's division) completely by sur- 
prise October 13 at Hupp's Hill, near Strasburg, throwing shells among 
them while they were eating dinner, with guns stacked. Forming hastily 
in line, they encountered him, Wells's brigade (including the 34th Mass.) 
being on the left. Wells was obliged at length to retreat, having suffered 
severely ; and he himself was mortally wounded and fell into the enemy's 
hands. The Union troops suffered much more than the Confederates from 
this unexpected attack, although both sides had fought well. It was fol- 
lowed up by a much larger surprise and attack, leading to the battle of 
Cedar Creek', Oct. 19, 1864, which fell also at first on the same division 
(Thoburn's), still including the 34th Mass. 

The attempt of Early to surprise and overcome the vastly superior forces 
of Sheridan at this battle is pronounced by Irwin, the admirable historian 
of the 19th Army Corps, to have been one of exceptional daring. " It may 
be doubted," he says, " whether in the whole history of war an instance can 
be found of any similar plan so carefully and successfully arranged, and so 
completely carried out in detail, up to the moment." 2 The final shock fell 
on Thoburn's corps early in the morning, with such complete suddenness 
that their own guns were immediately turned against them, and every part 

i Pond's Shenandoah, p. 203. 

2 History 19th Army Corps, p. 412. Irwin's description of the battle of Cedar Creek is perhaps the 
best, unless it be that contained in that contributed by Col. Moses M. Granger, 122d Ohio, to the Sketches 
of War History, published by the Ohio Commandery of the Loyal Legion, III, 122-125. For Sheridan's 
opinion of the Massachusetts regiments at Cedar Creek, see his Personal Memoirs, II, 68. For Early's 
own account of the Valley Campaign, see Southern Historical Papers, III, 212. 



SHENANDOAH CAMPAIGNS. 113 

of the army was steadily driven back, although there was no .confusion or 
general breaking up ; the men held to their colors and every brigade and 
regiment retained its formation. Thoburn himself was killed. 

The 6th Corps (including the 7th, 10th and 37th Mass.) checked for 
a time the advance of the enemy, but the battle closed with a defeat so 
complete that the Union force had been driven back from one to four miles, 
when the sudden arrival of Sheridan turned defeat to victory and gave one 
of the most striking instances in all history of the extraordinary power 
sometimes condensed into a single man. Sheridan himself thus briefly 
describes it, in his despatch to Grant : "I hastened to Winchester, where I 
was on my return from Washington, and found the armies between Middle- 
town and Newton, having been driven back four miles. I here took the 
affair in hand and quickly united the corps, — formed a compact line of battle 
just in time to repulse an attack of the enemy." 1 But a more vivid descrip- 
tion is that of Col. B. W. Crowninshield of the 1st Mass. Cavalry : " One 
thing struck me as curious, — that the stream of men was now going 
towards Middletown. Astonished, I left Wheaton and galloped over to 
the pike, where I learned that Sheridan had just passed up, — as well as 
can be ascertained, it was half-past eleven o'clock, — and directly after, 
meeting General Forsyth, chief of staff, I received orders to go to New- 
town, form a guard, and collect all the stragglers I could and bring them 
up to the front. This I proceeded to do, and finally collected about two 
thousand men of all corps, and brought them up and turned them over to 
the command of General Crook, then on our extreme left and rear. From 
the time the 6th Corps became engaged, at about 9 a.m., until Sheridan 
came up, about noon, the attacks of the enemy were on the whole feeble 
and ineffective . . . Sheridan rode along his line, seeing for himself all 
his troops, and saying a word or two as he went along to encourage them, 
to which they responded with cheers." 

As a result, all that had been captured was recaptured, except the 1,429 
prisoners whom Early had sent to the rear, these being balanced by some 
1,200 taken by Sheridan, with twenty-four guns, fifty-six ambulance and 
many battle flags. The losses of the Massachusetts regiments were con- 
siderable, especially from the 26th, 30th, 34th and 38th Infantry and the 
2d and 3d Cavalry. They included Lieuts. Lyman James of the 3d Cav- 

1 Pond, p. 237. 2 Pond, p. 236. 



114 NARRATIVE. 



airy, Albert Jj. Tilden of the 26th Infantry, and Geo. F. Whitcomb of 
the 30th; also Maj. W. F. Clark of the 30th. No loss, however, was so 
deeply felt as that of Col. Charles Eussell Lowell, whose commission as 
brigadier-general had been signed that day. He commanded the reserve 
or regular brigade, which had held during the morning, dismounted, a stone 
wall from which it could not be displaced. Sheridan himself said of him : 
" I do not think there was a quality which I could have added to Lowell. 
He was the perfection of a man and of a soldier." 1 Gen. Merritt, com- 
manding the First Cavalry division, wrote of him : " His fall cast a gloom 
on the entire command. No one in the field appreciated his worth more 
than his division commander. He was wounded painfully in the early part 



of the day, soon after which I met him ; he was suffering acutely from his 
wound, but to ask him to leave the field was to insult him, almost ; a more 
gallant soldier never buckled a sabre. His coolness and judgment on the 
field were unequalled. . . . Young in years, he died too early for his 
country, leaving a brilliant record for future generations, ending a career 
which gave bright promise of yet greater future usefulness and glory." 2 The 
2d Mass. Cavalry, as a part of Lowell's command, had acted as rear guard 
during Sheridan's retreat from Cedar Creek to Strasburg, and had sustained 
some losses in killed and prisoners. Again it took part in a skirmish at 
Berryville, Sept. 3, 1864, and sustained, with the 34th Infantry, some 
slight losses. Again at Waynesboro', September 28, when Torbert's cav- 
alry corps was superintending the destruction of a railway bridge, having 
burned the station, it was attacked by a portion of Early's force, and the 
2d Mass. Cavalry lost some killed and prisoners. 

XXV. THE FINAL CAMPAIGN IN VIRGINIA. 
We now pass to the great campaign of the war, and to battles which 
dwarfed all that had preceded, for the Massachusetts troops as for all others. 
In 1864 Congress had passed a bill reviving the grade of lieutenant-gen- 
eral, and it had been conferred at once upon General Grant by President 
Lincoln, the two meeting for the first time when the commission was 
conferred. 3 

* Pond's Shenandoah Valley, p. 240. 

a Official War Records, 91, p. 451. There is a memoir of General Lowell in Harvard Memorial 
Biographies, I, 696. Jj'J r 

8 " A year and a month later, the war was ended, Grant was the foremost soldier in the world* and 
Lincoln was in his grave." (Johnson's Short History, p. 365.) ■• ■ '-J-' 



THE FINAL CAMPAIGN IN VIRGINIA. 115 

The Massachusetts troops operating against Richmond, Va., under 
Lieutenant-General Grant (May 5, 1864), were as follows : * — 

Army of the Potomac (Maj.-Gen. G. G. Meade). 
Provost Guaed. — 1st Mass. Cavalry, Cos. C and D (Capt. E. A. 

Flint). 

Second Army Corps (Hancock). 

First Division. — 2d Brigade, 28th Mass., Lieut.-Col. G. W. Cart- 
wright. 

Second Division. — 1st Brigade, 15th Mass. (Maj. J. Harris Hooper) ; 
19th (Maj. Edmund Rice) ; 20th (Maj. Henry L. Abbott). 

Fourth Division. — 1st Brigade, 1st Mass. (Col. N. B. McLaughlen) ; 

16th Mass. (Lieut.-Col. Waldo Merriam) ; 2d Brigade, 11th Mass. (Col. 

William Blaisdell) ; Artillery Brigade, 10th Mass. Battery (Capt. J. Henry 

Sleeper) . 

Fifth Army Corps (Warren). 

First Division. — 2d Brigade, 9th Mass. Infantry (Col. P. R. Guiney) ; 
22d Mass. (Col. W. S. Tilton) (with 2d Co. Sharpshooters attached) ; 32d 
Mass. (Col. G. L. Prescott) ; 3d Brigade, 18th Mass. (Col. Joseph Hayes). 

Second Division. — 1st Brigade (Col. S. H. Leonard), 13th Mass. 
(Capt. Chas. H. Hovey) ; 39th Mass. (Col. P. S. Davis) ; 2d Brigade, 
12th Mass. (Col. J. L. Bates) ; Artillery Brigade, 3d Battery (Capt. A. P. 
Martin) ; 5th Battery (Capt. C. A. Phillips). 

/Sixth Army Corps (Sedgwick). 
Second Division. — 4th Brigade (Brig.-Gen. H. L. Eustis), 7th Mass. 
(Col. T. D. Johns) ; 10th Mass. (Lieut.-Col. J. B. Parsons) ; 37th Mass. 
(Col. Oliver Edwards) ; Artillery Brigade, 1st Mass. Battery (Capt. W. 

H. McCartney). 

Ninth Army Corps (Burnside). 

First Division. — 1st Brigade, 35th Mass. (Maj. N. Wales) ; 56th Mass: 
(Col. C. E. Griswold) ; 57th Mass. (Col. W. F. Bartlett) ; 59th Mass. 
(Col. J. P. Gould) ; 2d Brigade, 21st Mass. (Lieut.-Col. G. P. Hawkes). 

Second Division. — 1st Brigade, 36th Mass. (Lieut.-Col. J. C. 
Whiton) ; Artillery, 11th Mass. Battery (Capt. E. J. Jones). 

i Official War Records, 67, p. 106. 



1X6 NARRATIVE. 



Cavalry Corps. 
Second Division. — 1st Mass. Cavalry (Lieut. -Col. L. M. Sargent). 

Artillery. 
3d Brigade, 9th Mass. Battery (Capt. John Bigelow). 

Army of the James (Butler). 

Tenth Army Coips (Gillmore). 

First Division. — 3d Brigade, 24th Mass. (Col. F. A. Osborne). 
Second Division. — 1st Brigade, 40th Mass. (Col. Guy V. Henry). 

Eighteenth Army Corps (W. F. Smith). 

Second Division. — 1st Brigade, 23d Mass. (Col. Andrew Elwell) ; 
25th Mass. (Maj. C. G. Attwood) ; 27th Mass. (Col. H. C. Lee). 

Unattached Troops. 

13th Co. Mass. Heavy Artillery (Capt. John Pickering, Jr.), as pon- 
toniers. 

The first great battle of the campaign was the battle of the Wilderness 
(May 5-7, 1864), and it was, very fortunately, almost unique of its kind. 
It was not, like the later contests, an affair of entrenchments ; cavalry had 
no important share in it, artillery little ; it came as near as the invention 
of gunpowder permitted to the earliest form of hand-to-hand fighting. No 
description of the merely confused and chaotic side of war by Tolstoi or 
Zola or Crane equals the simplest soldier's narration of t*he Battle of the 
Wilderness. It was, in Swinton's phrase, " a collision of brute masses." 1 
Once begun, it soon lost almost the semblance of military formation. Men 
could not see their own officers, keep in their own ranks or even know 
whom they were fighting. In the dense woods portions of regiments fired 
into one another. Badeau describes the region as " one tangled mass of 
stunted evergreen, dwarf chestnut, oak and hazel, with an undergrowth of 
low-limbed bristling shrubs, making the forest almost impenetrable. . . . 
A wrestle as blind as at midnight ; a gloom that made manoeuvres imprac- 
ticable ; a jungle where regiments stumbled on each other and on the enemy 

1 Decisive Battles of the War, p. 383. 



THE FINAL CAMPAIGN IN VIRGINIA. 117 

by turns, firing sometimes into their own ranks, and guided often only by 
the crackling of the bushes or the cheers and cries that arose from the 
depths around." Gen. F. A. Walker, who was also in it, after endorsing 
this description by quoting it, adds : "Of those that survived, many had 
not beheld an enemy, yet the tangled forest had been alive with flying- 
missiles ; the whistling of the bullets had been incessant ; the very trees 
seemed peopled by spirits that shrieked and groaned during those hours of 
mortal combat." 1 He adds: "All the peculiar advantages of the Army 
of the Potomac were sacrificed in the jungle fighting into which they were 
thus called." 

In this battle, so remote from the modern type of contest (with its 

tactics, its entrenchments, its long-range firing and its smokeless powder), 

twenty-three Massachusetts infantry regiments were engaged, with losses in 

killed and mortally wounded varying from ninety-four to one, and making 

in the aggregate nearly five hundred. The regiment suffering the severest 

loss was the 57th, or " Second Veteran" Regiment, under Col. W. F. 

Bartlett, and that having the smallest the 13th, which had taken elsewhere 

its ample share. The 57th took into battle, according to Fox's tables, 545, 

and had 94 killed or mortally wounded, this being 17 per cent., or the 

largest among all the regiments engaged. 2 The others were the 1st, 7th, 

9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 15th, 16th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 21st, 22d, 28th, 32d, 

36th, 37th, 39th, 56th, 58th and 59th. Those suffering most seriously, 

after the 57th, were the 37th, 9th, 20th and 10th, in the order here given. 3 

The 35th Mass. Infantry was detailed as a guard for the supply trains, and 

met with no loss, as was also the case with the 3d, 5th, 9th, 10th and 11th 

light batteries, which were also engaged. In this battle Col., afterwards 

Gen., W. F. Bartlett was very severely wounded in the head, and did not 

again return to his regiment ; 4 and among the killed or mortally wounded 

in the regiment were Capt. J. W. Gird and Second Lieut. J. M. Childs, both 

of Worcester. Other Massachusetts officers killed or mortally wounded 



1 Walker's 2d Army Corps, p. 414. 

2 Fox's Regimental Losses, p. 30. The percentage of this regiment, though it served actively for less 
than a year, was the highest among the Massachusetts regiments, and highest, with two exceptions, in the 
whole army. (Fox, p! 8.) 

3 The details of casualties in all these cases will be found under the head of the respective regiments, 
later in the volume. 

< " Brigadier-General Webb speaks highly of the conduct of Colonel (now brigadier-general) Bartlett 
of the 57th Mass." (General Hancock's report, Official War Records, 67, p. 326.) 



118 NARRATIVE. 



were Maj. Henry L. Abbott (20th Mass.), of whom General Hancock said : 
" This brilliant young officer, by his courageous conduct in action, the high 
state of discipline in his regiment and his devotion to duty at all times, 
had obtained the highest reputation among his commanding officers. His 
loss was greatly deplored." 1 Capt. Joseph S. Hills and Lieut. J. U. 
Woodfin (16th Mass.) ; Capt. J. A. Mclntyre and C. P. Smith (28th 
Mass.) ; Col. C. E. Griswold (56th Mass.) ; Lieut. -Col. David Allen, Jr. 
(12th Mass.) ; Capts. J. W. McNamara, W. A. Phelan, Lieuts. C. B. Mc- 
Ginnisken and N. C. Flaherty (9th Mass.) ; A. W. Midgley and W. A. 
Ashley (10th Mass.) ; and Joseph Stuart (13th Mass.) were all killed or 
mortally wounded in the Battle of the Wilderness. 2 For "gallantry in 
action " in this battle Color-Sergeant Leopold Karpeles (Co. E, 57th Mass.) 
received a medal of honor. 

Near Port Walthal, Va. (May 6-7), the 23d, 25th and 27th Mass. In- 
fantry were engaged, and at Todd's Tavern (May 4, 7) the 1st Cavalry, 
but with small losses ; these being only preliminary to the next great 
battle, that of Spotsylvania (May 8-18). In this prolonged and intermit- 
tent battle, the very heaviest casualties of all — including both killed and 
wounded — came, with one exception, upon the 1st Mass. Heavy Artil- 
lery. Its casualties (390) were exceeded only by those of the 1st Maine 
Heavy Artillery (481), no infantry regiment rising above 301. The two 
Massachusetts infantry regiments attaining very high record in both re- 
gards were the 39th (Robinson's division, 5th Corps) and the 32d (Grif- 
fin's division, 5th Corps) ; while several regiments exceeded the latter in 
killed and mortally wounded alone, namely, the 22d, 9th, 37th, 57th, 28th 
and 56th. 

At the formidable defence of the once-captured " Salient," or " Bloody 
Angle," it was claimed for the brigade of Col. Oliver Edwards (37th Mass. 
Infantry) that it fought longer than any other brigade of the 6th Corps ; 
and for the 37th Mass. Infantry — one of two Massachusetts regiments 
in that brigade, the other being the 10th — that it was in action contin- 
uously for more than twenty hours, during which time it fired more than 
four hundred rounds per man. At one time the guns became so foul that 

i Official War Records, 67, p. 326. 

2 Official War Records, 67, p. 134. For reports of Massachusetts officers on this battle, see, in the same 
volume, those of Col. Oliver Edwards (p. 672), Col. N. A. Miles (p. 370), Gen. R. B. Potter (p. 927), Col. 
W. S.Tilton (p. 559). 



THE FINAL CAMPAIGN IN VIRGINIA. 119 

,'; 

they could be used no longer, when they were exchanged for guns of 
another regiment. 1 General McAllister's Brigade of the Fourth Division, 
including the 1st and 16th Mass. Infantry, also took a most active part. 2 

General Hancock in his report speaks of the "magnificent charge" 
made by Birney's and Barlow's division on the 12th of May, and says, " it 
stands unsurpassed for daring, courage and brilliant success." 3 These 
divisions included, as will be seen by referring to the list of regiments, 
many Massachusetts organizations. In his report of flags captured, he 
mentions First Sergeant S. G. Viall and Sergeant Daniel Murphy (both 
of 19th Mass.) as each capturing a flag. 4 The latter received a medal of 
honor soon after. Private F. M. Whitman (Co. G, 35th Mass.) also re- 
ceived one, ten years later, "for distinguished services in action at An- 
tietam and Spotsylvania." The second brigade of Barlow's division in the 
2d Army Corps, that division which, according to Gen. F. A. Walker, 
"made skirmishing a profession," 5 included the 28th Mass., Lieutenant- 
Colonel Cartwright. One of the most distinguished division commanders 
(in the 6th Corps) was Brig.-Gen. David A. Eussell of Massachusetts ; 
while another (in the 9th Corps) was Brig.-Gen. T. G. Stevenson ; and 
among the brigade commanders were Brig.-Gen. H. L. Eustis, Col. N. A. 
Miles and S. H. Leonard, all of Massachusetts. Col. N. A. Miles won at 
this battle his promotion as brigadier-general, 6 and " among regimental com- 
manders Col. William Blaisdell of the 11th Mass. Infantry deserves especial 
mention for unflinching determination in holding his line against the most 
desperate assaults." 7 

The most distinguished Massachusetts officer killed at Spotsylvania was 
Brig.-Gen. Thomas Greely Stevenson, originally colonel of the 24th 
Mass. Infantry, who had served with distinction in North and South Caro- 
lina, and Was at the time of his death in command of the First Division of 
the 9th Army Corps. Another important officer who fell was Lieut. -Col. 
Waldo Merriam of the 16th Mass. Infantry, who had rendered valuable ser- 

> General Edwards's Brigade at the Bloody Angle, by James L. Bowen, in Century War Book, IV, 177. 

2 See description by Gen. Robert McAllister in Century War Book, IV, 176. 

s Official War Records, 67, p. 339. 4 Official War Records, 67 ; p. 348. 

6 See his eloquent description of the way they did their work (2d Army Corps, 451). 

6 " Generals Miles and Brooke had been conspicuous on every battlefield . . . not more for their 
indomitable valor than for their command over men ; their calm intelligence, over which the smoke of 
battle never cast a cloud ; their resistless energy in assault ; their ready wit and abounding resources in 
disaster." (Walker's 2d Army Corps, p. 479.) 

' Walker's 2d Army Corps, p. 479. 



120 NARRATIVE. 



vice as field-officer of the day in Birney's division, a "brave and able" 
soldier, in Hancock's phrase. 1 On earlier days of the prolonged conflict 
Lieut. G. B. Simonds of the 15th Mass. had fallen, with Lieuts. Edward 
Sturgess and L. E. Hibbard, of the 20th. On May 12 died Capt. M. H. 
Warren of the 1st Mass. Infantry and Lieut. J. J. Ferris of the 19th ; on 
May 18 Maj. A. J. Lawler and Capts. James Magner and W. F. Cochrane 
of the 28th Mass. In the contest of the heavy artillery regiments on May 
19 among the killed or mortally wounded were Maj. F. A. Rolfe, Capts. 
W. G. Thompson and A. A. Davis and Lieuts. Edward Graham and 
Charles Carroll. All these officers, with multitudes of enlisted men whose 
names would now be difficult even to enumerate and impossible to print, — 
nearly five hundred in all, — were the victims of Spotsylvania, a battle 
which brought to Massachusetts the heaviest losses of the war, those of 
the Wilderness being next. 2 It was as full of hand-to-hand contests as 
the Wilderness, not, however, among trees, but among fortifications ; a 
battle where men were crowded so close that they touched each other over 
breastworks and sometimes drew one another bodily over ; one in which 
they shot and stabbed each other through the crevices of the works ; 
where dead bodies were piled three or four deep, the one upon the other, 
and where thick trees were actually cut down by the rain of bullets. 3 

Other officers killed at Spotsylvania, or in the various engagements 
which were a part of it, were Lieuts. Henry W. Nichols (7th Mass. 
Infantry), James O'Neil and Archibald Simpson (9th Mass.) ; Maj. D. F. 
Parker, Capt. J. H. Wetherell and Lieuts. E. B. Bartlett and A. E. Mun- 
yan (10th Mass.) ; Capt. J. S. Stoddard and Lieuts. E. J. Kidder and 
William Robinson (12th Mass.) ; Lieuts. C. W. Whitcomb (13th Mass.) 
and G. B. Simonds (15th Mass.) ; Capts. Benjamin Davis (22d Mass.), 
Robert Hamilton (32d Mass ) and S. H. Bailey (36th Mass.) ; Lieut. H. 
W. Daniels (36th Mass.) ; Capt. F. yV. Pease and Lieuts. G. E. Cooke and 
Joseph Follansbee (37th Mass.) ; Lieut. I. D. Paul (39th Mass.) ; Capt. 
W. H. Harley and Lieut. F. G. Ogden (58th Mass.) and Lieut. G. J. Morse 
(59th Mass.) 

i Official Army Records, 67, p. 339. 

3 Spotsylvania, 496; Wilderness, 463; Cold Harbor (including Bethesda Church), 425; Antietam, 
370; Gettysburg, 340 ; Petersburg, 256 : Fredericksburg, 222. 

3 For vivid descriptions of the battle, see Century War Book, IV, 174-178; Walker's 2d Army Corps, 
pp. 441-490 ; Army and Navy Journal, I, 629, 641. For reports not already mentioned by Massachusetts 
officers, see those of Colonel Edwards (Official War Records, 43, p. 672), General Miles (p. 370) and Capt- 
I. H. Sleeper (p. 516). 



THE FINAL CAMPAIGN IN VIRGINIA. 121 

In the expedition on the south side of James River, in the battle of 
Swift Creek or Arrowfield Church, May 9-10, General Heckman's " Star 
Brigade," including several Massachusetts regiments, had an extremely 
arduous experience. " All the hardships incident to four days and nights 
under a drenching rain, without shelter of any kind, so close to the enemy's 
lines that but once could fires be built, and some part of the regiment on 
picket or skirmishing all the time, were borne without murmurs or com- 
plaint." 1 Outflanked and surrounded, finally, they fired until their ammu- 
nition was gone, then charged in vain, then retreated in perfect order. At 
one time they repulsed a charge of the enemy, during which the 25th Mass. 
Infantry and the 25th South Carolina found themselves face to face. The 
25th Mass. lost 14 killed (including Lieut, C. E. Upton), 2 the 23d and 27th 
also losing, while the 40th was present but not seriously engaged. At 
Ashland (May 11) the 1st Mass. Cavalry, being detached with others to 
make a sudden attack upon Ashland Station, lost 6 killed, including Lieut. 
E. P. Hopkins of Williamstown. At Drewry's Bluff (May 12-16) the 
" Star Brigade," with the 4th Cavalry (1 battalion), again met the enemy, 
with much heavier losses than at Swift Creek, the losses falling on the 23d, 
24th, 25th, 27th and 40th Mass. Infantry. On the first day a portion of the 
enemy's line of defence was carried with small loss ; on the 16th Butler was 
forced back to his entrenchments, the Confederates entrenching strongly in 
front, thus leaving him " bottled up," in Grant's celebrated phrase, and re- 
quiring but a small force of the enemy to keep him there. 3 

"Warren's and Hancock's fight at North Anna" (May 23-27, 1864), 
wrote Gen. M. V. MacMahon, "had been fierce but ineffective, resulting 
only in slaughter, of which, as usual, a sadly disproportioned share was 
ours." 4 This loss was, however, distributed so widely over many regiments 
as not to fall very heavily on any one, — these regiments being the 9th, 11th, 
12th, 19th, 20th, 22d, 32d, 35th, 36th, 39th, 56th, 57th, 58th and 59th In- 
fantry ; the 1st Heavy Artillery and the 9th Battery. Among these the 

1 Official War Records, 68, p. 158. (Report of Col. Orson Moulton, lieutenant-colonel commanding 
25th Mass.) In this battle Colonel Pickett was brigade commander, General Heckman having been taken 
prisoner. For other reports of the Massachusetts officers, see Official War Records, 68, pp. 155-160. 

2 Colonel Pickett pays a fine tribute to this young officer. Official War Records, 68, p. 156. 

3 Grant's report as lieutenant-general, dated July 22, 1865. See the text in Century War Book, IV, 147. 
General Beauregard's statement of the affair, from the Confederate side, was printed in the North Ameri- 
can Review for March, 1887 (CXLIV, p. 244), and (condensed) in the Century War Book, IV, 195; and 
the Union side was given by Gen. W. F. Smith, in Century War Book, IV, 206. See also Army and 
Navy Journal, I, 659. 4 Century War Book, IV, 214. 



122 NARRATIVE. 



heaviest loss in killed and mortally wounded fell on the 57th. Other regi- 
ments present were the 13th, 15th, 16th, 18th, 28th, 32d, 37th, with the 3d, 
5th, 10th, 11th, 14th batteries, some of these having a few wounded but 
none killed. 

In the efforts to cross the Totopotomoy River (May 29-31) the Massa- 
chusetts regiments incurring small losses in killed and mortally wounded 
were the 15th, 16th, 19th, 21st, 22d, 28th, 32d (the largest loss), 58th 
Infantry, the 1st Heavy Artillery and the 3d Battery. Other regiments 
engaged were the 12th and 20th, with the 9th and 14th batteries. Capt. 
D. C. Mumford (19th Mass.) was among the killed. 

At Bethesda Church (June 1-3), — the action of the right wing at the 
terrible Cold Harbor, — the largest loss fell on the 36th Mass. Infantry 
(17 killed, 33 wounded) and next on the 32d and on the 21st; but also 
in a smaller degree on the 9th, 12th, 13th, 22d, 29th, 35th, 56th and 
57th Infantry, and the 5th, 9th and 10th batteries. The 19th, 20th, 
39th and 58th were also present, with the 11th and 14th batteries, but 
without loss. 

The main battle of Cold Harbor (June 3) 1 was perhaps the most unavail- 
ing, as it was the most desperate, battle of this Richmond campaign. Had 
the Confederate general controlled the action of both sides, he could have 
hardly had the battle conducted more to his liking than it was. He wished 
Grant to be the assaulting party, and was sure of his own entrenchments 
and of the disposition of his troops. Burnside at Petersburg hardly under- 
took a task more desperate, nor was his error so costly. " Out of the 
gray dawn, eighty thousand -men rush forward upon the enemy in his en- 
trenched lines, meet with a bloody repulse and retire to cover themselves 
with such works as they can most speedily erect to hold the advanced 
ground which some of them have gained. The assault has failed in a brief 
ten minutes. All the fighting is over in less than an hour. Eight thousand 
men have fallen. The enemy has lost but a tithe of this number." 2 Sad- 
dest of all was the vast number of wounded who expired in the narrow 
space between the hostile lines, on the days following the battle, simply 
from the inability of their own friends to succor them. 

In this battle of Cold Harbor the most formidable loss fell on the 25th 

i Some historians, as Fox, treat Bethesda Church and Cold Harbor as separate engagements ; others, 
like Walker, as but one battle. Fighting continued irregularly for twelve days, apart from the unavailing 
special assault which is identified in history with that day. 

2 Dodge's Bird's Eye View of our Civil War, p. 219. 



THE FINAL CAMPAIGN IN VIRGINIA. 123 



Mass. Infantry, which reported 300 for duty that morning and lost 69 
killed or mortally wounded, including 6 officers, Capt. Thos. O'Neill 
Lieuts. Wm. Daley, Henry McConville, Henry Matthews, Chas. H. Pelton 
and James Graham ; the wounded and missing making up the total list of 
regimental casualties to 215, — more than two-thirds of the whole num- 
ber. 1 Another regiment suffering heavily was the 58th Mass., of which 
Fox says that it ' ' moved against the works . . . with a line whose steadi- 
ness and precision elicited praises from all who saw it, winning the compli- 
ments of both brigade and division commanders." 2 It lost 31 in killed and 
mortally wounded, including Maj. Barnabas Ewer, Jr., Capts. Chas. M. 
Upham and Thos. McFarland, with Lieut. W. H. Burbank ; the 27th 
Mass. losing 32, including its major, William A. Walker, Capt. E. K. 
Wilcox, Lieuts. Frederick C. Wright, Samuel Morse and E. H. Coombs. 
The 28th lost fewer, but the loss included its colonel, Richard Byrnes, 
commanding brigade, 3 and Lieut. James B. West. There fell also Capts. 
J. H. Baxter (22d Mass.) and C. F. Pray (18th Mass.) at Bethesda 
Church, Capt. R. J. Cowdin (56th Mass.), Lieut.-Col. G. E. Marshall, 
Lieuts. G. C. Bancroft and Edward Carleton (40th Mass.), John B. 
Thompson (19th Mass.). The whole loss of Massachusetts officers was 
not, however, more than two-thirds as great as at Spotsylvania, although 
considerably larger than at the Wilderness. 4 

General Grant recognized frankly that the charge ordered on June 3 
at Cold Harbor was the one battle which he thoroughly regretted. 5 He 
said: " Cold Harbor is, I think, the only battle I would not fight again 
under the circumstances," and again in his Personal Memoirs: "I have 
always regretted that the last assault at Cold Harbor was ever made." 
He had ordered Meade to suspend the attack whenever it should prove 
clearly hopeless, and the heavy fighting lasted less than an hour; but 
it has always been regarded as the greatest mistake of the war on the 
Union side. 6 

i Fox's Regimental Losses, p. 167. Compare Casualties of War in Army and Navy Journal, XXV, 
818. Putnam, in Co. A, 25th Mass. (p. 289), describes the fine charge of the 25th at Cold Harbor. 

* Fox, p. 176. 

3 "An officer of the regular army; a good disciplinarian in camp; cool and resolute in action; 
mingling in just proportion impetuosity with sound judgment." Walker's 2d Corps, p. 512. 
« Official War Records, 67, pp. 134, 150, 181. 

* Young's Around the World with President Grant, II, 304. Grant's Memoirs, II, 276. 

« " It was as useless and almost as costly as Lee's attack upon Meade's centre at Gettysburg. But we 
do not read that any of Grant's lieutenants protested against it, as Longstreet protested against the attack 
on Cemetery Ridge." Johnson's Short History, p. 396. 



124 NARRATIVE. 



Other regiments losing valuable lives were the 7th, 10th, 11th, 13th, 
15th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 22d, 23d, 37th, 40th, 56th and 59th Infantry; 
the 1st Heavy Artillery, and the 1st, 5th and 10th batteries. The 12th, 
16th, 35th, 36th, 39th, 57th Infantry and the 3d and 14th batteries 
were present or engaged, but without loss of life. Corp. David P. Casey 
(Co. C, 25th Mass.) received a medal of honor for his bravery at this 
battle, as did Corp. Orlando P. Boss (Co. F, 25th Mass.). Lieut.-Col. 
Guy V. Henry (7th United States Cavalry) also received a medal "for 
noteworthy and conspicuous gallantry while colonel of 40th Mass'. Volun- 
teers, leading the assaults of his brigade upon the enemy's works at 
Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864, where he had two horses shot under 
him, one while in the act of leaping over the breastworks of the enemy." 
More Massachusetts regiments were engaged in the first assaults on 
Petersburg than in any battle of the war, although the total of losses was 
not so great as in some battles, nor did any single regiment, except the 
1st Heavy Artillery, lose so heavily ; that having 68 killed or rnortalty 
wounded in the successive assaults. The whole number of organizations 
sustaining losses was no less than twentj^-five. This included the 10th, 
11th, 15th, 16th, 19th, 20th, 21st, 22d, 25th, 27th, 28th, 29th, 32d, 
36th, 37th, 39th, 40th, 56th, 57th, 58th, 59th Infantry; 1st Heavy 
Artillery, and 5th, 9th and 14th batteries. The 12th and 18th Infantry 
and the 15th Battery were also in the battle. The 56th lost 21 killed 
or mortally wounded ; the 57th, 20 ; the 27th, 19 ; the 58th, 12 ; and 
all others less. 

Among the killed were Col. Geo. L. Prescott (32d Mass.), Capts. 
Charles Goss (21st Mass.), Amos Buffum (36th Mass.), Lewis P. Caldwell 
(1st Heavy Artillery), Samuel A. Bean (59th Mass.), Lieut. S. G. Gilbreth 
(1st Sharpshooters), J. H. Crawley (56th Mass.), Edward I. Coe (57th 
Mass.), O. L. Farnham (1st Heavy Artillery). 

Among the prisoners taken by the Confederates in the sharp surprise 
at the Weldon Railroad (June 22) was included the 15th Mass., the small 
remnant of which was captured almost bodily. 1 In this disaster Capt. 
Joseph W. Kimball, 1st Mass. Infantry, lost his life, and on the day 
following Col. Wm. Blaisdell, 11th Mass. Infantry, who had distinguished 

i " The loth Mass , which, after losing 318 men, had emerged from the woods about Dunker Church, 
Sept. 17, 1862 (Antietam), bearing not only its own but a Confederate color, but which now, a mere hand- 
ful, was captured almost entire, with its tattered flag." Walker, 2d Army Corps, p. 547. 



THE FINAL CAMPAIGN IN VIRGINIA. 125 

himself at Cold Harbor, and indeed everywhere else, was killed on the 
skirmish line ; his brevet as brigadier-general being afterwards dated 
back to that day. 

The Massachusetts troops took part — generally by one or two regi- 
ments at a time — in various skirmishes during the Petersburg campaign, 
generally with small loss; as the 4th Cavalry near Petersburg (June 10), 
the 5th Cavalry at Baylor's Farm (June 15), the 1st Cavalry at Samaria 
Church (June 24), a detachment of the 2d Cavalry at Aldie (July 6), 
and the 32d Infantry with the 10th Battery in reserve at Deep Bottom 
(July 21). A more important affair, also at Deep Bottom, occurred on 
July 27-28, when the 28th Mass., as a part of Barlow's skirmish line, 
under command of Colonel Lynch (183d Pa.) and under the immediate 
direction of General Miles, advanced with two other regiments against 
entrenchments held by both infantry and artillery, and did it so skill- 
fully as to carry them by skirmishers alone, capturing four twenty-pound 
Parrott guns. 1 At later periods of the fight the 19th and 20th Mass. 
and 1st Heavy Artillery were in action with small loss, and the 11th and 
26th Infantry, with the 10th Battery, without loss. 

In the terrible disaster of the Mine (or the Crater) at Petersburg 
(July 30) it is rather a satisfaction to know that Massachusetts had but 
a moderate share. It is one of the few affairs which seem to have been 
so thoroughly mismanaged that the friends of the Union cause prefer 
to pass them lightly by. 2 

i " Never, I think, did men of the 2d Corps so greatly enjoy riding Confederate cannon into camp." 
Walker, p. 563. 

2 " The wretched fiasco of the 30th of July. . . . Had adequate arrangements been made and had the 
troops at hand been put in, with even the lowest degree of vigor, noon of that day must have seen 
Petersburg in our power and a third of Lee's army lopped off at a blow. . . . Had the division assigned 
to the assault been properly led, it could have gone straight to the crest which overlooked the enemy's 
works, receiving scarcely a Bhot in its way. But neither General Ledlie, the commander of the leading 
division, nor General Ferrero, commanding the first supporting division, was in a position from which he 
could see either the enemy'B line or his own troops. . . . Never before or after, in the history of the 
Potomac army, was such an exhibition made of official incapacity or personal cowardice. ... At the 
Mine two division commanders were hiding in bomb-proofs, while their troops wandered aimlessly from 
lack of direction or halted in front of obstacles which a single manly effort would have overcome. This 
unhappy day cost the Union army 4,000 men." (Walker's 2d Army Corps, pp. 567-568.) Maj. J. H. 
Powell, U. S. A., who was one of General Ledlie's staff at the Crater, says that he and all of them remained 
" during the entire engagement in or near a bomb-proof within the Union lines." (Century War Book, IV, 
550.) " This talk and these orders, coming from a commander sitting in a bomb-proof inside the Union 
lines, was disgusting." (The same, p. 556.) " With the notable exception of Gen. Robert B. Potter," — 
a Massachusetts man,— "there was not a division commander in the crater or connecting lines, nor was 
there a corps 'commander on the immediate scene of action." (The same, p. 560.) Two other very 
graphic descriptions of the scene may be found in the same volume. 



126 NARRATIVE. 



The Massachusetts troops actually involved in the attack were the 11th, 
21st, 29th, 35th, 40th, 56th, 57th, 58th and 59th Infantry and the 5th Bat- 
tery. Of these, the 59th suffered most in prisoners and the 57th in killed ; 
but none of these sustained such heavy losses as fell upon some of the 
newly levied colored "regiments of Ferrero's Division. Among the killed 
were Lieut. S. G. Berry (35th Mass.), Capts. George H. Howe and E. T. 
Dresser (57th Mass.), Lieut. Clement Granet (58th Mass.). Gen. W. F. 
Bartlett was again struck by a shot and was captured, but it proved to 
be only his wooden leg that was shattered, although this was not at first 
discovered by the sjnnpathizing soldiers who undertook to bear him away. 

In the third battle of Deep Bottom, Ya. (Aug. 14-18, 1864), the 
attacking brigade was led in the most gallant manner by Col. George N. 
Macy of the 20th Mass., who had returned that day from his Wilderness 
wounds, and had here two horses shot under him, being severely injured 
by the falling of one of these. 1 There was heavy skirmishing and some 
alternate success and defeat. General Miles of Massachusetts finally suc- 
ceeded General Barlow, who had never recovered from his terrible wounds 
at Antietam and Gettysburg, and had to resign the command of his divi- 
sion on the 18th, though he attempted a few days later, unsuccessfully, to 
resume it, and had to be carried from the field on a stretcher. 2 

At Deep Bottom the Confederates remained in possession of the field. 
The Massachusetts regiments sustaining casualties at this battle were 
the 11th, 19th, 20th, 24th, 28th Infantry, the 1st Cavalry and the 1st 
Heavy Artillery. Of these, the 24th lost most heavily (31 killed or 
mortally wounded). Among the officers killed were Maj. H. L. Patten 3 
(20th Mass.), Capt. Patrick Nolan (28th Mass.), Lieuts. William Thorne 
and Jesse S. Williams (24th Mass.). 



1 Walker's 2d Corps, p. 573. Colonel Macy had also lost a hand at Gettysburg. General Barlow says 
in bis report : " None of the troops that came under my eye that day behaved with their usual vigor and 
gallantry under fire. Had they done so, the almost undefended line of rifle-pits might easily have been 
carried. I desire, however, to' commend the great gallantry and good behavior of Colonel Macy. . . . He 
did everything that a brave man and a soldier could do." (Official War Records, 87, p 248.) 

2 This distinguished officer has often been claimed as a Massachusetts man, and certainly came very 
near being such. His mother was born in Massachusetts and had chiefly resided there, even after her 
marriage, though not just at the time of his birth ; and the son had been almost wholly educated there. 

3 Major Patten had been previously wounded at Nelson's Farm, Va., and twice at Gettysburg. He 
was brevetted lieutenant-colonel, colonel and brigadier-general some months after death. (See his memoir 
in Harvard Memorial Biographies, I, 443.) Good reports of the share of the 24th Mass. by Col. F. A. 
Osborn and Capt G. W. Gardner will be found in Official War Records, 87, pp. 754-57. A general report 
by Colonel Pickett (25th Mass ) will be found at p. 809. 



THE FINAL CAMPAIGN IN VIRGINIA. 127 



In the attack on the Weldon Eailroad, below Petersburg, under General 
"Warren (August 18-21), the Massachusetts troops engaged were the 18th, 
21st, 29th, 32d, 35th, 36th, 39th, 56th, 57th and 59th Infantry, the 1st 
Cavalry and the 3d, 5th, 9th and 11th batteries, almost all incurring small 
losses and the 39th suffering especially with 17 killed or mortally wounded 
and 246 missing, mostly prisoners. Lieutenant-Colonel Peirson was 
severely wounded, leaving Capt. F. R. Kinsley in command of the 39th, 
who was himself made prisoner a day or two later. Lieut. Wm. T. 
Spear was mortally wounded. Lieut. Horace M. Warren, adjutant of the 
59th, was also killed, with Capt. J. W. Ingell (15th Mass.) and Lieuts. 
Robert T. Bourne (22d Mass.) and A. J. White (35th Mass.). 1 A small 
battalion of recruits and re-enlisted men, formerly belonging to the 18th 
Mass., captured 50 prisoners and a flag. 

At Summit Point, Va., the 37th Mass. Infantry had a picket skirmish 
with some loss (August 21), and at Reams' Station (August 23-25) the 
28th Infantry and the 10th Battery lost some lives and the latter 19 
prisoners. Prisoners were also taken from the 19th and 20th Infantry. 

At Poplar Spring Church or Peebles' Farm (September 30-October 1) 
the small remaining band of the 18th Mass. again did itself credit, its cap- 
tain, Luther S. Bent of Quincy, commanding the skirmish line and being 
brevetted as major " for gallant and distinguished services at the battle of 
Peebles' Farm." The 35th Mass. had the largest number of killed and 
mortally wounded at this battle, besides 156 taken prisoners. The 11th, 
21st, 29th, 32d, 36th, 56th, 57th, 58th and 59th also had casualties. 
Among the lulled were Capts. C. H. Johnson (58th Mass.) and O. S. Samp- 
son (21st), and Lieut. J. W. Fiske (58th Mass.). At Arthur's Swamp, 
Va., on the same day, the 1st Mass. Cavalry had a skirmish; as had the 
40th Mass. at Chapin's Farm, where Lieut. J. A. Fitch was killed (Novem- 
ber 30) ; and also the 1st Heavy Artillery at Yellow Tavern (October 1-5) ; 
the 24th Infantry and 4th Cavalry at Darbytown Roads (October 7 and 
again October 13) ; while the 57th made a reconnoissance to Boydtown 
Plank Road (October 8) ; all with small losses. 

At Hatcher's Run, Va. (Oct. 27, 1864), in connection with the Boyd- 
town Plank Road movement, took place a contest in which the action of the 



1 Captain Ingell, " a brave and valuable officer," who was at the time suffering from a previous wound. 
(Official Army Records, 87, p. 357.) 



128 NARRATIVE. 



10th Mass. Battery (Lieutenant Granger) was, according to the historian 
of the 2d Army Corps, " unusually spirited ; " a and it lost its commanding 
officer, Lieut. H. H. Granger; Lieut. Asa Smith, U. S. A. (4th U. S. 
Artillery), who was detailed to take his place, also fell. Capts. D. A. 
Granger and Alexander McTavish, both of the 11th Mass. Infantry, were 
also killed. The 11th was also actively engaged (November 5) in repel- 
ling an attack on the picket line, and was warmly praised by Col. R. 
MacAllister, commanding brigade, who especially complimented its adju- 
tant, Lieut. Michael Boucher. 2 The 19th, 20th, 57th, 59th Infantry, 1st 
Cavalry (at Dinwiddie Court House) and 11th Battery were also engaged, 
but with small losses. The 32d, 35th and 36th Infantry and the 5th and 9th 
batteries were also present, but not seriously engaged. 

On the Weldon Railroad expedition of December 7 and 11 the Massa- 
chusetts regiments engaged (but without loss) were the 11th, 32d, 39th In- 
fantry, the 1st Heavy Artillery and the 5th and 11th batteries ; while the 
1st Cavalry lost one man at Three Creeks. 

At Dabney's Mills (Hatcher's Run), Feb. 5-7, 1865, the 10th Mass. 
Battery also distinguished itself, repelling three Confederate charges within 
an hour, and firing nearly three hundred rounds, but without casualty be- 
yond the loss of three horses. The 11th, 19th, 20th, 32d Infantry lost 
men, though not largely, the 37th having several wounded. Lieut. W. H. 
Tibbetts (19th Mass.) fell at this time. 

At the daring assault of the Confederates under Lieutenant-General 
Gordon on Fort Stedman (March 25, 1865), capturing the fort by surpx'ise 
almost without a struggle, but being driven out again, several Massachu- 
setts regiments were involved, the 29th and 57th Infantry suffering most, 
but the 14th Battery somewhat, especially in -prisoners, many prisoners 
being, however, taken on the Union side, though General McLaughlen, 
brigade commander, was among those captured by the Confederates. 
Lieut. E. B. Nye (14th Mass. Battery) was killed after refusing to sur- 
render; and Maj. James Doherty and Lieut. A. M. Murdock (57th Mass.), 
with Lieut. Nathaniel Bumpus (29th Mass.), were also killed. The 29th 
Mass. was peculiarly fortunate in receiving medals of honor for this affair. 



1 Walker, p. 623. Three years after his death Lieutenant Granger was brevetted captain, major and 
lieutenant-colonel U. S. Vols, in recognition of his "gallant and meritorious services in this battle." 
a Official Army Records, 87, pp. 398, 400. 



THE FINAL CAMPAIGN IN VIRGINIA. 129 

Maj. J. M. Deane received one " for most distinguished gallantry in action 
at Fort Stedman, in serving with other volunteers a gun previously silenced 
and abandoned, mounted on barbette at Fort Haskell, being exposed to a 
galling fire from the enemy's sharpshooters." Sergeant William H. Howe, 
Co. K, received a medal of honor "for distinguished gallantry" in this 
action, and Color Sergeant Conrad Homan (Co. A) of the same regiment 
had previously received one ' ' for fighting his way through the enemy's 
lines with regimental colors near Petersburg, Va., July 30, 1864," as had 
Private J. H. Harbourne (Co. K) for the capture of a flag, and Private 
Richard Welch (37th Mass.), also for the capture of a flag, a few days 
later, and Private Chas. A. Taggart (37th Mass.) for the same. 

The 28th Mass. Infantry and the 1st Heavy Artillery met with losses, 
which in the former case were considerable, at Duncan's Run (March 25), 
and the 32d and 34th Infantry with the 1st Heavy Artillery had small losses 
on the Boydtown Road (March 29-31), as had the 39th at Gravelly Run 
(March 29). At Dinwiddie Court House (March 29-31) and at Five 
Forks (April 1) the 2d Mass. Cavalry took an honorable part, as did — at 
the latter engagement — the 32d and 39th Mass. Infantry. Such was also 
the case with the 28th and 39th at the South Side Railroad, near Petersburg. 

In the final capture of Petersburg, Va. (April 2, 1865), several Massa- 
chusetts regiments were engaged with losses, — the 19th, 34th, 35th, 36th, 
37th, 46th, 58th and 61st Infantry, the 1st Heavy Artillery and the 5th 
Battery. The 20th and 57th Infantry and the 9th, 10th and 14th were also 
engaged, but without loss. The most conspicuous part was perhaps that 
taken by the 61st Infantry (Colonel Walcott), the very last regiment to 
leave the State, serving primarily as an engineer regiment, and now in 
its first battle. The Confederates having lost and retaken Fort Mahone, 
the 61st carried it, as far as the parapet, and, holding on till after dark, its 
skirmishers then discovered the main fort to be abandoned, as also were 
Petersburg and Richmond the next day. The 61st lost 7 killed and mor- 
tally wounded, among whom was Lieut. Thomas B. Hart. Lieut. Lewis 
Munger (2d Mass. Cavalry) was killed a day or two previous, as was Lieut. 
Samuel Storrow (2d Infantry) at Black Creek, N. C, on March 16, 1865. 

In the subsequent race for final victory between the winning army 
and that already practically defeated, the Massachusetts troops took their 
full share. At Fort Blakeley (April 2-9) the 31st Infantry and the 2d, 



130 NARRATIVE. 



4th, 7th and 15th batteries were engaged, with a loss of one man in the 7th. 
At Sailor's Creek (April 6) the 37th Infantry lost considerably, but the 
19th, 20th and 28th Infantry, the 2d Cavalry and the 1st Heavy Artillery 
escaped without loss of life. At High Bridge (April 6) the 10th Battery 
had no loss, but the 4th Cavalry (Col. Francis Washburn), with a force of 
only 12 officers and 67 men, was surrounded by the Confederate cavalry, 
under Generals Rosser and Fitzhugh Lee, and, after once cutting their way 
through, returned to the defence of two infantry regiments which had 
accompanied them. Gen. Theodore Reed, commanding the expedition, 
was killed, and Colonel Washburn mortally wounded, Capts. W. T. 
Hodges and John D. ^. Goddard, with First Lieut. George F. Davis, 
being also killed, and most of the men killed, wounded or captured. 
The results of the contest were, however, of great importance in checking 
the Confederates and leading to Lee's final surrender. Meanwhile, on 
April 3, Cos. E and H, 1st Mass. Cavalry, under Maj. A. H. Stevens, 
Jr., were the first troops to enter Richmond on the day of its evacuation ; 
Major Stevens having received the surrender of the city and personally 
hoisting the guidons of his squadron over the State House. 1 

On April 6, at Rice's Station, the 34th Infantry had its last man killed 
(out of many), and at Farmville (April 7, 8) the 19th, 20th and 28th 

* 

Infantry, the 1st Heavy Artillery and the 10th Battery were present, but 
without losses on the field, though Capt. Isaac H. Boyd (19th Mass.) died 
of wounds received there. This was for Massachusetts troops the last 
battle of the great Virginia campaign. On April 9 came the surrender at 
Appomattox. 

In the first attack on Fort Fisher (Dec. 25, 1864) Massachusetts can 
hardly be said to have taken part, and at the second attack (Jan. 15, 
1865) no Massachusetts troops can be said to have participated. It was in 
itself, however, an afiair of great importance, this being the largest and 
strongest earthwork constructed by the Confederacy, and absolutely essen- 
tial to it at last, through the protection given to Wilmington, the chief 
blockade-running port. 2 Much blame has been cast upon a Massachusetts 

1 See letter of Col. L. L. Langdon, U. S. A., Century Magazine, June, 1890, p. 309; also in Crownin- 
shield's 1st Mass Cavalry, p. 472. 

2 "Its capture . . . effectually ended all blockade running. Lee sent me word that Fort Fisher 
must.be held or he could not subsist his army." (Narrative of Col. Wm, Lamb in Century War 
Book, IV. 642.) 



MASSACHUSETTS ENLISTMENTS AND CASUALTIES. 131 

commander, Maj.-Gen. B. F. Butler, for his decision that the fort was 
impregnable ; but we have the authoritative opinion of the Confederate 
commander, Col. Wm. Lamb, that this decision was absolutely necessary, 
and that the reason of the success of Maj.-Gen. A. H. Terry's second 
attack lay in the much more formidable character of the naval bombard- 
ment which preceded it, from seventy-five vessels instead of forty-one. 
Colonel Lamb emphatically said that ' ' Admiral Porter was as much to 
blame as General Butler for the repulse." 1 The second and successful 
attack is vividly described by a Massachusetts officer, Capt. (now admiral) 
T. O. Selfridge, Jr., in the Century War Book, and it was one in which 
Massachusetts naval officers and sailors took an active part. "For the 
first time in the history of sieges," says Colonel Lamb, " the land defences 
of the works were destroyed, not by any act of the besieging army, but by 
the concentrated fire, direct and enfilading, of an immense fleet poured 
upon them without intermission, until torpedo wires were cut, palisades 
breached so that they actually afforded cover for assailants, and the slopes 
of the work were rendered practicable for assault." 2 

XXY. MASSACHUSETTS ENLISTMENTS AND CASUALTIES. 

It is almost needless to point out that this preliminary narrative is in 
no sense a history of the Civil War, but merely a general sketch of the 
part taken in it by Massachusetts. The writer has, so far as possible, 
resisted the temptation to discuss the general management of military 
affairs, the success or failure of campaigns or even of particular battles, 
except so far as it bore on the Massachusetts contingent. His effort has 
been to treat all troops of this State as if they were one body of soldiers, 
included in the Union Army, but necessarily distributed on various ser- 
vices. This has of course been less easy than in dealing with a State like 

1 Century War Book, IV, 646. Colonel Lamb repeated this statement to the writer even more emphati- 
cally, at Saratoga, in September, 1895, and also emphasized the assertion made in the above narrative, 
namely, that General Butler had himself to blame for this unjust reproach, oil account of an unduly boast- 
ful and premature letter sent by him to Admiral Porter, which Lamb calls "a piece of romance." Com- 
pare Gordon's War Diary, pp.366, 370, which gives a graphic account, but which is undoubtedly unjust to 
General Butler. For some of the criticisms of naval men, see Ammen's The Old Navy and the New, p. 
405 For General Sherman's remark that General Butler "crawfished off," see Cowley's Leaves from a 
Lawyer's Journal, p. 150. The stigma was unjust, according to Colonel Lamb's testimony. For many 
documents, see Official AVar Records, 87, pp. 963-1026. The latest English naval critic, after careful 
review of the dispute, says " It must be doubtful whether an assault would have succeeded at this date." 
Wilson's Ironclads in Action, I, 140. 2 Century War Book, IV, 654. 



132 NAKRATIVE. 



Vermont, where the regiments were not only fewer, but more generally 
brigaded together ; and it has precluded a perfectly continuous narrative, 
because it has been necessary to follow the varying lines of several 
simultaneous campaigns. It has not been attempted to give the sepa- 
rate regimental histories, except in a highly condensed form, and 
this partly because it has already been so well done in a general 
way, in Bowen's valuable Massachusetts in the War, that it seemed 
better to approach the whole matter from the collective, not the regi- 
mental, point of view. The story is told, in short, as if it were that 
of a single army corps, organically united, but constantly distributed 
over different localities. 

Less than half of the Massachusetts regiments have had their histories 
even ostensibly written. Some of these histories were of the most sketchy 
character, published too soon after the war to have any value except as 
they might contain scattered facts or graphic isolated descriptions. In 
many cases the chapter given to some particular regiment in Bowen's Mas- 
sachusetts in the War is of far more historical value than the book osten- 
sibly devoted to it. As a rule, the most recent histories, as Crowninshield's 
1st Cavalry and Ernilio's 54th Infantry, are altogether the best; and it is 
probable that the present State law, which provides for a certain established 
standard in such histories, will give us much better average work hereafter. 
No Massachusetts regimental history is on the whole so good as the best 
corps histories ; those especially of the 2d Army Corps by Gen. F. A. 
Walker and of the 19th Corps by Irwin. The chief and unique value of 
even the poorest regimental history or company narrative lies in the flavor 
of actual experience there exhibited ; and in this the simple autobiography 
or company diary is apt to surpass the more formal regimental record. 
The best book which the author has had occasion to consult in this respect 
is Lincoln's Life with the 34th Massachusetts Infantry in the War of the 
Eebellion (Worcester, 1879), a book making no claim to high finish or 
especial literary merit, but thoroughly admirable in its way. With these 
may be classed, so far as they go, the manuscript narratives and memo- 
randa of Brevet Maj. E. W. Everson, U. S. Vols., some of which have 
become the property of the State, and which should at some time be 
printed. It was at one time the hope of the author to obtain a good 



MASSACHUSETTS ENLISTMENTS AND CASUALTIES. 133 

deal of such manuscript material, but in this he has had only a limited 
success. 1 

It has been attempted to deal as much as possible with facts and as 
little with eulogy, except as this is quoted from commanding officers, such 
eulogies being, properly speaking, a part of the facts. The total credit 
of Massachusetts, as a single State, lies, if anywhere, in the claim (1) 
that she was very promptly in the field; (2) that there was a certain 
high average standard in her regiments; (3) that they never even once 
conspicuously disgraced themselves ; (4) that she yielded soldiers and 
sailors not merely up to her quota but considerably beyond it ; (5) that 
she had a governor who appreciated the situation ; (6) that, while she did 
not produce a single professional soldier of the very highest rank, 2 she 
produced a series of young men, before untried, — of whom Lowell, 
Bartlett and Miles were perhaps the most striking instances, — who 
exhibited, by admission of all, not merely the most daring courage but 
a certain genius for war. Thus far we are on safe ground ; it will hardly 
be denied that all this may be claimed for Massachusetts. 

As to numbers, the (State) Adjutant-General's report for January, 
1866, 3 claims the total number of men supplied to be 159,165, including 
26,163 in the navy. This estimate includes re-enlisted veterans, who may 
not be included in the U. S. report. The final report from the Adjutant- 
General's office at Washington on the statistics of the war (1885) reports 
from Massachusetts 122,781 white troops, 3,966 colored troops and 19,983 
sailors, making in all 146,730 men, of whom 13,942 died in the war. The 
only States surpassing Massachusetts in total number were New York, 
Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois and Indiana ; the same proportion existing in 
the number of deaths, with the addition that Michigan also slightly ex- 
ceeded Massachusetts in the proportion of these. 

1 He has, however, obtained possession, by gift or purchase, of the following original manuscripts, 
which will be preserved as the property of the Commonwealth : 1. 15th Mass. Infantry. Diary of 
Sergt. S. W. Armington [in field and in prison] (purchased). 2. 18th Mass. Infantry. Lieut, and 
Brevet Maj.Erastus W. Everson. Manuscript list of casualties in Massachusetts regiments; also two 
volumes of personal reminiscence (purchase and gift). 3. 20th Mass. Infantry. One volume of letters 
and other historical material relating especially to Cos. B, etc , from the estate of S. R. Urbino, Esq., of 
Newtonville (gift) . 4. 53d Mass. Infantry. A large scrap-book, with a great variety of historical mate- 
rial (purchased) It is eminently desirable that the Commonwealth should ultimately become the possessor 
of as many as possible of these papers, including the records of the various regimental associations. 

3 See Walker's 2d Army Corps (p. 129) for an admirable delineation and comparison of two of the 
ablest general officers whom Massachusetts contributed, — Sumner and Couch. 3 P. 16. 



134 NARRATIVE. 



The tables in the successive reports of the State Adjutant-General show 
that ever}^ city and town in the State filled its quota upon every call made 
by the President, and that, except in twelve small towns, each city and 
town furnished a surplus over all demands, amounting in the aggregate to 
15,178.* This number has since been considerably increased by the addi- 
tion of sailors finally credited to Massachusetts, the whole number of whom 
now exceeds 30,000 ; and it does not include five companies furnished for 
the New York Mozart Regiment and some 600 men of the 99th New York 
(recruited by Colonel Wardrop, formerly of the 3d Mass.), who did not 
form a part of the Massachusetts quota. Every colored man recruited out 
of the State and every German brought from Germany might be deducted, 
and leave a large balance in favor of Massachusetts. There is, however, 
no reason why they should be deducted, since it was plainly the duty of 
every State to seek recruits from beyond its borders for the aid of the 
republic, so long as it did not substitute them for its own citizens. The 
total amount of bounty paid to all recruits by the State, up to Dec. 1, 1865, 
was $11, 685,987. 60. 2 

The only important instance of the incorporation into Massachusetts 
regiments of whole companies raised out of the State was as follows : after 
the formation of the 2d Cavalry had been determined on, an offer was 
received from California to raise a company there, to be counted on the 
quota of Boston. A company was accordingly thus organized on Dec. 
10, 1862, at San Francisco, and reached Camp Meigs at Readville, Jan. 3, 
1863, under command of Capt. J. Sewell Read of San Francisco, — after- 
ward killed in service, — the second lieutenant being also from that city 
and the first lieutenant from Boston. Afterwards a whole battalion was 
enlisted in California, reaching Boston April 16, 1863, and consisting of 
four companies (E, F, L and M). Of these, the first three were com- 
manded wholly by California line officers, while the last had a second lieu- 
tenant from Massachusetts. The men were natives of almost every State 
in the Union, enlisted with no Massachusetts bounty. 

Some account of the colored troops enlisted by Massachusetts has been 
previously given, there being in addition a regiment of cavalry (the 5th 
Mass. Cavalry) composed of colored men, under white officers, and having 

1 Adjutant-General's Report (January, 1866), pp. 15, 17, 23. Compare Bowen, p. 82. 

2 Mass. Adjutant-General's Report, p. 25. 



MASSACHUSETTS ENLISTMENTS AND CASUALTIES. 135 

a respectable and useful career, though less conspicuous than that of the 
54th and 55th Mass. Infantry. As to German soldiers, Mr. J. G. Rosen- 
garten, in his The German Soldier in the Wars of the United States, esti- 
mates the total number recruited in this State as 1,876, the total German 
population of the State, by the census of 1860, being 9J961. 1 This state- 
ment is based on the calculations made by Dr. B. A. Gould for the San- 
itary Commission. These soldiers were doubtless widely scattered through 
the regiments, 2 but there were three especially German companies, and it 
is greatly to be regretted that the special history of these three has never 
been written. The late Mr. S. R. Urbino of Newtonville, who took a 
larger share than any one else in recruiting them, had offered to prepare a 
sketch for this narrative, but was prevented by death from fulfilling his 
purpose, and, though his papers relating to the subject have been placed 
in my hands, they are very scanty and fragmentary. The first two 
companies were formed in and near Boston, perhaps with some recruits 
brought from Germany. The company officers were, at first, German 
by birth or origin, except Lieut. J. W. LeBarnes, who was well known 
and popular among the German citizens of Boston, and had formed a 
German company for the defence of Wendell Phillips during the anti- 
slavery troubles just previous to the war. 

The companies (B and C of the 20th) were unfortunate in the loss of 
officers, Captain Babo and Lieutenant Wesselhoeft having been drowned at 
Ball's Bluff and Captain Dreher being severely wounded there and mortally 
at Fredericksburg. They were also in one respect peculiarly situated, 
forming a part of a regiment which, although fine in material and disci- 
pline and eminent in service, was for a time somewhat divided by what 
General Devens criticised as "the blue-blood theory" of promotion, and 
still more by the inclination of some of its very best officers to return 
fugitive slaves, under the wish and even orders of Gen. C. P. Stone. It 
is needless to say that the German companies were by no means on the con- 
servative side on either question, and it is evident, from the correspondence 
in my hands, that some chafing grew out of this fact. It even appears that 
when General Stone was finally arrested for treason and imprisoned, one 



1 Rosengarten, p. 195. 

2 There were, for instance, many German recruits sent out to the 1st Mass. Cavalry. See Crownin- 
shield's history of that regiment, p. 248. 



136 NARRATIVE. 



of the German companies fell into line spontaneously and gave three cheers. 
It is well enough to know that, in spite of this possible breach of orderly 
discipline, the offending company received high praise from Capt. (after- 
wards general) G. N. Macy, whose good opinion was certainly of value, 
and who wrote (June 14, 1862), " I am very [glad] to say that the com- 
pany behaved splendidly [at Fair Oaks] and did nobly but with one 
exception." This testimony is the more valuable as this officer had been 
promoted some months before to the captaincy (of Co. B) over the heads 
of its two original lieutenants, a thing which, even where necessary, rarely 
promotes harmony or even good discipline. The third German company, 
in the 25th Mass. Infantry, had German officers, and maintained its char- 
acter well. 1 Desertions from these three companies were but few ; indeed, 
the whole number recorded against the whole 25th Regiment was but 
thirteen, none of these being to the enemy. 2 

There were Irish companies in several regiments, as, for instance, four 
in the 48th Infantry, one in the 25th, and so on, but the men of this descent 
were mainly concentrated into two distinctively Irish regiments, — the 9th 
and the 28th. Of the first Irish regiment, the 9th, Adjutant-General 
Schouler wrote in January, 1862 : " This regiment is one of the best the 
Commonwealth has sent to the field. It is composed almost entirely of men 
of Irish birth and their immediate descendants." 3 As a rule, they showed 
the fighting characteristics of their race and sometimes the turbulent quali- 
ties. As for desertion, the regiments which suffered most from it were not 
the distinctively Irish regiments, although they suffered a good deal. 

In June and July, 1863, the United States law in regard to drafting was 
put in force in Massachusetts under Major Clark, U. S.,A«> provost marshal 
general. All male persons in the State between twenty and forty-five years 
of age were enrolled, in two classes (107, 386+56, 792 = 164, 178 in all). 
The number actually drafted was 32,079, of whom 6,690 were held to serve. 
Of these, 743 actually entered the service, 2,345 were represented by sub- 

1 For this company at New Berne, N. C, see Putnam's Co. A, 25th Mass., p. 165. 

2 Mass. Adjutant-General's Report (January, 1865), pp. 612, 672. 

3 The first Irish company volunteering in the State was the Emmett Guards of Worcester, Mass. 
(Schouler, I, 107). For the proportion of foreigners in our army at large, see Comte de Paris (transla- 
tion), I, 182. For the cordiality with which the green flag was received on the battle-field, see Comte de 
Paris (translation), I, 178; Walker's 2d Army Corps, p. 62. The green flag of the 9th Mass. was 
presented by the Irish citizens of Boston at the State House, April 24, after Governor Andrew had 
presented the national and State flags; and that of the 29th by New York regiments Mass. Adjutant- 
General's Reports (January, 1864), p. 313. Compare Macnamara's Irish Ninth, pp. 52", 68, 79, etc. 



MASSACHUSETTS ENLISTMENTS AND CASUALTIES. 137 

stitutes, 22,343 were exempted from physical defect or other cause, 3,044 
failed to report, and 3,623 paid commutation, amounting to $1,08 5,800.* 

The subject of cowardice and desertion is one upon which it is useless 
to enter in detail, because one soon finds that, the whole subject being 
naturally" vexatious, commanding officers have usually avoided it, and 
accurate details are unattainable. The Massachusetts commander who 
faced it most fully appears to have been Col. N. B. McLaughlen of the 
1st Infantry, who in his final report gave a list (not printed) of nine 
commissioned officers and thirteen men who had disgraced their State 
by cowardice. 2 Even this list may have been untrustworthy, since all 
experience shows that a man may at first shirk, and yet turn out brave 
at the end. 3 It has never been charged on any Massachusetts regiment 
that it showed cowardice collectively, although there were instances 
during the Civil War where whole bodies of troops turned their backs 
at the first engagement. 4 

In respect to desertions, General McLaughlen reports a desertion of 
160 in the 1st Mass. Infantry, out of a total of about ten times that 
number. Ten per cent, of desertion is a large figure ; but that in other 
regiments was much larger, usually occurring late in the war, when a 
class of men called bounty jumpers grew up, who enlisted expressly 
with a view to this. Bo wen, in his Massachusetts in the Civil War, 
gives the following figures as to desertion, 5 the ten worst regiments, 
in this respect, being graded as follows : 2d Cavalry, 614 desertions; 
3d Heavy Artillery, 381 desertions; 11th Infantry, 320 desertions; 3d 
Cavalry, 289 desertions ; 28th Infantry, 279 desertions ; 2d Infantry, 276 
desertions; 4th Cavalry, 261 desertions; 9th Infantry, 236 desertions; 
20th Infantry, 226 desertions ; 47th Infantry, 225 desertions. The larger 
proportion of desertions in the cavalry regiments was due partly to the 
fact of their often scattered life at outposts and headquarters ; partly to 



1 The number of drafted men and substitutes actually mustered into service during 1863 was as follows : 
9th, 200; 11th, 201 ; 12th, 322; 13th, 200; 15th, 202;'l6th, 202; 18th, 302; 19th, 211 ; 20th, 201 ; 22d, 194; 
28th, 200 ; 32d, 312 ; 54th, 73 ; provost guard, 224. Total, 2,944. (Mass. Adjutant General's Report, 
January, 1864, p. 27.) As to "the curse of conscription," see AValker's 2d Army Corps, p. 11. In 
Massachusetts, as this exhibit shows, the curse was reduced to a minimum. 

3 Mass. Adjutant-General's Report (January, 1865), p. 195. 

3 The writer knows of a regiment — not from Massachusetts — in which the only officer who distinctly 
showed the white feather, when under fire for the first time, was also the only one who afterwards selected 
the army as a profession, remaining in it with credit to this day. 

« Compare Walker, 2d Army Corps, p. 229. 6 Bowen, p. 872. 



138 NARRATIVE. 



the facilities given by their being mounted ; and most of all to the fact 
that many of their recruits were received in the later period of the war, 
when bounty jumping had become almost a profession. 

The 13th Light Battery appears to have lost by desertion more than 
one-quarter of its whole membership. It is probable that comparatively 
few of these deserters actually went over to the enemy, although a 
former member of the 2d Mass. Cavalry was caught and shot by court- 
martial for leading a party against his former associates. An officer in 
the 12th Mass. was cashiered for treason. As to colored regiments, 
Emilio reports but 36 desertions in the 54th Mass., out of a total 
membership of 1,354, and nearly half of these were from camp at Read- 
ville, before departure to the front. 1 

When we come to the casualties of the war, and follow Fox's compu- 
tations, which are recognized as the most careful yet made, there are in 
all 45 infantry regiments which lost over 200 men each, killed or mor- 
tally wounded during the Civil War. Six of these were Massachusetts 
regiments. At the head of all regiments stands the 5th New Hampshire, 
with a loss of 295 ; 2 then follow in succession the 83d Pennsylvania, the 
7th Wisconsin, the 5th Michigan and the 20th Mass., the latter thus 
ranking fifth on the list, with a loss of 260. 3 There follow later the 
28th (loss 250), the 15th (loss 241), the 22d (loss 216), the 9th (loss 
209), the 57th (loss 201). It will be noticed that two of these six (the 
9th and 28th) were the only distinctively Irish- American regiments. 

Of heavy artillery regiments, losing each 200 killed or died of wounds, 
there were nine, the 1st Mass. (Colonel Greene) ranking fifth among 
these, with a loss of 241. Nine cavalry regiments had the same record, 
neither of which was from Massachusetts, although the 1st Cavalry 
ranked high. • The batteries were much smaller organizations ; there 

1 For facts as to desertion, see Mass. Adjutant-General's Report (January, 1864), p. 928, (January, 
1865), pp. 195, 953 ; Bowen's Massachusetts in the Civil War, pp 131, 760, 848, 851 ; Official War Records, 
65, 725; Crowninshield's 1st Mass. Cavalry, p. 447; Cook's 12th Mass. Infantry, pp. 12, 142; Walcott's 
21st Mass Infantry, p. 222; Emilio's 54th Mass. Infantry, p. 391; Billings's Hard Tack and Coffee, 
pp. 157, 161. The whole number of military executions during the war was 121. (Billings, p. 163.) 

2 Fox's Regimental Losses in the Civil War, p. 3 Compare Walker's 2d Army Corps, pp. 190, 311. 

3 It is not strange, in view of this pre-eminence, that the 20th should be one of the two regiments 
especially commemorated on the stairway of the Boston Public Library. In regard to the other (the 2d), 
it must be remembered that, on Hooker's reorganization of the Army of the Potomac, he selected on in- 
spection, out of one hundred and fifty regiments, only eleven from the whole army as worthy of com- 
mendation, the 1st, 2d and 20th Mass. being three of these. As a matter of fact, however, the 2d and 20th 
were commemorated in the Public Library simply because tbey were the only ones whose friends pro- 
vided the means for such distinction. It was not done at the city's expense. 



MASSACHUSETTS ENLISTMENTS AND CASUALTIES. 139 

were in the whole army 14 batteries losing each 15 or more, of which 
the 5th Mass. Battery (Captain Phillips) ranked third, losing 19 ; and 
the 9th (Captain Bigelow) twelfth, losing 15. Perhaps, however, the 
truest test of hard fighting is to compare the number of killed and mor- 
tally wounded with the total enrolment. Fox gives a list of 23 full 
regiments (nearly all infantry) losing 15 per cent, or more upon their 
total enrolment. At the head of these stands the 2d Wisconsin, with 
19.7 per cent. ; third in rank comes the 57th Mass. Infantry, with 19.1 
per cent. ; and sixteenth comes the 22d Mass. Infantry, with 15.5 per 
cent. All these figures are admitted by the compiler to be in some de- 
gree approximate, as it is often impossible to state with precise accuracy 
the total enlistment of regiments of long service. In the case of the 
57th Mass., for instance, a number of names have been properly excluded 
which were added by consolidation of the 49th at the very close of the 
war. 1 It must always be remembered, however, that, as has already 
been suggested, a high rate of mortality, even in battle, is not always 
and necessarily to the glory of a regiment, since while it may some- 
times proceed from the daring of officers and men, it may sometimes 
come quite as much from carelessness or want of discipline. Yet on 
the whole the record of lives lost will always be popularly accepted 
as the test of distinguished service. On the same principle, it is to 
be noticed that all the monuments and memorials erected for soldiers 
are built to celebrate the dead, not the survivors. 2 

All military historians agree, moreover, that the mere comparison 
of losses is one of the most superficial grounds of comparison between 
military commands. The first duty of an officer is to sacrifice his 
troops where it is necessary ; his second, to guard them against need- 
less sacrifice. His skill and foresight and the discipline and coolness 
of the troops whom he commands will often save them from losses 
which poor officers and insufficient discipline would incur. The losses 
suffered at Bull Run, for instance, were not those of an army but of a 
mob in uniform, as yet undisciplined; or, as Governor Andrew said, 

1 Fox, p. 9. Other Massachusetts percentages above 10 per cent, were as follows: 2d Mass., 14.3; 
15th, 14.01; 28th, 14; 21st and 58th, 13.4 each; 20th,-13.1; 37th, 12.7; 9th and 12th, 12.6 each ; 56th, 12; 
25th, 11.7 ; 16th, 11.2; 10th, 11 ; 34th and 36th, 10.3 each. 

2 The late Dr. J. G. Palfrey, whose two sons had distinguished themselves in the Civil War, but had 
survived it, always pointed out — and with some justice — this omission in the Harvard Memorial Hall. 



140 NARRATIVE. 



of "an aggregation of town meetings." The governor himself wrote, 
on June 4, 1862, to Col. G. H. Gordon, commanding a brigade under 
Major-General Banks: "Permit me, in closing, to congratulate you upon 
your nomination to the rank of brigadier-general, and also upon the 
brilliant success achieved by the withdrawal of our forces, with so little 
loss." 1 

XXVI. MASSACHUSETTS EST THE FIELD. 

The patriot Garibaldi told Gen. W. F. Bartlett that he had seen from 
the beginning that there was only one question pending in the world, and 
that was the American question. 2 It was not the fault of Massachusetts if 
other nations and even our own nation failed at first to recognize the great- 
ness of this question, or the fact that slavery was an essential factor in the 
war. Even some who finally were active in recognizing it, as General 
Butler, held back from it at first, and would gladly have seen the matter 
adjusted without liberating a slave. Col. George D. Wells, one of the 
most brilliant of the younger Massachusetts commanders, advocated this 
policy in his recruiting speeches at Worcester, and yet afterwards became 
a member of a board to examine officers for colored troops. The increas- 
ing tendency to an emancipation policy swept all before it, and carried 
Massachusetts first ; yet the repugnance to this attitude died hard among 
many Massachusetts officers, and unfortunately among some of the best 
of these. 3 

The good sanitary condition of the Massachusetts regiments was ad- 
mitted by many witnesses, the camps being kept in such order, sometimes, 
that when an inspection by a regular officer was announced for a certain day 
not the slightest special preparation was made for that ceremony. 4 The 
early surgical examination of soldiers was often so carelessly conducted as to 
bring many men not properly inspected into the regiments, 5 but after being 
there they were fairly well attended and supervised. 6 The percentage of 

1 Schouler, I, 334. After the Frederick sburg defeat, a New Hampshire colonel gave in his report this 
frank explanation of his regiment's large losses : " Allow me to state that the reason why the loss of my 
regiment was so heavy was, the men held their ground and endeavored to whip the enemy, instead of 
skulking or shamefully leaving the field, as many of the new regiments did." Official War Records, 
XXI, 235. Compare Mil. Hist. Society's Papers, II, 37. 2 Palfrey's Bartlett, p. 185. 

s Lincoln's 34th Mass., p. 100. The author does not mention any actual surrender of slaves to their 
owners by this regiment, but this is attributed to it by Cudworth, in 1st Mass. Regiment, p. 90. Walcott, 
in his 21st Mass. (p. 14), relates an incident of positive refusal to hunt slaves. 

* Lincoln's 34th Mass., p. 71. 

6 It has been urged, however, that these examinations were still less strict at a later day. Billings's 
Hard Tack and Coffee, p. 173. « Lincoln, pp. 18, 19, 34. 



MASSACHUSETTS IN THE FIELD. 141 

deaths from disease in the 13th Mass. Infantry (Col. S. H. Leonard) was 
the smallest among the three-year regiments of the entire army. " There 
were regiments with a smaller number of deaths from disease, but they 
were two-year regiments, or carried a less number of names on their rolls." 
This is the remark of Col. W. F. Fox in his invaluable book, Regimental 
Losses in the Civil War; 1 but when he adds, " The extraordinary exemp- 
tion from disease . . . would indicate that the regiment was composed of 
superior material," he forgets to recognize that it must have been also well 
officered. Nothing is more deceptive among military statistics than the 
mere number of killed in battle ; this may proceed from the superior dar- 
ing of a commander or simply from his carelessness and incapacity ; but a 
small death-roll from disease is pretty sure to be due to the care of the 
commander and the surgeons. The high character of the Massachusetts 
surgeons was generally recognized, from the days of Dr. Luther V. Bell 
onward ; and many instances of their self-devotion have been recorded in 
these pages. 2 It was found easier, however, to secure the aid of first-class 
surgeons at the beginning of the war than at the end ; and it was latterly 
necessary to introduce into the service a good many of what were called 
" contract surgeons," who did not perhaps come quite up to the level of 
their predecessors. In the earlier days great aid was given in the care of 
the Massachusetts regiments by a soldiers' agency, established at Washing- 
ton under the auspices of Col. Gardner W. Tufts of Lynn, this being first 
instituted on the arrival of the 6th Regiment with its wounded, April 19-, 
1861, and afterwards expanding until it included not merely the oversight 
of the Massachusetts men in the sixty hospitals in and near Washington, 
but also in the camps and on the battlefields within reach, including the 
sound as well as the disabled. The names of 36,151 sick or wounded 
soldiers from the State were recorded at the Washington agency, and the 
expense to the Massachusetts treasury was some $3 5, 000 . 3 

The service of the chaplains in the field ought properly to rank next to 
that of the surgeons, but this was not always the case. The whole position 
of the chaplain in our army was not only difficult but anomalous, in this 
respect at least. In a little world ruled by clockwork, where in the ordi- 

1 Fox, p. 471. 

2 See Walcott's 21st Mass. Vols., p. 153, for testimony to this fact; and Cook's 12th Mass., p. 151, for 
the death of a surgeon on the field. 

3 Bowen's Massachusetts in the War, p. 37. For Mrs. Livermore's account of the services of Massa- 
chusetts women in these and other hospitals see (in the present work) II, 586. 



142 NARRATIVE. 



nary camp routine each man had his precise position and every hour its 
prescribed duties, the chaplain alone held a vague and indefinite place, and 
had to fill his own hours and lay out his own plan of work. This left his 
whole sphere of usefulness to be determined by his personal qualities. To 
the man of strength and tact, this freedom was an advantage, and he often 
created for himself a position of vast influence ; but the weak or tactless 
man found himself pushed aside, the mechanism provided no place for him 
such as it created for all others ; he degenerated into the mere postmaster 
of the regiment or the caterer for the officers' mess. It was fortunate if 
actual demoralization did not follow. Sometimes the very spirit of advent- 
ure, having no legitimate channel, led him astray, as with the Massachu- 
setts chaplain of one of the early colored regiments at the South, of whom 
a soldier said, " Woffer Mars' Chapman [chaplain] made a preacher for? 
He's de fightin'est more Yankee I eber see in all my days." This advent- 
urous person, volunteering on a perilous scouting expedition, was captured 
by the enemy and held a prisoner for a year, at a time when non-combatant 
chaplains were promptly exchanged. Apart from such extremes, we often 
come upon hints, in the books of personal reminiscences, of the errors or 
incompetence of individual chaplains. 1 On the other hand, there was no 
limit to the respect and gratitude inspired by some other Massachusetts 
chaplains, as, for instance, Rev. G. S. Ball (21st Infantry) and Rev. J. F. 
Moors (52d Infantry). To these might be added Father Scully (9th In- 
fantry ) , whom Sheridan is said to have pronounced ' ' the pluckiest little 
devil of a chaplain " he ever saw. 

It is a merit of civil war, that, while often bitterer than any other, it 
usually discloses little of the incidental or secondary cruelties of war, — as 
personal outrage or torture, wanton havoc or personal plunder. Of 
plundering there was a good deal at the outset, and there is little doubt 
that there were serious frauds, in some directions, as to the cotton supply ; 
but " loot, " in the sense so familiar in British army life, occurs very little 
as a factor. Where it existed, it was carefully concealed, not proclaimed. 
No American soldier would have bragged of his commander's stolen posses- 
sions, as English soldiers spoke freely, for instance, of Lord Wolseley's. 
An English military writer, speaking of that officer's frequent ill-luck, 
says frankly : "Upon the loot of Lucknow an officer gave him a valuable 

1 See, for instance, Lincoln's 34th Mass. Infantry, pp. 92, 105 ; Putnam's Co. A, 25th Mass., p. 186. 



MASSACHUSETTS IN THE FIELD. 143 

cashmere shawl. It was stolen. The men of his company afterwards pre- 
sented him with two silver bowls. They shared the same fate. 1 " There 
was no American officer of whose career such matters would be so openly 
affirmed. 2 This was certainly a gain. 

Moreover, there were in our Civil War many instances of something 
approaching to chivalry on both sides, as when, in the assault on Port 
Hudson, orders were given by Confederate officers to spare Gen. W. F. 
Bartlett, as the only mounted man visible among the throng of assailants ; 3 
or when the commander of a picket station bade his men present arms to 
General Meade across the river at Richmond, instead of firing upon him, 
when they had him absolutely in their power; or when, on the other side, 
General Kershaw was spared by the Union officers at Fredericksburg when 
he alone dared ride up to reconnoitre the enemy from a knoll which was 
swept by the fire of the sharpshooters of both armies.* 

The gradual development of the Union cavalry, which at first was 
distinctly inferior to the Confederate and in the end overwhelmingly 
superior, 5 while not at all confined to the Massachusetts regiments, yet 
found in them some of its best illustrations, and certainly some of its best 
commanders. This was due largely to the high standard set by Col. 
Robert Williams of the 1st Cavalry and to the distinguished qualities of 
Col. C. R. Lowell of the 2d Cavalry, of whom much has been elsewhere 
said. Colonel Williams brought upon himself some criticism by his severe 
winnowing of the original list of his line officers, — an act of courage to 
which few regimental commanders were equal. The later career of his 

1 Review of Reviews, September, 1890, p. 276. 

2 Foraging under Banks was for a time unchecked (Hosmer's Color-Guard, p. 103). At the outset, 
he allowed pillaging a week, then issued an order prohibiting it (Palfrey's Bartlett, p. 74). For Gen J. 
E. Johnston's view of Sherman's foragers, see Ohio Loyal Legion Sketches, I, 15. For cases of plunder 
among Confederates, see De Leon's Four Years in Rebel Capitals, p. 97. For claim that poison was given 
to Union soldiers, see Eyland's Evolution of a Life, p. 180. For occasional brutality of Union soldiers, 
see Hosmer's The Color-Guard, 155 , 3 Palfrey's Bartlett, p. 83. 

4 Both these last incidents are related by the Rev. Robert Wilson in the Charleston (S. C) News and 
Courier, quoted in the Boston Transcript (July 14, 1896). The Richmond incident was told him by 
Colonel McCoy of Pennsylvania, a member of General Meade's staff, and present on the occasion 
described 

6 In Orowninshield's 1st Mass. Cavalry there is an admirable essay on the development of the Union 
cavahy during the war. As to the superiority of the Confederate cavalry at first, see Gordon's Brook 
Farm to Cedar Mountain, p. 137. the Comte de Paris (translation), I, 276, and Gen. Sheridan's Personal 
Memoirs, 1, 354-355 For the almost annihilated condition of the Confederate cavalry at last, see Sheridan's 
Memoirs, I, 453-455. The latter were often mounted infantry without sabres. (De Leon's Four Years in 
Rebel Capitals, p. 97.) General Sheridan thinks the American use of cavalry more highly developed and 
efficient than the German. (Personal Memoirs, II. 450.) For special references to 1st Mass. Cavalry, see 
Personal Memoirs, I, 350, 364, 374, 376, 406. For his opinion of Lowell, see I, 478, 489, 497 ; II, 26. 



144 NARRATIVE. 



regiment vindicated this, for it did its full share, especially in those 
two important engagements at Brandy Station and Aldie, which, in Sheri- 
dan's phrase, "made the Federal cavalry" 1 and proved it to be hence- 
forward not merely the equal but the superior of the Confederate. The 
Massachusetts field artillery also held its own conspicuously well, though 
always somewhat handicapped by the fact that it was not, like that of some 
other States, allowed to possess a regimental organization, so that the best 
and bravest officers, though often, like Capt. A. P. Martin, having a brigade 
command, could not rise above the linear rank and pay of captain, even if 
brevetted, as in his case, to a brigadier-generalship. 2 During the Red 
River campaign, Col. W. J. Landram (19th Kentucky) wrote of an engage- 
ment at Sabine Cross Roads : " It is proper to say that Captain Nims's 
battery [the 2d Mass.] displayed through the whole fight an example of 
coolness and true courage unsurpassed in the annals of history." 3 

The war was also marked by a great self-education in military meth- 
ods, and the creation of an extremely energetic and efficient veteran force 
out of that aggregation of town meetings of which Governor Andrew 
spoke. The art of entrenching, for instance, which scarcely existed at 
the battle of Shiloh, 4 was brought to such perfection as made it almost a 
matter of instinct with veteran soldiers to entrench themselves wherever 
they halted over night, in the enemy's country. 5 At the outset there were 
curious superstitions or at least rumors among raw recruits as of " masked 
batteries" and a certain " Black Horse Cavalry" which haunted the imag- 
ination and inspired real terror. So thoroughly were these fears removed 
that there was for a long time a disbelief as to the existence of torpedoes 
in the Southern rivers, and some valuable lives were sacrificed through 

1 Crowninshield's 1st Mass. Cavalry, p. 18. 

* For the inferiority, on the whole, of the Confederate field artillery, see Comte de Paris (translation), 
I, 101. Compare United Service Magazine, I, 530. 

8 Official War Records, 61, p. 293. Captain Nims's own report is on p. 462. 

4 General Sherman asserts that there were at this battle " the usual entrenchments " (Personal 
Memoirs, I, 180) ; but this meant, practically, that there were scarcely any. See Century War Book, I, 
481, 487. 

b " That great change in the tactics of the two armies by which it was to become almost impossible to 
get a fair fight anywhere in the open ground; which was to create a system of rapid, effective entrench- 
ment, such as previously had not been dreamed of by soldiers, and had formed no part of the theory of 
military operations ; which was to make the sanguinary struggles of 1864 and 1865 nothing but a series 
of assaults upon fortified lines, the troops covering themselves everywhere, spontaneously and instinc- 
tively, the moment they came into line in front of the enemy " (Walker's 2d Army Corps, p. 386.) As 
to the imitation of these methods in the German army, see Ohio Loyal Legion sketches, I, 325. As to the 
Confederates learning to entrench first, see Eyland's Evolution of a Life, p. 251. 



MASSACHUSETTS IN THE FIELD. 145 

sheer disbelief. The same incredulity extended to those obstructions 
which the Confederates built skilfully on those rivers, and which were 
seldom allowed for or foreseen. 1 

On the other hand, the war developed methods and short cuts impos- 
sible for any regular army, and scarcely to be commended even for an 
unusually intelligent and self-respecting body. A Massachusetts colonel 
told the writer with satisfaction that he for a time, in a region wholly safe, 
entirely discontinued all sentinels round his camp, throwing the men 
entirely on their honor as to absenting themselves, and having a wholly 
empty guard-house as the result. He also told me that on a long march 
he also discontinued the tedious process of laboriously aligning his men 
before letting them rest and then again before taking up the line of march ; 
but permitted them simply to halt for rest at a single command and set off 
again at another. The consequence was, he said, that his men got twice 
as much rest on a march as the other regiments. 2 They never, perhaps, 
like some Confederate regiments, made charges without military formation, 
as at Charles City, or used stones for missiles, as at Groveton; 3 but they 
were often, at the outset, equipped with muskets so poor as to be more 
efficient when clubbed than in any other way. There were among them 
individual instances of cowardice, 4 but this was never, so far as I know, 
attributed to any Massachusetts regiment or battery collectively, or to 
the actual commander of any ; nor were whole companies ever mustered 
out as insubordinate, as happened once in the Confederate army. 5 It may 
fairly be claimed that the Massachusetts regiments were at first censured 
far oftener, among their mates, for showing too much discipline than for 
too little ; and that, as the war came slowly to its height, the value of this 
discipline was more and more conceded by all. That great drawback to 
restraint in volunteer regiments, and especially in rural regiments, the 

1 For these pilings, called " Yankee-catchers " by those who built them, see Aminen's The Old Navy 
and the New, p. 191 ; Ammen's The Navy in the Civil War, pp. 47, 59, 93, 158, 186, 191, 192. The real 
" Black Horse Cavalry "was the 4th Va. Cavalry, Co. H. (Crowrrinshield's 1st Mass. Cavalry, pp. 20, 190.) 

2 See, in Lincoln's 34th Mass., p. 173, a striking bit of original action on the part of the colonel, in 
utter disregard of orders, but finally sustained by the brigade commander. 

3 Johnson's Short History of Secession, pp. 168, 181. 

4 See, for instance, Bosson's 42d Mass. Vols., p. 241; Macnamara's Irish 9th, pp. 125, 213; Walker's 
2d Army Corps, p. 229. The latter, after describing the utter and bewildered terror attributed, perhaps 
unjustly, to some of the German regiments at Chancellorsville, adds : " I never saw an American so 
frightened as to lose his senses, though I have seen thousands of the natives of Columbia leave one 
battlefield or another in the most dastardly manner." 

5 De Leon's Four - Years in Rebel Capitals, p. 133. 



146 NARRATIVE. 



too free-and-easy familiarity between officers and men, diminished as the 
war went on ; and all learned by experience the absolute need of military 
subordination, whatever the relative position of the parties at home. 1 

It is probable that, in a war so prolonged and desperate, the defects in- 
cident to volunteer soldiers were much more than counterbalanced by the 
personal intelligence and endurance of that class. Maj. G. C. Eggleston, 
a Confederate officer, has borne remarkable testimony to this in a paper in 
the Century War Book. He says of Lee's army: "With mercenary 
troops or regulars the resistance that Lee was able to offer to Grant's 
tremendous pressure would have been impossible. . . . The starvation 
and the excessive marching would have destroyed the morale of troops 
held together only by discipline. ... If either side had lacked this 
element of personal heroism on the part of its men, it would have been 
driven from the field long before the spring of 1865." 2 It is the recogni- 
tion of this fact on each side which has rendered possible the mutual good 
feeling that has since arisen between the veterans of the two armies, and 
which has nowhere been more marked than in Massachusetts. After a 
sufficient number of years have passed, it is impossible not to recognize 
with a certain appreciation the fighting qualities of either a victorious or a 
defeated foe. The same fairness extends in time to the mutual criticism 
of leadership. The latest Northern writers, as Ropes and Dodge, both 
Massachusetts men, have sometimes been criticised as being too compli- 
mentary to Lee as compared with Grant ; and Walker, also a Massachu- 
setts man, and a very high authority, has not hesitated to bear witness to 
"that restless activity, unflinching audacity and spontaneous enterprise by 
which the Confederate commanders were so strongly marked, but in which 
many of the most resolute and stubborn fighters in our own army seemed 
lacking." 3 Even he would doubtless recognize, however, that, after the 
organization of Sheridan's cavalry, this comparison lost some of its weight. 
Certainly the soldiers of each army thoroughly outgrew the delusion with 
which each began, that the other army would be easy to conquer. "Do 

1 For illustrations of this familiarity, see Bosson's 42d Mass., p. 223. 

2 Century War Book, IV, 232. In that extremely interesting work, With an Ambulance in the Franco- 
German War, by Dr. Ryan, it is stated that the only thing which demoralizes the German soldier is short 
rations, while this evil is borne by the French soldier with cheerfulness (pp. 170, 171). 

3 Walker's 2d Army Corps, p. 377. 



THE RETURN OF THE FLAGS. 147 

not let us deceive ourselves," said Col. James Montgomery, a veteran 
Kansas guerilla, to the present writer, who had commented on the under- 
sized and underfed men who had once been brought in as prisoners, in 
Florida. " There are no soldiers in the world more formidable," he added, 
"than those whom we have to encounter." Should this reunited nation 
ever be unfortunate enough to be entangled in a foreign war, there will 
be an inestimable value in the mutual respect and confidence which were 
fought out by both North and South upon the battlefield. It is an inade- 
quate compensation for those four years of sorrow, yet it is something. 

XXVII. THE RETURN OF THE FLAGS. 

There occurred in Boston, at the end of the war, a ceremony which 
came the nearest attainable to a general review and reception of the sur- 
viving Massachusetts soldiers. It occurred on Dec. 22, 1865, the two 
hundred and forty-fifth anniversary of the landing of the pilgrims at 
Plymouth. It was called forth by the following orders proceeding from 
Governor Andrew : — 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Headquarters, Boston, Dec. 13, 1865. 
[General Order No. 18.] 

By General Order No. 94 of the War Department, issued May 15, 1865, 
volunteer regiments and batteries, on their return to their respective States, when 
mustered out and discharged, were to deposit their colors with the chief United 
States mustering officers, to be by them transferred to the governors of the States. 

Since that time, the following Massachusetts regiments and batteries, having 
faithfully served their country to the end of the rebellion, returned home and been 
discharged, their colors have been received by Brevet Col. F. N. Clarke, U. S. A., 
chief mustering officer, viz. : 2d, 11th, 17th, 19th, 21st, 23d, 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th, 
29th, 31st, 33d, 34th, 35th, 36th, 37th,(38tk 39th, 40th, 54th, 55th, 56th, 57th, 
58th, 59th, 61st Regiments., of Infantry, 1st Battalion Frontier Cavalry, 3d, 4th, 
5th Regiments of Cavalry, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 11th, 15th, 16th Batteries Light 
Artillery, 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th regiments of Heavy Artillery. 

On Friday, 22d instant (Forefathers' Day), the colors will be escorted from 
Colonel Clarke's headquarters, No. 2 Bulfinch Street, to the State House, where 
they will be formally received by His Excellency the Governor, and placed in the 
public archives of the Commonwealth, to be sacredly preserved forever, as grand 
emblems of the heroic services and patriotic devotion to liberty and union of one 
hundred and forty thousand of her dead and living sons. 



148 NARRATIVE. 



'The escort will be performed by the 1st Co. of Cadets, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Holmes commanding, who will report to Brevet Colonel Clarke, at his headquarters, 
at 11 o'clock a.m., when the line of march will be taken up. 

All general, regimental and company officers, and past general, regimental and 
company officers of Massachusetts, and especially all officers and past officers, and 
all non-commissioned officers and privates of the several organizations named 
above, are invited to take part in the ceremonj' and join in the procession. The 
officers will, as far as px-acticable, detail a color-guard for the colors of their 
respective late commands. The original date of muster-in of each command will 
govern its place in the procession. Officers and enlisted men, as far as practicable, 
will appear in uniform. 

For further orders and information apply to the Adjutant-General of the Com- 
monwealth. 

By order of His Excellency John A. Andrew, Governor and Commander-in- 
Chief". 

William Schouler, 

Adjutant- General. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Headquarters, Boston, Dec. 13, 1865. 
[General Order No. 19.] 

It having been represented at these headquarters that the Massachusetts regi- 
ments and companies, which had filled their allotted terms of service in the field 
prior to May 15, 1865, the colors of which are deposited in the State House, desire 
to take part in the flag reception on the 22d instant, referred to in General Order 
No. 18, current series, the Commander-in-Chief most cordially complies with their 
wishes. The colors of .these organizations will be handed them on the morning of 
the 22d, upon proper requisition. They are to be returned at the close of the 
services. 

Maj.-Gen. Darius N. Couch of Taunton, ranking officer of volunteers in Massa- 
chusetts, has been invited to take command of the troops. Should he decline, 
Brevet Maj.-Gen. George H. Gordon of Boston, next in rank, will take command. 
The commanding general will arrange details. 

By order of His Excellency John A. Andrew, Governor and Commander-in- 
Chief. 

William Schouler, 

Adjutant- General. 



The procession was duly formed on December 22, under the immediate 
direction of Maj.-Gen. Edward W. Hinks (afterwards Hincks), chief of 
staff, under the following order : — 



THE RETURN OF THE FLAGS. 149 



commonwealth of massachusetts. 

Ceremonies for delivering the Colors of Returned Massachusetts 
Volunteers to the State Authorities. 

State House, Boston, Dec. 19, 1865. 
[Circular No. 3.] 

Composition of the column : Escort of Honor, Independent Corps of Cadets ; 
Lieut.-Col. C. C. Holmes commanding. Maj.-Gen. D. N. Couch commanding. 
Staff of General commanding ; Chief of Staff, Brig. -Gen. Edward W. Hinks. 

Aids to General commanding: Col. A. F. Devereux, Col. and Brevet Maj.- 
Gen. George N. Macy ; Lieut.-Col. Giles A. Rich; Maj. John B. Burt; Maj. 
James Brown; Capt. Augustus Crocker; Lieut, and Brevet Maj. Linus B. Com- 
ins, Jr. 

Surgeon : Maj. Patrick A. O'Connell. 

Aids to Chief of Staff : Capt. and Brevet Maj. J. H. Sleeper ; Capt. and Brevet 
Col. William L. Palmer ; Capt. Joseph J. Baker. 

Brevet Col. Francis N. Clarke, Chief United States Mustering Officer. Staff 
of United States Mustering Officer : general and brevet general officers with their 
staffs, who are not assigned to commands, and general staff officers, mounted. 

Brigade of Cavalry : Brig.-Gen. E. A. Wild commanding. Five regiments a _.d 
one battalion of cavalry. 

Division of Artillery: Brig, and Brevet Maj.-Gen. Joseph Hayes commp.ading. 
First Brigade, sixteen light batteries, Capt. and Brevet Col. Augustus P. Martin 
commanding. Second Brigade, four regiments and two battalions heavy artillery, 
Col. William S. King commanding. 

Corps of Infantry : Brig, and Brevet Maj.-Gen. George H. Gordon command- 
ing. First division, Brig.-Gen. Robert Cowdin commanding, regiments from 1 
to 20 inclusive. Second division, Brig, and Brevet Maj.-Gen. Charles J. Paine 
commanding, regiments from 21 to 40 inclusive. Third division, Col. and Brevet 
Brig.-Gen. William S. Tilton commanding, regiments from 41 to 61 inclusive. 

Route of march: 'From the Common to Tremont Street, to Hanover, to Black- 
stone, to Clinton, to Commercial, to State, to Washington, to Essex, to Harrison 
Avenue, to Dover, to Washington, to Union Park, to Tremont, to Pleasant, to 
Boylston, to Arlington, to Beacon, to the Common. 

On the return of the column to the front of the State House the colors will be 
delivered to His Excellency Governor Andrew by Major-General Couch and Col. 
F. N. Clarke. 

By command of Major-General Couch. 

Edward W. Hinks, 

• Chief of Staff. 

On the day appointed the flags of the regiments were first formally 
handed over by Brevet Col. Francis N. Clarke, United States mustering 



150 NARRATIVE. 



officer, in whose custody they had been deposited. The procession was 
then formed, the veteran troops being represented as follows : — 

Cavalry Division (Brig. -Gen. E. A. Weld). 

3d Cavalry, Col. D. P. Muzzey, 20 officers, 100 men. 
5th Cavalry, Maj. C. F. Adams, Jr., 50 men. 
Frontier Cavalry, 40 men. 

Artillery Division (Brevet Maj. -Gen. Joseph Hayes). 

Heavy Artillery, Col. W. S. King : — 
1st Heavy Artillery, Col. Nathaniel Shatswell, 100 men, six colors 
2d Heavy Artillery, Col. A. B. R. Sprague, 12 officers, 40 men. 
3d Heavy Artillery, Lieut. -Col. J. A. P. Allen, 20 officers, 50 men. 
4th Heavy Artillery, Capt. A. E. Proctor, 7 officers, 15 men. 

Light Artillery, Brevet Col. A. P. Martin : — 
1st Battery, Capt. W. H. McCartney. 
3d Battery, Lieut. A. F. Walcott. 
4th Battery, Capt. G. G. Trull. 
5th Battery, Brevet Maj. C. A. Phillips, 40 men. 
8th Battery, Capt. A. M. Cook, 20 men. 
9th Battery, Capt. R. S. Milton, 20 men. 
10th Battery, Lieut. G. M. Townsend, 25 men. 
11th Battery, Capt. E. J. Jones, 35 men. 
12th Battery, Lieut. J. M. Campbell, 30 men. 
14th Battery, Capt. G. W. Sanborn, 30 men. 

Infantry Division (Brevet Maj. -Gen. George H. Gordon, assisted by 
Brig. -Gen. Robert Cowdin, Brevet Maj. -Gen. Charles J. Paine and 
Brevet Brig. -Gen. W. S. Tilton). 

1st Infantry, Lieut. -Col. C. B. Baldwin, had three State flags and one 
city [flag], mustered 150 men, most of whom wore the badge of the 2d 
Division of the 3d Corps, and some of whom boasted of belonging to 
Hooker's old brigade in McClellan's army. Besides the colonel^ there 
were Maj. Gardner "Walker, Capt. C. M. Jordan, Capt. J. S. Clark, 
Capt. G. E. Henry, Capt. W. S. Johnston, Lieut. R. M. Maguire, Lieut. 
Frank Thomas. 



THE RETURN OF THE FLAGS. 151 

2d Infantry, Capt. D. A. Oakey, had three flags and two staffs from 
which the colors had been shot off. This regiment turned out some 50 
men. Present with it were Adjutant J. A. Fox, Quartermaster M. M. 
Hawes, Chaplain A. H. Quint, Capt. H. M. Comey, Capt. G. J. Thompson, 
Capt. G. A. Thayer. 

3d Infantry, belonging to Plymouth and Bristol counties, had 4 com- 
missioned officers to carry its four colors. Lieut. -Col. James Barton out- 
ranked the other officers on the ground. 

4th Infantry, Col. Henry Walker, 30 men. 

5th Infantry turned out very strongly, having some 300 men in line and 
two flags. Col. G. H. Pierson was in command. 

6th Infantry, Lieut. -Col. Melvin Beal, 30 men, four colors. : 

7th Infantry, a Bristol County regiment, 40 men, carrying two colors ; 
was commanded by Maj. J. B. Leonard. 
^- 8th Infantry, Col. B. F. Peach, Jr., of Lynn, 60 men, two colors. 

9th Infantry, Col. P. R. Guiney, 30 men. 

10th Infantry, Lieut. -Col. J. B. Parsons, 10 officers, 20 men, two flags. 

11th Infantry, Lieut. -Col. T. H. Dunham, Jr., seven colors, 50 men. 

12th Infantry, Lieut. -Col. B. F. Cook, four colors, 6 officers, 50 men. 

13th Infantry, Col. S. H. Leonard, 100 men, three colors. 

15th Infantry, Lieut. -Col. I. H. Hooper, 7 officers, 15 men, two colors. 

17th Infantry, Col. Henry Splaine, 9 officers, 100 men, 5 colors. 

18th Infantry, Maj. Thomas Weston, 10 officers, 20 men, three colors. 

19th Infantry, Col. Edmund Kice, 13 officers, 60 men, five colors. Three 
of the color bearers were one-armed. 

20th Infantry, Col. F. W. Palfrey, 9 officers, 50 men, two colors. 

21st Infantry, 25 men, 6 colors. Accompanying the color bearers of 
this regiment was Sergeant Thomas Plunkett, who had both arms shot off 
at Fredericksburg. 

22d Infantry, Lieut. -Col. Thomas Sherwin, 100 men, four colors. 

23d Infantry, Col. J. W. Raymond, 30 men, three colors. 

25th Infantry, Col. James Tucker, 50 men, three colors. 

Third Battalion Rifles, Capt. M. S. McConville, 10 men, one flag. 

26th Infantry, Col. A. B. Farr, 12 officers, 20 men, four colors. 

27th Infantry, Adjutant J. W. Holmes, 2 officers, 12 men, three colors. 

28th Infantry, Capt. John Miles, 50 men, six colors. 



152 NARRATIVE. 



29th Infantry, Lieut. -Col. C. D. Browne, 100 men, four colors. 

30th Infantry, Lieut. -Col. H. O. Whittemore, 30 men, three colors. 
The regiment is still in the field. 

31st Infantry, Maj. L. F. Eice, 2 officers, 8 men, five colors. 

32d Infantry, Col. J. A. Cunningham, 200 men, three colors. 

33d Infantry, Lieut.-Col. A. W. Tebbetts, 80 men, six colors. 

34th Infantry, Col. W. S. Lincoln, 36 men, two colors, 

35th Infantry, Lieut.-Col. J. W. Hudson, 150 men, four colors. 

36th Infantry, Col. T. L. Barker, 50 men, four colors. 

37th Infantry, Quartermaster-Sergeant Sears, 3 men, each with a color. 
--- 38th Infantry, Lieut.-Col. J. P. Richardson, 50 men, four colors. 

39th Infantry, Col. C. L. Peirson, 100 men, four colors. 

40th Infantry, Maj. J. L. Elder, 100 men, two colors: 

42d Infantry, Col. I. S. Burrill, 90 men, two colors. 

43d Infantry, Col. C. L. Holbrook, 11 officers, 75 men, two colors. 

44th Infantry, Col. Francis L. Lee, 50 men, two colors. 

45th Infantry, Col. C. R. Codman, 70 men, two colors. 

46th Infantry, Col. W. S. Shurtleff, 50 men, two colors. 

47th Infantry, Col. L. B. Marsh, 16 officers, 65 men, two colors. 

48th Infantry, Sergeant Wait, two colors. 

49th Infantry, Capt. Johns, 3 men, two colors. 

51st Infantry, Capt. E. A. Wood, two colors. 

53d Infantry, Col. T. D. Kimball, 12 officers, 20 men, two colors. 

54th Infantry, Brevet Brig. -Gen. E. N. Hallowell, 8 officers, 51 men, 
two colors. 

55th Infantry, 16 officers, 25 men, two colors. 

56th Infantry, 60 men, three colors. 

57th and 59th Infantries consolidated, Lieut.-Col. J. M. Tucker, 10 
officers, 50 men, two colors. 

58th Infantry, Lieut.-Col. E. S. Horton, 30 men, two colors. 

60th Infantry, Col. A. D. Wass, two colors. 

61st Infantry, CoL E. W. Stone, 60 men, two colors. 

Gilmore's band preceded the infantry corps. 1 

1 The names and facts in this list are taken from the Massachusetts Adjutant-General's Report (Jan- 
uary, 1866), pp. 83-85. The rank attributed to officers is, in some cases that of a State commission issued, 
to which the officer was never actually mustered. There was no Captain Johns in the 49th Infantry, but 
the officer named is probably Brevet Capt. H. T. Johns of the 61st, who was originally a member of the 
49th, and may have marched with it on this day. 



THE RETURN OF THE FLAGS. 153 

The streets were crowded with a great multitude of spectators, and 
when the State House was reached General Couch addressed the Governor 
as follows : — 

May it please Your Excellency : We have come here to-day as the representa- 
tives of the army of volunteers furnished by Massachusetts for the suppression of 
the rebellion, bringing these colors in order to return them to the State, who 
intrusted them to our keeping. You must, however, pardon us if we give them 
up with profound regret, — for these tattered shreds forcibly remind us of long and 
fatiguing marches, cold bivouacs and many hard-fought battles. The rents in their 
folds, the battle-stains on their escutcheons, the blood of our comrades that has 
sanctified the soil of an hundred fields, attest the sacrifices that have been made, 
the courage and constancy shown, that the nation might live. It is, sir, a peculiar 
satisfaction and pleasure to us that you, who have been an honor to the State and 
nation, from your marked patriotism and fidelity throughout the war, and have 
been identified with every organization before you, are now here to I'eceive back, 
as the State custodian of her precious relics, these emblems of the devotion of her 
sons. May it please Your Excellency, the colors of the Massachusetts Volunteers 
are returned to the State. 



Governor Andrew replied in the following address : — 

General : This pageant, so full of pathos and of glory, forms the concluding 
scene in the long series of visible actions and events, in which Massachusetts has 
borne a part, for the overthrow of rebellion and the vindication of the Union. 

These banners return to the government of the Commonwealth through welcome 
hands. Borne, one by one, out of this capitol, during more than four years of 
civil war, as the symbols of the nation and the Commonwealth, under which the 
battalions of Massachusetts departed to the field, they come back again, borne 
hither by surviving representatives of the same heroic regiments and companies to 
which they were intrusted. 

At the hands, General, of yourself, the ranking officer of the Volunteers of the 
Commonwealth (one of the earliest who accepted a regimental command under 
appointment of the Governor of Massachusetts), and of this grand column of 
scarred and heroic veterans who guard them home, they are returned with honors 
becoming relics so venerable, soldiers so brave and citizens so beloved. 

Proud memories of many a field ; sweet memories alike of valor and friendship ; 
sad memories of fraternal strife ; tender memories of our fallen brothers and sons, 
whose dying eyes looked last upon their flaming folds ; grand memories of heroic 
virtues sublimed by grief ; exultant memories of the great and final victory of our 
country, our Union and the righteous cause ; thankful memories of a deliverance 
wrought out for human nature itself, unexampled by any former achievement of 
arms; immortal memories with immortal honors blended, — twine round these 



154 NARRATIVE. 



splintered staves, weave themselves along the warp and woof of these familiar 
flags, war-worn, begrimed and baptized with blood. 

Let the " brave heart, the trusty heart, the deep, unfathomable heart," in words 
of more than mortal eloquence, uttered, though unexpressed, speak the emotions of 
grateful veneration, for which these lips of mine are alike too feeble and unworthy. 

General, I accept these relics in behalf of the people and the government. 
They will be preserved and cherished, amid all the vicissitudes of the future, as 
mementos of brave men and noble actions. 1 

With this closing pledge from the War Governor of Massachusetts, 
this brief record of the service rendered by the Commonwealth may 
fitly end. 

1 Massachusetts Adjutant-General's Report (January, 1866), pp. 86-88. 



Condensed History of Reqihents, 



PREFATORY NOTE. 



The statistical tables here given are in many cases simply approximate. 
This is the case in all similar works, but it is not always acknowledged. 
Nothing is more plausible to the eye than a compact and well-arranged series 
of tables ; and they may look just as imposing when they are not worth the 
paper on which they are written. All that has been previously said about 
the difficulty of detailed accuracy applies in the highest force to these 
figures. In some cases, for instance, men missing after a battle were 
promptly dropped from the regimental rolls, in other cases they were 
allowed to remain indefinitely ; in some cases recruits were taken up on the 
list as soon as the names were forwarded, in other cases the men deserted on 
the way and never appeared on any regimental list at all. In most regi- 
ments there was a mingling of men enlisted at different dates, and subject to 
discharge at various times ; in some cases three months' men and three 
years' men were combined ; in some cases reduced regiments were consoli- 
dated. There were cases in which, on the return of regiments, there was no 
mustering officer at hand to muster them out ; they were then dismissed to 
their homes, with orders to come back on a certain day and meet the officer. 
Some of these men did not take the pains to return for the mere technicality, 
and thus have never been legally mustered out to this day, — perhaps stand 
recorded as deserters. In other cases men were transferred, while on 
detached service, from one regiment to another, were perhaps dropped from 
the rolls of one and never taken up on the rolls of the other, being thus left 
free to drop out of the ranks altogether if they wished. Adjutants were ill 
or were killed, and their notes and memoranda were taken up and carried 
on, after a fashion, by some one wholly new to the work. There are at this 



156 CONDENSED HISTORY OF REGIMENTS. 

moment, probably, thousands of pension applications awaiting action and 
likely never to be acted upon, merely from complications like these ; and 
there were very few regiments whose tabular statements are not embarrassed 
by just such difficulties. The statistics of recruits, in particular, are some- 
times so confusing that they have to be ignored altogether, thus making 
the aggregate of some regiments appear lower than it actually was. It must 
be distinctly understood, therefore, that the following tables represent in 
many cases only approximate figures. 

It is now the general tendency of military statisticians to class the 
mortally wounded with the killed, not with the wounded ; and yet it is 
impossible to establish any but an arbitrary limit for this classification, since 
a man may be mortally wounded and yet live for many weeks or even 
months. In the same way it is impossible to discriminate positively between 
those mortally wounded and those dying in prison ; or even to determine 
whether a soldier — as in the case of Stonewall Jackson — was killed acci- 
dentally or by the enemy. In all cases the figures here given replace entirely 
those given in a circular of inquiry, in pamphlet form, printed and dis- 
tributed from this office in 1891, and based on the comparatively scanty 
information then attainable. None of the present tables are taken from 
those in the printed regimental histories, though much use has been made of 
these ; but they are all based on manuscript name-lists prepared for the 
purpose and founded (1) on printed State records, (2) on original 
muster rolls and monthly returns, (3) on corrections received from the 
United States War Department, usually through the office of the Massa- 
chusetts Adjutant-General, but sometimes directly. The "number on 
regimental rolls " is designed to include every individual who actually 
served with the regiment, but not re-enlistments in the same regiment. 
" Casualties by engagements " includes men killed in action or mortally 
wounded, and also those missing in action, probably killed. No attempt 
has been made to give statistics as to the number of wounded in action, 
because the method of recording these differed so greatly in different 
regiments — some officers recording very slight wounds and others ignor- 
ing all but serious ones — that there exists no solid basis of comparison. 
The prison list* which follows later, is mainly prepared from several 
unofficial manuscript books on file at the Adjutant-General's Office, 
purporting to give lists of Massachusetts officers and soldiers who died 



PREFATORY NOTE. 157 



either in Confederate prisons or in the camps of paroled prisoners. 
These books give also the dates of their supposed deaths, the whole 
being made up largely from the affidavits of returning comrades. The 
precise authorship of these books is now unknown, but they were probably 
compiled under the general direction of Col. Gardner Tufts, State Relief 
Agent at Washington, who was in the habit of sending out men to meet 
returned prisoners and to obtain information as to those left behind. 
This information was necessarily hearsay evidence, and in many cases 
may have proved incorrect, or only approximate. It was easy to err 
in regard to the middle initial of a soldier's name, or to forget whether 
he had served in the 2d Infantry or 2d Cavalry ; especially if he had, 
as sometimes happened to a prisoner, exchanged his own tattered uniform 
for that of a dead soldier of some other regiment; possibly from some 
other State. The actual fact of death was also sometimes a matter of 
mere surmise ; if the witness said that a certain soldier was " dying when 
he left," this man's name would naturally go upon the rolls, although his 
disease might in twenty-four hours have taken a favorable turn, so that 
the patient actually recovered. The only possible remedy for these errors 
has been in comparing the lists, as carefully as possible, with the names 
and records to be found on the original rolls or in the best regimental 
histories, and this has been done. Names not thus confirmed are marked 
with a star, and any additional information has been appended in foot- 
notes. It has been thought better to print even doubtful cases, — the 
doubt being indicated, — than to omit any that may possibly be authentic. 



158 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



First Regiment Massachusetts Cavalry. 

(1) Col. Robert Williams, Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(2) Col. Horace Binney Sargent, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(3) Col. Samuel Emery Chamberlain, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





2 

•a 
c 
<s 

2 
*c3 


c 


Companies. 


O 

a> 
K 






A 


B 


C 


D 


B 


F 


G 


H 


I I 1 


K 


K 1 


L. 


L 1 


M M 1 


09 
"3 

o 
H 


Number on regimental rolls,- 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 2 . 

Totals, .... 


26 
23 

6 

6 

26 
17 


81 
81 


196 

2 
3 
5 

191 


149 

3 
2 

5 

144 


140 

3 
1 

4 

136 


162 

3 
3 
6 

156 


189 

5 
2 

7 

182 


168 

2 
2 
4 

164 


126 
2 

2 

124 


193 

3 

1 
4 

189 


94 

1 

1 

93 


101 
1 

1 

100 


100 
1 


93 

1 


92 


89 
1 


89 
1 


98 

1 
1 


30 


107 
2,132 
2,239 


Enlistedmen (includedabove) 
commissioned in regi- 
ment. 2 

Enlistedmen (includedabove) 
serving elsewhere within 
regiment. 


33 
18 


Totals, .... 


1 
99 


1 
92 


92 


1 

88 


1 

88 


2 
96 


30 


51 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 

Officers, .... 

Enlisted men, 2 


107 
2,081 


Totals, .... 




2,188 



1 New. 



2 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 1st Cavalry was made up almost entirely from State organizations already existing, including among its 
early volunteers members of the Boston Lancers, Waltham Dragoons, North Brldgewater Dragoons and Springfield 
Horseguards. The first enlistments were made in the early part of September, 1861, and on September 11 Robert 
Williams of Virginia, captain, assistant adjutant-general, U. S. Army, was appointed by Governor Andrew as 
colonel of the regiment, being recommended by Gen. Winfield Scott. The 1st Battalion, comprising Cos. A, B, C 
and D, under Maj. Greely 8. Curtis, left Massachusetts December 25 and went to Annapolis, Md. The 2d 
and 3d Battalions, leaving on December 26 and 28, remained ten days in New York and then went on to Hilton 
Head, S. C, and were joined in a short time by the 1st Battalion. In the movement against Charleston, S. C, 
Colonel Williams commanded the brigade of which the regiment formed a part. The 1st and 2d Battalions joined 
the army of the Potomac in Virginia, Aug. 19, 1862, and the 3d Battalion remained in South Carolina in command 
of Maj. A. H. Stevens, Jr., three companies being stationed at Beaufort and the other at Hilton Head; here it 
remained for some months, engaging in picket and patrol duty, with a reconnoissance Oct. 22, 1862, to Pocotaligo, 
S. C. ; and in June, 1863, a detachment on duty at Folly and Morris islands took part in the siege of Fort Sumter. 
On Aug. 4, 1863, the battalion was permanently detached from the 1st Cavalry and called the Independent Battalion, 
Mass. Cavalry Vols., and engaged in^the expedition to St. John's River, Fla. By special order, dated Feb. 12, 
1864, the Independent Battalion became 1st Battalion, 4th Mass. Cavalry, and under this organizatio. was ordered 
to Virginia in May, 1864, and its subsequent history will be found with the 4th Mass. Cavalry. The 1st and 2d 
' Battalions with the army of the Potomac took part in the marches and skirmishes which preceded the battles of 
\ Antietam and Fredericksburg. They took active part in the campaigns of 1863-64, a new battalion of fou' - com- 
panies joining them at Warrenton, Va., in March, 1864. The regiment was stationed on provost duty at Oity 
Point in March, 1865, and served afterward in the defences of Washington until mustered out June 26, 1865. 

Present also at Poolesville, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancelloreville, Upperville, Gettysburg, 
Williamsport, Culpeper, Auburn, fortifications of Richmond and Cold Harbor. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



159 



First Regiment Massachusetts Cavalry. 







in 

03 
en 

•a 

B 
03 
JS 

E 


c3 

c 

3 


Companies. 


"5 
m 






A 


b! 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


I 1 


K 


K 1 


L 


L' M 


M 1 


3 

o 


Killed and died of wounds 
Officers, 
Enlisted men, 2 

Totals, 

Died by accident or diseas 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 2 
Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 
Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 2 

Totals, 


> 


1 
1 

1 

1 
2 


6 
6 


10 

9 

4 
24 


13 

3 

1 

17 


2 

5 

3 

10 


13 

9 

22 


10 

3 
12 

25 


10 

3 

4 

17 


6 

5 

4 

15 


9 

5 

3 

17 


2 

5 

7 


4 

5 

4 

13 


2 

4 
6 


5 

5 

11 
21 


1 

3 

4 


2 

4 

8 

15 


6 
6 


2 

6 

3 

11 


7 

7 


92 
99 

88 

57 

f 
239 

246 







Casualties 


by Engagements. 






















1863. 

June 16, Secessionville, S. C, . 
Nov. 3, Snicker's Gap, Va., . 

1863. 

Mar. 17, Kelly's Ford, Va., . 

June 3, Warrenton Road, Va., 
June 9, Brandy Station, Va., 
June 17, Aldie, Va., . 
Sept. 14, Rapidan Station, Va., 
Oct. 12, White Sulphur Springs, 
Va. 

Nov. 27, NewHope Church, Va., 
Nov. 29, Parker's Store, Va., . 

1864. 

Feb. 10, Barber's Ford, Fla., . 
Mar. 1, McGurth's Creek, Fla., 
May5,6, Todd's Tavern, Va., . 
May 11, Ashland, Va., .. " . 
May 28, Salem Church, Va., . 
June -, Place unknown, . 
June 24, St. Mary's Church, Va., 
July 28, New Market, Va., 
July 30, Lee's Mills, Va., . 
Aug. 14-18, Malvern Hill (Deep 

Bottom), Va. 
Aug. 23, Reams' Station, Va., . 
Sept. 16, Jerusalem Road. Va., 
Oct. 1, Vaughan Road, Va., . 
Oct- 14, Place unknown, . 
Dec. 9, Belletield Station, Va., 

1865. 

April 30, Lynchburg, Va., 
Place unknown, . 


1 

1 

1 

n 
1 
1 

1 


- 


7 

1 
1 

] 


1 
6 

3 

1 
1 
1 


1 
1 


11 
1 


1 

1 

1 

1 

2 
1 

1 
1 

1 


1 
1 
1 

1 

3 

2 
1 


1 
1 

3 


1 

1 
2 

1 
2 

1 

1 


2 
1 


1 


1 
1 


2 

1 
2 


1 
1 


1 
1 


- 


1 

1 


- 


1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
4 
29 
3 
1 

1 
9 
1 

4 
1 
5 
7 
3 
1 
2 
7 
1 
3 

2 
3 
2 
2 
1 

1 
4 



1 New. 



s Including non-commissioned staff. 



s Non-commissioned staff. 



160 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Second Regiment Massachusetts Cavalry. 

(1) Col. Charles Russell Lowell, Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(2) Col. Caspar Crowninshield, Bvt. Brig. Gen. IT. S. Vols. 





cs 

03 

•a 
G 
a 

s 

£ 


c 
t3 


• 

Companies. 


03 

1 
5 






A 


B 


O 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


DQ 

1 
H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men,' . 


16 
16 

3 

3 

16 
13 


75 


168 

11 
5 


151 


174 


136 


157 


156 


176 


183 


155 


168 


142 


155 


72 


91 

2,009 


Totals, .... 


2 
4 


1 


2 


2 


4 

1 


2 
2 


- 


1 
2 


1 
1 


7 
1 


4 


2,100 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
regiment. 


40 
16 


Totals, .... 


75 


16 
152 


6 

145 


1 
173 


2 
134 


2 

155 


5 
151 


4 
172 


183 


3 

152 


2 
166 


8 
134 


4 
151 


72 


56 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men," . 


91 
1,953 


Totals, .... 






















2,044 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 2d Mass. Cavalry was organized in the autumn of 1862. Co. A, the first company formed, being raised in 
California by Capt. J. Sewell Read in November and December, and mustered into service at San Francisco, Cal., 
on December 10; it reached Boston January 3, and was counted on the quota of that city. A detachment of five 
companies, mustered in at Readville, Mass., at varying dates in January and February, 1863, left Massachusetts 
Feb. 12, 1863, under command of Maj. Caspar Crowninshield, and went into camp at Gloucester Point, opposite 
Torktown, Va. The remaining companies of the regiment, California furnishingfour of these, were organized and 
mustered into service from February to May, 1863, under Col. Charles Russell Lowell, and, leaving Readville May 
11, encamped near "Washington, moving camp on June 23 to Poolesville, Md. On August 6 the detachment at 
Gloucester Point joined the main body at Centreville, Va., and the regiment was united with the 13th and 16th N. Y. 
Cavalries to form a brigade, with Colonel Lowell as brigade commander. On September 15 four companies were 
detached under Major Thompson and sent into Maryland, where they remained until the spring of 1864. The regi- 
ment remained in camp at Centreville, Va., until the first of October, on Oct. 9, 1863, moving to Vienna, Va., 
where it remained during the autumn and winter. In July, 1864, the regiment took part in the defence of Washing- 
ton, and as part of the 3d Brigade, under ColoDel Lowell, was in constant action during the month of August. At 
the battle of the Opequon, September 19, it was closely engaged, and moved afterwards up the Luray valley, where, 
at Luray Court House, a Confederate flag was captured by Philip Baybutt of Co. A. In the battle of Cedar Creek 
the regiment met its saddest loss, Colonel Lowell being wounded there, and dying the next day at Middletown, Va. 
The regiment went into winter quarters in December at Winchester, Va.; and at this time, though the regiment 
numbered 1,100 men, only 15 officers and 500 men were present, 200 were in Southern prisons, over 200 absent, wounded 
or sick, and over 100 absent on detached service; in January, 175 recruits were added. In February, 1865, as part of 
the 1st Division, Reserve Brigade, the regiment advanced to Petersburg ; after the evacuation of Richmond it engaged 
in the pursuit of the Confederates until the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox. Having encamped for a time 
near Petersburg, it took part under General Sheridan against Johnston's army; participated afterward in the grand 
review at Washington, and, after remaining in camp in Fairfax County until July 20, 1865, was mustered out at Fair- 
fax Court House, being finally paid off and discharged Aug. 3, 1865, at Readville, Mass. 

Present also at Fort Reno, Poolesville, Summit Point, Luray, Tom's Brook, South Anna, White Oak Road, 
Dinwiddie Court House, Sailor's Creek and Appomattox. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



161 



Second Regiment Massachusetts Cavalry. 





"S 

5 


o 

3 


Companies. 


(A 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


O 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


1 
1 

1 

1 


/ 

2 

9 


10 


5 


3 


6 


6 


4 




3 


9 


6 


9 


5 




8 
66 


Totals, .... 


2 

2 
14 


6 


5 


3 


7 


7 


5 


3 

4 
10 


4 


9 


5 


6 


6 


74 


Died by accident and disease, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 •. 


2 
69 


Totals, .... 


11 
22 


3 
11 


1 
10 


7 
20 


6 

17 


5 
10 


3 
16 


15 


3 

17 


21 
32 


6 


71 


Died as prisoners, — 

Men 

Total losses, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


66 

10 
201 






























211 







Casualties 


by Engagements. 
















1863. 

June 20, King and Queen's 
Court House, Va. 

June 26, South Anna Bridge, 
Va. 

July 12, Ashby's Gap, Va., . 

Aug. 24, Coy'le Tavern, Va., . 

1864. 

Feb. 22, Dranesville, Va., 
April 20, Leesburg, Va., . 
April 30? Rectortown, Va., 
May 24, Difficult Run, Va., . 
July 6, Mt. Zion Church 

(Aldie) , Va. 
July 12, Fort Stevens, D. C, 
July 13, Rockv'ille, Md., 
Aug. 21, Berryvjlle, Va., 
Aug. 26, Halltown, Va., 
Aug. 25-28, Charlestown, Va., 
Sept. 7-12, Opequon Creek, 

Va. • 
Sept. 19, Opequon (Winches- 
ter), Va. 
Sept. 28, Waynesboro', Va., . 
Oct. 8, Near ' Round Top 

Mountain, Va. 
Oct. 19, Cedar Creek, Va., . 

1865. 

Mar. 31, Petersburg, Va., 

April 1, Five Forks, Va., 

Place unknown, 


1 


1 
1 

2 

1 
1 
1 


1 
1 

2 

1 

2 
1 

1 

1 


5 


1 

2 


1 
1 

2 

1 

1 


1 

1 
2 


1 

2 
1 


- 


1 

1 
1 

1 


4 

1 
2 

1 


1 

1 

1 
1 


1 
1 

2 
2 


1 

2 

1 

1 


- 


1 

1 

2 
2 
3 
1 

10 
1 
1 
1 
9 

2 
4 
1 
3 
2 
4 

2 

5 
1 

10 

1 
1 
6 



1 Including non-eomraisBioned staff. 



162 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Third Regiment Massachusetts Cavalry. 

(1) Col. Thomas Ed-ward Chickering, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(2) Col. Lorenzo Dow S urgent. 

(3) Col. Burr Porter. 





w 

■a 

c 

2 


a 
3 


Companies. 


to 

H 

o 
a 

M 






A 


B 


O 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


L 1 


M 


M 1 




in 

"5 

o 
H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers 

Men, 4 .... 


22 
26 

7 

7 

22 
19 


76 
76 


200 

2 
2 


201 

3 

2 


179 
1 


212 

5 
4 


98 

4 

4 
94 


90 

1 

1 


85 
2 


92 


110 

3 
1 


105 

1 
1 


157 

5 


98 


115 

3 
2 


88 


115 

2 


119 


98 
2,090 


Totals, .... 


- 


2,188 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 2 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
regiment. 


39 
13 


Totals, .... 


4 

196 


5 
196 


1 

178 


9 
203 


2 
88 


2 
83 


92 


4 
106 


2 
103 


5 
152 


98 


5 
110 


88 


2 

113 

I 


119 


52 


Actual total of members of 
regiment. — 
Officers, .... 
Men, 2 .... 


98 
2,038 


Totals, .... 






























1 




2,136 



1 One year'B service. 



2 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 3d Ma6s. Cavalry was formed June 17, 1863, from four already existing organizations : the 1st, 2d and 3d Cos. 
Unattached Cavalry and the 41st Regiment Infantry. The 1st Co. Unattached Cavalry, organized as 1st Co. Mounted 
Rifle Rangers, was recruited by Capt. S. Tyler Bead in Boston duiing September, 1861, and, completing its organi- 
zation on November 15, with the 2d Co. Mounted Rangers, under Captain Magee, and the 3d Co. Unattached Cavalry, 
under Captain Durivage, left Boston harbor Jan. 13, 1862, and arrived at Ship Islaud, Miss., February 12. Here the 
three companies were united in a battalion, with Captain Read as acting major. On the formation of General But- 
ler's division into brigades, the companies were separated and the 1st Co., forming part of the 1st Brigade, on April 
16, 1862, left Ship Island for New Orleans, and was stationed in charge of its defence until May 1, 1S64. The 2d 
Co., under Major-General Williams, entered in the engagement against Baton Rouge, and after the evacuation of 
the city, leturning to New Orleans, remained there until the spring of 1863. Captain Durivage of the 3d Unattached 
Co. was diowned in the Mississippi River on April 23, 1862, four months after the organization of the company; and 
Jonathan E. Cowan, appointed in his place, being on leave of absence, the organization served under Lieutenant 
Perkins; in September, 1862, it became part of ,Weitzel's Brigade, and encamped at Thibodeaux, La., during the 
winter of 1862-63. In the autumn of 1862 the 41st Mass. Infantry, the remaining organization to unite in forming the 
3d Cavalry, was recruited at Lynnfield and Boxford, Mass., and, under Col. Thomas E. Chickering of Boston, it left 
the State Nov. 5, 1862, and took up itB quarters at Baton Rouge, La. Sharing in the Teche expedition in April, 1863, 
it occupied Opelousas and Barre's Landing. On June 17 the four organizations united to form the 3d Cavalry, 
under Colonel Chickering. The regiment took part in the siege of Port Hudson, and in the spring of 1864 it began 
its part iu the Red River campaign ; in the latter part of July, organized aB infantry, it was transferred to Maryland, 
becoming part of the 2d Brigade, 19th Army Corps, and engaged in the battles of the Opequon and Cedar Creek, 
going into winter quarters at Pleasant Valley, Md , on Dec. 28, 1864. Iu February, 1865, it was again equipped as 
cavalry, and in March returned to Virginia. At the close of the previous year the three independent cavalry com- 
panies were mustered out and their places were filled by other Massachusetts men. On May 20 those who bad 
originally formed the 41st Infantry were mustered out. The regiment left Washington for Fort Leavenworth, 
Kan., June 14, 1865; served in Kansas and Nebraska during the summer, and was mustered out of service Sept. 28, 
1865. Proceeding at once to Boston, the members of the regiment were paid off and discharged, October 6, at 
Gallop's Island. 

Present also at Irish Bend, Henderson Hill, Georgia Landing, Cane River, Muddy Bayou, Piney Woods and 
Snag Point. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



163 



Third Regiment 


Massachusetts I 


Cavalry 


► 














C3 
■*-» 
CO 

•a 
a 

'3 


c 

3 


Companies. 


tn 

-** 

'3 
t-i 


CD 

M 






A 


B 1 


c 


D l 


E 


P 


G 


H 


i 


K 


L 


L 1 


M M 1 


CO 


s 


Eh 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Officers, .... 
Men, 


- 


5 


10 


11 


10 


1 


9 


2 


2 


6 


5 


5 


9 




6 




5 




5 

81 


Missing, 

Died by accident and disease, — 

Officers, .... 

Men, 2 


1 


2 


13 


10 


12 


1 
15 


1 
7 


5 


10 


1 
11 


7 


8 


15 


2 


13 


1 


- 


5 


86 

3 

2 
135 


Totals, .... 

Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, .... 

Men, 

Total losses, — 

Officers, .... 

Men, 2 


1 


7 


2 
25 


3 
24 


3 

25 


8 
25 


17 


2 
9 


6 
18 


1 
19 


12 


13 


1 
25 


2 


5 
24 


1 


1 
6 


5 


137 

32 

7 
251 


Totals, .... 




















258 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1862. 

June 3, Place unknown, 
Nov. 4, Louisiana, . 
Dec. 29, Louisiana, . 

Place unknown, 

1868. 

May -, Bayou Jack, La., 
May 15, Independence Station, 

La. 
June 2, Clinton, La., 
June 2, Brashear City, La., . 
June 15, Port Hudson, La., 
Aug. 3, Jackson, La., 
Nov. 9, White Plains, La., 
Nov. 30, Plane Stores, La., 
Nov. 30, Near Port Hudson, 
La. 
Place unknown, 

1864. 

April 8, Sabine Cross Roads, 
La. 

May 1, Alexandria, La., 

May 15-18, Yellow Bayou 
(Bayou de Glaize), 
La. 

Sept. 19, Opequon (Winches- 
ter) , Va. 

Sept. 22, Fisher's Hill, Va., . 

Oct. 19, Cedar Creek, Va., 
Place unknown, 

1865. 

Place unknown, 



- 1 



2 
1 

2 
1 
1 
5 
1 
2 
2 



- 9 



24 

2 

14 

6 



1 One year's service. 



2 Including non-commissioned staff. 



164 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fourth Regiment Massachusetts Cavalry. 

(1) Col. Arnold Augustus Rand. 

(2) Col. Francis Washburn, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(3) Col. Horatio Jenkins, Jr., Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





*3 




Companies. 








5 






W 
























| 




tn 




o 


B 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 1 L 


M 


U 


■£ 




fa 


ti 




















1 




K 


C— 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 


18 


70 




























88 


Enlisted men, 1 . 


19 


— 


132 


120 


118 


125 


119 


114 


115 


109 


145 


148 


179 


168 


10 


1,621 


Totals, .... 






















1,709 




— — ~ 


Enlisted men (included above) 


12 


_ 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


_ 


4 


1 


5 


3 


- 


33 


commissioned in regiment. 1 


































Enlisted men (included above) 












2 


1 


— 


_ 


1 


4 


o 


2 


_ 




12 


serving elsewhere within 


































regiment. 


12 


— 


2 
























- 




Totals, .... 


1 


1 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 


8 


3 


7 


3 


45 




•• — — 


Actual total of members of 


































regiment, — 

Officers, .... 


18 


70 


























88 


Enlisted men, 1 . 


7 




130 


119 


117 


122 


117 


113 


114 1 108 


137 


145 


172 


165 


10 


1,576 
















1 i 










1,664 



1 Including non commissioned staff. 



The 4th Mass. Cavalry, under Col. Arnold Augustus Rand, was organized Feb. 12, 1864. The first of the three 
battalions composing it, the Independent Battalion Mass. Cavalry, at that time stationed in South Carolina, was 
oiiginally part of the 1st Mass. Cavalry ; and the record of its service from December, 1861, to May, 1864, forms part 
of the history of that regiment. The 2d Battalion was recruited in February, 1864, and left the State on March 20 
in command of Maj. David B. Keith; the 3d Battalion, under Major Cabot, left ou April 23. The 2d Battalion, 
stationed at Hilton Head, S. C, engaged in an expedition up the Ashepoo River in May; in June two companies, 
under Capt. Joseph W. Morton, moved to Jacksonville, Fla., and made their headquarters there, in August forming 
part of an expedition to Palatka, Fla. In July a detachment of the battalion, under Captain Staples, engaged in an 
expedition to St. John's Island, S. C. The battalion leraained stationed thus by detachments at Hilton Head, S. C, 
and Jacksonville, Fla. ^throughout the year and until the close of the war. Immediately after organization the 1st 
and 3d Battalions were ordered to Virginia; the 3d encamping at Newport News during most of the month of May, 
1864, and afterward establishing headquarters at City Point, Va.; while the 1st Battalion, Under command of Captain 
Richmond, moved to Petersburg, being in action at Bermuda Hundred and Drewry's Bluff. In June Cos. E and H 
of the 3d Battalion, under Captain Ray, were on detached service with the 18th Army Corps. On August 15 these 
two battalions, under command of Colonel Rand, became a part of the 10th Army Corps and took part in the siege 
of Petersburg, remaining thus engaged until the spring of 1865. Meauwhile four companies were detached and 
joined the 24th and 25th Army Corps, remaining with them until their muster out, and taking part with them in the 
pursuit of the Confederate army and the occupation of Richmond. Cos. I, L and M before Petersburg met at High 
Bridge, Va., the greatest loss which the regiment suffered durin% its service. After the surrender of General Lee, 
all the detachmeuts being united, the regiment remained at Richmond during the summer and autumn of 1865, were 
mustered out of service November 14, and, returning to Boston, were paid off and discharged at Gallop's Island 
Nov. 26, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



165 



Fourth Regiment Massachusetts Cavalry. 














ci 

OQ 

■a 
S 


o 

3 


Companies. 








A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


s 

O 
EH 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


1 


3 

1 


1 


5 


3 


6 










2 


1 


2 


2 




4 
22 


Totals 

Died by accident and disease, — 
Enlisted men, 


11 


5 


9 


12 


9 


7 


8 


3 


8 


2 


9 


8 


1 


26 

1 

92 


Totals, .... 

Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


2 


13 




5 


1 






3 










93 

1 
24 


Totals, .... 


1 


5 


14 


23 


12 


23 


10' 


7 


8 


3 


13 


3 


11 


1 

10 


1 


25 


Total losses, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


6 

138 


















144 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1864. 

April 2, Place unknown, 
May -, Between Petersburg 

and Fort Darling, 

Va. 
June 9, Petersburg, Va., 
July 17, St. John's Island, 
- S. C. 

Aug. 13, Magnolia, Fla.,— 

Picket. 
Aug. 17, Gainesville, Fla., 
Oct. 13, Clark's Farm, Va., . 
Oct. 24, Gum Creek, Fla., . 
Place unknown, 

1865. 

Jan. 15, South Carolina, 
Feb. 19, Manning, S. C, 
April 6, High Bridge, Va., . 


i 


3 


1 


1 
1 

2 


1 

1 
1 


2 
1 

1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 
1 


1 


1 
1 


1 
1 


- 


1 
1 

1 
1 

2 
1 

2 
1 
4 
4 

1 
1 
6 



Present, also at Drewry's Bluff, and the engagements before Petersburg and Richmond. 



166 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fifth Regiment Massachusetts Cavalry. 

(1) Col. Henry S. Russell. 

(2) Col. Charles F. Adams. 

(3) Col. Samuel E. Chamberlain, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





a 
en 

•a 
C 
cS 

"cy 

5 


c 
3 


Companies. 


CO 

'3 

u 
o 

H 




' 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


CO 

o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


13 

7 

13 

7 


48 
48 


104 


117 


115 


109 


108 


108 


113 


107 


111 


111 


104 


110 


1 
1 


61 
1,325 




104 


1 
116 


1 
114 


1 

108 


1 
107 


108 


113 


107 


111 


111 


104 


1 
109 


1,386 


Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
regiment. 
Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


~5 


61 
1,320 


Totals, .... 




























1,381 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 5th Cavalry, the only regiment of colored cavalry organized in Massachusetts, was recruited in the autumn 
and winter of 1863 and 1864, and in three battalions left the State from May 5 to 8, 1864. The 1st Battalion, compris- 
ing Cos. A, mustered Jan. 9, 1864, and B, C and D, mustered January 29, in command of Maj. Horace N. "Weld, 
reached "Washington May 7, and on the 13th, serving as infantry, joined the brigade of colored troops at Camp 
Casey. Cos. E, mustered February 10, F, February 23, G- and H, mustered in March, formed the 2d Battalion, 
commanded by Maj. Z. B. Adams ; and with the 3d Battalion comprising Cos. I, mustered March 26, K and L, mustered 
in April, and M, on May 5, joined the 1st Battalion, at Camp Casey before the 14th of May. On the 16th the regiment 
was assigned to the 3d Division, 18th Army Corps, and, equipped as infantry, was stationed at City Point, Va., 
serving in detachments, in reconnoitring expeditions and picket duty. The most severe engagement in which the 
regiment took part occurred at Baylor's Farm, on the Petersburg Road, in June; Colonel Russell being wounded 
here, the command was assumed by Maj. H. P. Bowditch. For a time the regiment was a part of Hincks' Division, 
Wild's Brigade, 18th Army Corps, and was on duty before Petersburg; but on June 29 it was assigned to the 10th 
Corps, and was stationed at Point Lookout, Md., during the remainder of the year. In February, 1865, under 
Colonel Adams, Colonel Russell having resigned, the regiment took part in the 6iege of Petersburg, and after the 
surrender encamped in the vicinity of City Point until June, when it was ordered to Clarksville, Tex. ; here it 
remained until Oct. 31, 1865, when it was mustered out of service, having been since August 1 under command of Col. 
Samuel E. Chamberlain. After its muster out the regiment returned to Massachusetts, and in the latter part of 
November, 1865, was paid off and discharged at Boston. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



167 



Fifth Regiment Massachusetts Cavalry. 





■a 

c 

03 

s 


C 

3 


Companies. 


■*-» 

M 
O 

« 






A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


3 

o 
H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Enlisted men, . 
Died by accident and disease, — 

Officers, .... 

Enlisted men, . 
Died as prisoners, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, . . 
Total losses, — 

Officers, . 

Enlisted men, . 


- 


■■ 


13 
13 


10 
10 


15 
16 


14 
14 


4 
4 


1 

14 

15 


1 
12 

13 


11 
11 


2 

7 

9 


5 
5 


1 

8 

10 


, 8 
8 




5 
121 

2 
128 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1864. 

May -, Place unknown, 
June 15, Baylor's Farm, Va., 

1865. ' 

Brazos, Tex., . 



- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


2 


- 


1 


- 


- 



Note. — The 6th Mass. Cavalry was identical with the 31st Mass. Infantry, that regi- 
ment being organized at one time as cavalry and known under that name. It will be 
found among the Infantry regiments, as it began and ended its long, service on that footing. 



168 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



First Battalion Massachusetts Frontier Cavalry. 

Maj. Burr Porter. 







03 

c 

3 


Companies. 






A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


3 

o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 


1 


19 


100 


101 


100 


101 


100 


20 
502 


Total, 


1 


19 


100 


1 
100 


100 


1 

100 


1 

99 


522 


Enlisted men (included above) 


3 






Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 

Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 


20 
499 


x oral, . • • • ■ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


519 



The 1st Battalion of Frontier Cavalry consisted of five companies which were mustered into service Dec. 30, 
1864, and Jan. 2, 1865. The battalion left the State soon after its muster and was attached to the 26th New York 
Cavalry, and performed guard duty on the New York frontier. It was muBtered out June 30, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



169 



First Battalion Massachusetts Frontier Cavalry. 





2 


a 

3 


Companies. 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


»- 


- 


- 


- 


Missing, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


Totals, .... 




— 




— 


~ 


— 


— 


2 



170 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



First Regiment Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 
(1) Col. William B. Greene. (2) Col. Thomas R. Tannatt. 





in 

•a 

c 

03 

2 


oj 
c 

3 


•a 

a 
M 


Companies. 


n 

S 

c 
& 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


3 

o 


Number on regimental 
rolls, — 
Officers, 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


24 
20 

24 
20 


111 

111 

~~ ~ 


20 
20 


217 


227 


230 


201 


194 


203 


204 


176 


201 


204 


194 


195 


9 

9 


135 

2,495 


Totals, 


7 


4 
1 


6 
1 


8 
1 


3 

2 


6 
1 


3 

6 


7 
1 


3 


9 

1 


1 
1 


5 

1 


2,630 


Enlisted men (included 

above) commissioned in 

regiment. 
Enlisted men (included 

above) serving elsewhere 

within regiment. 


62 
16 


Totals, 


7 
210 


5 

222 


7 
223 


9 
192 


5 
189 


7 
196 


9 
195 


8 
168 


3 
198 


10 
194 


2 
192 


6 
189 


78 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 
Officers, 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


135 

2,417 


Totals, 




















2,552 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 1st Mass. Heavy Artillery was recruited as the 14th Mass. Infantry in the spring of 1861, most of its members 
being from Essex County; it was mustered into service July 5, and left the State August 7. Its first colonel 
■was a West Point graduate, and had served in the Florida Indian wars. It served for the remainder of the 
year in the defences of Washington. On Jan. 1, 1862, the regiment was reorganized, and became the 1st Mass. 
Heavy Artillery; 50 recruits Were added to each company, and two additional companies were formed. The 
regiment still served on garrison duty in the forts about Washington ; it was sent to the front August 26, and 
was present, though not in action, at the battle of Manassasf On Sept. 27, 1862, a battalion, consisting of two 
companies, was detached and served at Maryland Heights, where it remained until December, 1863, having on June 
10, 1863, lost 44 men as prisoners at Winchester, Va., and having taken part in a skirmish at Harper's Ferry about the 
same time. On May 17, 1864, the regiment, acting as infantry, joined the Army of the Potomac near Spotsylvania, 
Va., and entered with it into General Grant's campaign of 1864, being assigned to General Tyler's Division, 2d Army 
Corps. It took part in its first engagement May 19, 1864, on the Fredericksburg Road, near Ny River in the 
vicinity of Spotsylvania. Afterwards, as part of the 2d Brigade, 3d Division, it was engaged in the battles of North 
Anna and Cold Harbor, and, crossing the James River June 14, it took part in the assault on Petersburg, June 16 and 
22. The regiment remained actively engaged in the siege of Petersburg until April, 1865, and took part, after the 
fall of the city, in the pursuit of the Confederates. After General Lee's surrender it was stationed at the forts in 
the vicinity of Washington until it6 muster out in August. The regiment returned to Massachusetts August 20, and 
received its final discharge and payment at Boston, Aug. 25, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



171 



First Rpgiment Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 












C3 
•*-J 
</> 

•a 

5 

2 

E 


<v 

c 

3 


Companies. 


BO 

5 2 

ed 

C 
|3 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L M 


en 

3 

o 

H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


1 

1 

2 


8 
1 

9 


21 


18 


14 


14 


14 


15 


8 


14 


14 


29 


17 


24 




9 

202 


Totals, .... 

Missing in action, . 

Died by accident or disease, — 
'Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


1 
9 


9 


7 


1 
10 


15 


1 
14 


1 
7 


6 


6 


8 


9 


11 


2 


211 
4 

2 
113 


Totals, .... 


5 
36 


18 
45 


9 
30 


2 
27 


18 
47 


13 

43 


21 

37 


8 
28 


32 

52 


8 
45 


9 
35 


13 

48 


2 


115 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 

Total losses, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


156 

11 
475 






























486 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1864. 

May 19, Spotsylvania (Ny 

River), Va. 
May 22, Spotsylvania, Va., 
May 24, North Anna River, 

Va. 
June 1-5, Cold Harbor, Va., 
June 16-18, Petersburg, Va., . 
June 20-22, Before Petersburg, 

Va. 
Aug. 16, Before Petersburg 

(Strawberry 

Plains), Va. 
Oct. 2, Poplar Spring 

Church, Va. 
Oct. 2-29, Before Petersburg, 

Va. 
Place unknown, . 



March 
March 



April 



1865. 

25, Petersburg, Va., . 

31, Near Petersburg 

Vaughan Road, 

Va. 

2, Petersburg, Va., . 

Place unknown, . 



1 


4 

2 
1 

1 


6 

9 

1» 

1 
4 

1 


15 

1 

1 
1 


5 
1 
1 

6 
1 


5 
2 

7 1 
1 


3 

7 
2 

1 
1 


2 

8 
1> 

1 

2 
1 


4 

1 
1 
2' 

2 


9 

2 
1 

1 
1 


3 

4 
2 

1 
3 

1 


10 
2 

8 

9 
1 


12 
4 

1 


10 

10 
2 

1 
1 


- 



89 

3 
1 

4 
55 
12 



2 

4 

38 



Active also at Winchester, Maryland Heights, Totopotomoy and Hatcher's Run. 



1 Including missing in action. 



172 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Second Regiment Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 

(1) Col. Jones Fbankle, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





a 

m 

c 

« 

2 

s 


►3 


Companies. 




in 

■pa 

W I— t 

s 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


in 
« 
C 
H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


12 
13 

7 

7 

12 
6 


90 

_ 

I 

90 


218 


211 


239 


222 


233 


231 


338 


334 


221 


198 


147 


207 


18 


102 
2,830 


Totals, .... 


3 


1 
2 


4 
11 


3 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 
1 


3 


2 
1 


1 


2,932 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
regiment. 


27 
19 


Totals, .... 


3 

215 


3 

208 


15 

224 


3 
219 


1 
232 


3 

228 


1 
337 


1 
333 


2 
219 


3 

195 


3 

144 


1 
206 


18 


46 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


102 

2,784 


Totals, .... 








"1 " 


















2,886 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 2d Mass. Heavy Artillery was organized in the summer of 1863, and assigned to service in the department 
of Virginia and North Carolina. The 1st Battalion, consisting of Cos. A, B, C and D, left the State September 5 for 
New Berne, N. C, and was stationed at the forts in the vicinity of that city, being joined in November by Cos. E 
and F. The remaining six companies left the State Jan. 8, 1864, and were stationed at various forts in the same de- 
partment. In March, 1864, the headquarters of the regiment were at Norfolk, Va., where four companies were also 
stationed, the remaining companies still serving at forts in Virginia and North Carolina. Almost all the members 
of Cos. G and H, stationed at Plymouth under captains Ira B. Sampson and Joseph R. Fieke, were taken prisoners in 
the engagement, April 17-20, and the survivors, 35, were released and joined the regiment in the early part of 1865. 
In May, 1864, headquarters were changed to New Berne, N. C , and in August 375 recruits were added to the regi- 
ment, more than filling its .ranks, the surplus men being transferred to the 17th Mass. Infantry. In the autumn the 
organization lost many men by disease during the yellow-fever epidemic in New Berne and vicinity. In March, 
1865, five companies, under Lieutenant Colonel Sprague, took part in the engagement in the vicinity of Kinston, N. C, 
and were for a time on guard at Kineton. In June the regiment was for a time united at New Berne and remained 
there until July, then served in detachments at Wilmington, N. C, Smithville and Fort Fisher; on Sept. 15, 1865, it 
returned to Massachusetts, and was mustered out and discharged Sept. 23, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



173 



Second Regiment Massachusetts Heavy A 


rtil] 


ery 












in 

BO 

•a 

a 

a 

E 


3 


Companies. 


«5 
SB 

Is 

to 

« 
C 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


i 


K 


L 


M 


CO 

3 

o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Enlisted men, 

Missing in action, . 

Died by accident or disease, — 
Officers, .... 
, Enlisted men, 1 . 

Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 

Total losses, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


1 
1 


- 


25 

1 

26 


1 

10 

2 

13 


1 
17 

18 


1 
17 

3 
21 


1 
14 

15 


22 
22 


7 

7 

98 

112 


4 
2 

12 

66 

84 


16 

1 

17 


9 
9 


2 
1 
3 


3 
13 

16 


1 
1 


9 
11 

166 

172 

358 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1864. 

April 20, Plymouth, N. C, . 
Place unknown, 

1865. 

Mar. 8, Wilcox Bridge 
(Kinston),N. C. 
Place unknown, 












1' 


12 


- 


41 
3= 


12 








3 


- 


9 

5 

4 
1 



1 Including non-commisBioned staff. 



2 Including missing in action. 



174 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Third Regiment Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 

(1) Col. William S. Abert, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





C 
eS 

o 

5 


c 

3 


Companies. 


J5 

a> — 






A 


B 


C 


D 


B 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


BO 

3 

o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


8 
9 


86 


186 


155 


141 


149 


139 


157 


152 


161 


144 


162 


134 


148 


7 


94 

1,844 




2 
2 

J 


86 


3 


4 


3 
2 


6 


2 
1 


4 


3 
1 


3 


1 


3 


2 


1 


7 

1 


1,938 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
regiment. 


37 
4 


Totals, . . . ' . 


3 

183 


4 
151 


5 
136 


6 
143 


3 

136 


4 
153 


4 

148 


3 

158 


1 
143 


3 

159 


2 
132 


1 

147 


41 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


94 
1,803 


Totals, .... 


























1,897 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 3d Mass. Heavy Artillery was organized in the autumn of 1864, and was composed of the 3d and 6th to 16th 
Unattached Cos. of Heavy Artillery. Of these, the 3d and 6th to the 13th Cos. were mustered into service in 1863 : 
the 3d on Jan. 10, 1863, the 6th May 19, and the remainder were mustered on dates varying from August to Novem- 
ber, having served since their muster in the forts on the Massachusetts coast. On the organization of the companies 
into the 3d Heavy Artillery, the 13th (mustered in January, 1864), the 14th and 15th (in May), the 16th (in August), 
were added, and the regiment (with the exception of Co. I, which was on detached service) engaged iu the defences 
of Washington, being stationed at the forts in the vicinity of the city during its entire service. Co. I, recruited 
maiuly from Springfield, Mass., never actually joiued the regiment. Having been mustered Feb. 10, 1864, it sailed 
for Fortiess Monroe March 7, and was assigned to engineer duty under Capt.F.U. Farquhar, chief engineer, Depart, 
ment of Virginia; it was placed in chaige of the pontoon trains of the Army of the James, and was engaged through- 
out its term of service in all branches of engineer work, building bridges, roads and wharves, having charge of the 
pontoon bridge thrown across the James River during the siege of Petersburg and the bridges at Farmville, by which 
tbe2d and 6th Corps crossed in pursuit of the Confederates. A portion of the main regiment was mustered out June 
17, I860, the remainder serving until September 18. Co. I was mustered out September 26. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



175 



Third Regiment Massachusetts Heavy- 


Artillery. 












3 

to 

•a 

a 

a 
•a 
*o> 
S 


c 
3 


Companies. 


■si 

C 






A 


B 1 C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


3 

o 
H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Enlisted men, 

/ 

Died by accident or disease, — 
Enlisted men, 









8 


2 


3 


5 


4 


5 


» 

5 


3 


1 


2 


1 




2 
39 


Totals, .... 

Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 

Total losses, — 
Enlisted men, 




8 


2 


3 


5 


4 


5 


5 


3 


1 


2 


1 




41 

2 
39 


Totals 
























t 




41 



170 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fourth Regiment Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 

(1) Col. William S. King, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





id 

•c 

a 

c 

s 

.'a 


aJ 


Companies. 


•£■5 

o r 1 

CD cj 

3 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


BO 

o 

H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men,i . 


8 

7 

1 

1 

8 
6 


64 
64 


147 


148 


147 


147 


148 


146 


146 


147 


145 


147 


147 


147 




72 
1,769 




1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 
1 


- 


2 
1 


1 
1 


1 


- 


1,841 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
regiment. 


6 
6 


Totals 


147 


1 
147 


147 


147 


148 


146 


2 
144 


2 

145 


145 


3 

144 


2 

145 


1 
146 




12 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


72 
1,757 


Totals, .... 


























1,829 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 4th Mass. Heavy Artillery was organized by Special Order, War Department, dated Nov. 12, 1864, and was 
composed of the 17th to 28th Unattached Cos. of Heavy Artillery. These companies had been mustered into service 
in August, 1864, and were already assigned to duty in the defences of Washington. They had left the State before 
the middle of September, and were stationed on garrison duty at the forts near Washington. After the organization 
of the companies into the 4th Heavy Artillery their service remained the same, the regiment being stationed at 
Washington until its muster out, June 17, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



177 



Fourth Regiment Massachusetts Heavy Artillery- 


• 










SB 
CO 

•o 

p 

US 

s 


c 

3 


Companies. 


VI 

•a- 

is 

2 

S3 






A 


B 


C 


D 


B 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Officers, .... 

Died by accident or disease, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


— 


1 
1 


2 


2 




1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


2 




2 


5 




1 

20 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 

Total losses, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


2 


2 




1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


2 




2 


5 


21 

1 

20 






























21 



178 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



First Battalion Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 

(1) Maj. Stephen Cabot. (2) Maj. John W. M. Appleton. 





03 

w 

G 

•a 


a 
3 


Companies. 


EQ 

•O-S 

£1 

09 

a 

a 

P 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


CD 

3 

o 
EH 


Number on regimental 
rolls, — 
Officers, 
Enlisted men, 


3 


36 


253 


244 


241 


206 


161 


161 


19 


39 

1,285 


Totals, 


3 


36 


8 
245 


1 

243 


2 
239 


1 

205 


161 


161 


19 


1,324 


Enlisted men (included 

above) commissioned in 

regiment. 
Enlisted men (included 

above) serving elsewhere 

within regiment. 

Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 
Officers, 
Enlisted men, 


12~ 

39 
1,273 


Totals, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,312 



Co. A, formed early in 1862, was the first company raised of those which formed at a later date the 1st Battalion 
Mass. Heavy Artillery. It was organized for the purpose of garrisoning the forts in Boston harbor. Co. B. was 
organized in the autumn of 1862, and both these companies were stationed at Fort Warren, Boston harbor, serving 
there on garrison duty as the 1st and 2d Cos. Heavy Artillery until the spring of 1863. In April, 1863, these com- 
panies, with the 4th Unattached Co. Heavy Artillery, mustered April 22, were united to form the 1st Battalion 
Heavy Artillery. The organization was enlarged by the addition of the 5th Unattached Co. in June, 1863, forming 
Co. D, and by Cos. E and F, added in August, 1864. The battalion was on garrison duty at the forts in Boston harbor 
throughout its term of service, providing, by detachments, garrisons for many forts along the Massachusetts coast. 
Three companies were mustered out in June, 1865, and the remainder in September and October of the same year. 



Twenty- Ninth Unattached Company Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 

Capt. George W. Kennet. 



Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in company. 


5 


152 


157 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident and disease, . 

Died as prisoners, 

Total losses, . . . 


- 


2 


2 


Actual total of members of com- 
pany. 


5 


152 


157 




- 


2 


2 



The 29th and 30th Unattached Cos. Heavy Artillery, Mass. Volunteers, were mustered into the service of the 
United States in the latter part of August and the first part of September, 1864. They were ordered at once to 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



179 



First Battalion Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 





id 

CO 








Companies. 




CO 






c 

cj 

12 


c 

3 










co^ 

IS 

c 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


00 

3 

o 

EH 


Killed and died of wounds, — 






















Officers 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


Enlisted men, 






















Missing in action, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Died by accident or disease, — 
Officers, .... 






















Enlisted men, 






2 


3 


3 


3 


2 




2 


15 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, .... 






















Enlisted men, 






















Total losses, — 






















Officers, .... 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


■ - 


_ 


- 


_ 


Enlisted men, 






2 


3 


3 


3 


2 




2 


15 



Thirtieth Unattached Company Massachusetts Heavy Artillery^ 

Ca.pt. Samuel It. Bingham. 





Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in company. 


-.4 


146 


150 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident and disease, . 

Died as prisoners, 
Total losses, 




- 


- 


Actual total of members of com- 
pany. 


4 


146 


150 




- 


- 


- 



Washington, where they served on garrison duty in the forts which formed the defence of that city during the 
remainder of the year, and until their muster out of service at the close of the war, June 16, 1865. 



180 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



First Battery 

(1) Maj. Asa M. Cook (3 months). 



Massachusetts Light Artillery. 

(2) Capt. Josiah Porter. (3) Capt. Wm. H. McCartney. 





Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Totals. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men 


Totals. 


Number on rolls, — 

3 months 

3 years, 


9 

8 


107 
261 

3 
1 


116 
269 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident or disease, 
Died in Confederate prison, - . 
Total losses, .... 


- 


7' 

122 

1 


- 


Enlisted men (included above) 

commissioned in battery, — 

3 years, 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
battery, — 
3 years, 


3 

1 


- 


- 


- 


20 


Casualties by Engagements. 


1862. 

June 30, Glendale, Va., 

1863. 

May 3, Chancellorsville, Va., . 

1864. 

June 5, Cold Harbor, Va., 
Oct. 19, Cedar Creek, Va., 

Totals, 


- 


3 
1 

1 

2 


- 


Totals, 


9 

8 


4 

107 
257 


4 


- 


Actual total of members of bat- 
tery,— 
3 months, .... 
3 years, 


116 

265 


_ 


- 


- 


7 



1 One missing in action. 



2 Including 1 in 3 months' service. 



Active also at Gaines' Mill, Va., June 27, 1862; Malvern Hill, Va. ; Fredericksburg, Va., 2 wounded; Franklin's 
Crossing, June 5, 1803; Gettysburg, Pa.; Mine Run, Va.; Spotsylvania (Laurel Hill), Va., 2 wounded; Opequon, 
Va., 4 wounded ; Fisher's Hill, Va., 1 wounded. 

The First Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery was recruited in Boston during August of 1861, largely from 
the old Boston Light Artillery, or Cook's Battery, Maj. Asa M. Cook, which was mustered into the U. 8. service 
May 18, 1861, and was the only Massachusetts battery serving under the first call for troops. The First Battery left 
the State Oct 3, 1861, spent the winter of 1861-62 in camp about Washington, was present at the siege of York- 
town, Va., and at West Point. It entered the Peninsular campaign as part of the 1st Division, 6thX3orps, and took 
part in the battles of Mechanicsville and Gaines' Mill, Va.; it was active also at Glendale and Malvern Hill, Va.; 
engaged in the march to Fredericksburg, Va., in November and in the battle of Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862. 
The battery was in camp at White Oak Church, Va., duriDg the winter of 1863; engaged in the battle of Chan- 
cellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa., July 3, 1863, and Mine Run, Nov. 30, 1863; in winter quarters at 
Brandy Station during the winter of 1863-64; many of the men enlisted here for an additional term of service. 
The battery was engaged on the Po River on May 9, 10 and 11, 1864, and in operations in the Shenandoah Valley, 
also the battles of Spotsylvania Court House and Cold Harbor, Va. Having lost 40 men sent home during August, 
the battery was active in the battles of Opequon and Fisher's Hill, Va.; after this engagement the veterans not re- 
enlisted left the battery, while the remaining men participated in the engagement of Cedar Creek, and, after a 
short interval, 85 of these were transferred to the 9th Mass. Battery, there completing their term of service. The 
battery lost in all 55 horses in action. It was mustered out Oct. 19, 1864. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



181 



Second Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. 

(1) Capt. Ormand F. Nims. (2) Capt. William Marland. 





Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 


12 
12 


351 

6 

1 


363 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident and disease, . 
Died in Confederate prison, 

Total losses, .... 


-" 


2 
23 


2 








Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in battery, 


6 

1 


23 


Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within bat- 


- 


25 


25 


tery, 


1 


Totals, 


7 
344 


7 


Casualties by Engagements. 


Actual total of members of bat- 
tery, 


356 


1864. 

April 8, Sabine Cross Roads, La., 


- 


2 


2 



Active also at Port Hudson, March 13, 1863; Bayou Teche, La., April 13, 1863; Port Hudson, La., May and July, 
1863; Vermilion Bayou, La., Carrion Crow Bayou, La., Oct. 16, 1863; Grand Coteau, La., Nov. 3, 1863; Fort 
Blakely, Ala., April 2, 1865; Daniel's Plantation, Ala., April 2, 1865. 

The 2d Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery was recruited in Boston during April and May, 1861, and was the 
first battery sent forward for three years' service. It passed the year 1861 and to April, 1862, in garrison at Balti- 
more, Md., being engaged from time to time in many marches into Maryland and Virginia; then it left for Louisiana 
as part of General Butler's command, assigned to General Williams's brigade, and encamped at Baton Rouge, La., 
until it engaged in the Vicksburg expedition of June-July, 1862, retnrning to Baton Rouge for the engagement of 
August 5. During December of 1862, General Banks having succeeded to the command of the Department of the 
Gulf, the battery was assigned to General Grover, 4th Division, 19th Army Corps, and was in winter quarters at Baton 
Rouge until March, 1863, when it joined the expedition against Port Hudson, and later, after its return from the 
Teche expedition April-May, 1863, it went again to Port Hudson and was engaged in the siege operations there until 
the surrender. Another expedition into Louisiana with several engagements took place during October and Novem- 
ber, 1863. The battery was encamped at New Iberia and then at Franklin until March, 1864, when it engaged in 
the Red River campaign. There was no more serious fighting for that year; the summer was passed near New 
Orleans and the winter at Morganza, La., after which with Battery 5 it was sent by ship to Florida, then marched 
westward through the swamps to take part in the operations at Mobile. New and exhaustive marches followed the 
engagement there, and the battery suffered great losses in animals and equipments at this time. It reached Vicks- 
burg in June and remained there in camp until July 22, when it left for Massachusetts, and was mustered out at 
Boston, Mass., Aug. 11, 1865. 



182 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Third Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. 

(1) Capt. Dextek H. Follett. (2) Capt. Augustus P. Martin. 





0ffl " Men. 
cers. 


Total. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 


11 


250 
6 


261 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident and disease, . 

Died in Confederate prisons, . 
Total losses, 


1 


11 
11 


12 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in battery, 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within bat- 
tery, 


6 


11 


Totals, 


11 


6 

244 


C 


1 


22 


23 


Actual total of members of bat- 
tery, 


255 





Casualties by Engagements. 



1862. 

April 5, Yorktown, Va., . 

May 27, Hanover Court House 
Va., . 

June 28, Gaines's Mill, Va., 

Place unknown, . 

1864. 

May 11, Laurel Hill, Va., . 



- 


2 


2 


1864. 

June 3, Shady Grove Church, 
Va., 






1 


- 


1 


1 


June 20, Petersburg, Va., 


- 




1 


1 


1 


2 


July -, Before Petersburg, Va., 


- 




1 


- 


1 
2 


2 


Aug. 18, Weldon Railroad, Va., 
Totals, .... 


1 


11 


1 


12 



Active also at Malvern Hill, Va.; Antietam, Md., Blackford's Ford, Va., Sept. 20, 1862; Gettysburg, Pa., 6 
wounded; Wilderness, Va. ; North Anna, Va., 2 wounded. 

Present, not active at Chancellorsville, Va., and Mine Run, Va. 

The 3d Battery was recruited especially among the friends of Senator Henry Wilson of the 22d Mass. Infantry, 
to which regiment it was at first attached. It was mustered into the U. S. service Sept. 6, 1861, passed the winter of 
1861-62 in and about Washington and was active in the first move of the spring campaign of 1862 ; part of the battery 
was engaged at Hanover Court House, and it was in reserve at Mechanicsville, Va. Its next engagement was at 
Malvern Hill, Va., July 1, 1862, with no loss. One section of the battery made a reconnoissance to Leesburg, Va., 
Oct. 16-17, 1862, but as a whole it was not engaged in action again until the battle of Gettysburg, although it followed 
the 5th Corps in all its movements, was at Fredericksburg, Va.; on the "Mud March;" and in position, but not 
actively engaged, at Chancellorsville. Though the battery took active part in the many marches of the autumn of 
1863, it had no further engagements. It entered into camp for the winter at Bealton Station, Va., remaining there 
from December, 1863, to May, 1864. In-May, 1864, it was engaged at the Wilderness, Va.; in position at Laurel Hill, 
Va., from May 8 to 15 with heavy loss, Captain Martin being wounded through the neck; engaged at North Anna 
River, Va., May 23, and at Shady Grove Church, Va., from May 30 to June 3, 1864. The next engagement was 
before Petersburg, Va., where the battery was active almost continuously from June 18 to Aug. 13, 1864; it was 
engaged in the expedition against the Weldon Railroad, Va., Aug. 18-21, 1864, remaining at that place until the expi- 
ration of its term of service; the re-enllsted men and recruits were transferred to the 5th Mass. Battery, and on 
Sept. 16, 1864, the remainder of the battery was mustered out at Boston, Mass. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



183 



Fourth Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. 

(1) Capt. Charles H. Manning. (2) Capt. George G. Trull. 





Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 


11 


291 
3 

1 


302 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident and disease, . 
Died in Confederate prisons, . 
Totals, .... 


- 


' 1 
46 

47 


1 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in battery, 


3 
1 


46 


Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within bat- 


47 


tery, 


Casualties by Engagements. 




Totals, 


11 


4 
287 


4 










Actual total of members of bat- 
tery, 


298 


1863. 

Aug. 5, Baton Rouge, La., 


- 


1 


1 



Active also at Fort Blakely, Ala., April 2-9, 1865. 

The 4th Battery Light Artillery was composed chiefly of men from Essex and Middlesex counties. Almost im- 
mediately after its muster in October and November, 1861, it joined General Butler's New Orleans expedition, and 
was among the troops before Forts Jackson and Phillips at their surrender. The battery was encamped at Carroll, 
ton, La., until June 16, 1862, when a portion of it, under Lieutenant Taylor, engaged in action at Pass Manchac, La.; 
but the organization as a whole was not engaged until the battle of Baton Rouge, La., Aug. 5, 1862. It was stationed 
at Baton Rouge, La., until August 21 and then went into camp at Carrollton, La. On October 28, making its head- 
quarters at Fort Pike, La., it took part in several expeditions by water; it was engaged without loss at Bonfouca, 
La., Nov. 26, 1862, and again on December 23. The section which accompanied General Weitzel's brigade through 
the La Fourche district was engaged at Labadievllle, La., Oct. 25, 1862. In the spring of 1863 the battery took part 
in the siege of Port Hudson, being in action on May 27 and June 13 and 14. It was next engaged in the expedition 
to the Teche from Oct. 3 to Nov. 16, 1863, being engaged at Vermilion Bayou, La., October 9 and also on No- 
vember 11. In January, 1864, almost the entire battery re-enlisted as veteran volunteers, and were on furlough of 
SO days from February II, after which, on April 6, it was stationed at New Orleans, La. On the 5th of September, 
1864, it was transferred to Morganza, La., and on September 16 engaged in an expedition to Bayou Fordoche; a 
part of the battery, under Lieutenant Manning, engaged in a skirmish to the Atchafalaya River. On November 28 
it was transferred to Memphis, Tenn., and was in camp at Kennerville, La., and near Fort Gaines, Ala., until March 
17, when it entered into the movement against Mobile, in which it was engaged until Juiy 1. The battery was then 
ordered to Galveston, Tex., and remained in that vicinity until its return to Boston, where it was mustered out 
Nov. 10, 1865. 



184 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fifth Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. 

(1) Capt. Max Epfendorff. (2) Capt. George D. Allen. 

(3) Capt. Charles A. Phillips, Bvt. Maj., U. S. Vols. 



* 


Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 


14 


324 

7 


338 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident and disease, . 

Died in Confederate prison. 
Total losses, . 


1 


15 
11 


16 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in battery, 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within bat- 
tery, 


7 


11 


Totals, 


14 


7 
317 


7 


1 


26 


27 


Actual total of members of bat- 
tery, 


331 


.- 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1862. 

June 27, Gaines' Mill, Va., . 
Dec. 13, Fredericksburg, Va., 

1863. 

July 3, Gettysburg, Pa., . 



- 


2 


■ 2 


- 


1 


1 


- 


5 


5 



1864. 

May 12, Spotsylvania, Va., 

June 2-3, Bethesda Church, Va., 
June 8, Cold Harbor, Va., 
June 18, Petersburg, Va., 



1 
2 
3 

2 



Active also at Yorktown (Howard's Mills), Va., April 2, 1864; Malvern Hill, Va., 2 wounded; Manassas, Va., 
one wounded, serving with the 4th R. I.; Wilderness, Va.; Fall of Petersburg, Va., 4 wounded. 

Present, not active at Hanover Court House, Va., May 27, 1862; North Anna, Va., one wounded. 

The members of the 5th Battery were mustered into the U. S. service during September, October and November 
of 1861, and the organization went into camp at Readville, Mass., Nov. 14, 1861; the muster of the battery being 
completed December 10, it remained there until December 25 when it went to Washington, D. C, and on February 
13 moved to Hall's Hill, Va., and encamped there during the remainder of the winter. On the 4th of April it went 
forward to take part in the siege of Yorktown, Va., and was engaged on that day at Howard's Mills. It remained 
encamped in the vicinity until the evacuation of the town. It was next engaged at the battle of Gaines' Mill, Va., 
June 27, 1862, and at Malvern Ilill, July 1. After this, for a time, owing to loss of guns and horses, the men were 
attached to other batteries of the division, but In October the battery was reunited and joined the 1st division, 5th 
Army Corps, at Sharpsburg, Md. It encamped at Warrenton, Va , Nov. 9, 1862, and afterward made its head- 
quarters in the vicinity of Stoneman's Switch for the winter. In May, 1863, it was present at the battle of Chancel- 
lorsville, Va., and it was engaged at Gettysburg July 2 and S. After this battle the battery was on the march to 
Beverly Ford on the Rappahannock, and on November 7 it took part in the engagement at Rappahannock Station, 
Va., being engaged also at New Hope Church November 27 From Dec. 6, 1863, to May 1, 1864, the battery occupied 
winter quarters at Rappahannock Station. On May 5 it entered into action in the Wilderness, Va., being engaged 
at Spotsylvania May 12, and having made frequent changes of position with slight engagements during May, on 
June 2 and 3 waB in action at Bethesda Church, Va. It was engaged again June 18, 1864, in front of Petersburg; 
encamped at the Jerusalem Plank Road until July 29, 1864; was present at the explosion of the mine, Petersburg, 
July 30, and took part in the action at the Weldon Railroad, August 21. On the 3d of October the battery parted 
with 1 officer and 29 men, their term of service having expired, but the battery as a whole continued in service with 
the 5th Corps and remained in the vicinity of the Jerusalem Plank Road for the winter. Its final action was in the 
assault on Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865. On June 4, 1865, the battery left Virginia for Massachusetts, and on the 
12th of June was mustered out at Readville, Mass. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



185 



Sixth Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. 



(1) Capt. Charles Everett, Bvt. Brig. Gen., U. S. Vols. 

(2) Capt. William W. Carruth, Asst. Adjt. Gen., U. S. Vols. 



(3) Capt. John F. Phelps. 

(4) Capt. Edward K. Russell- 





Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 


12 


351 
4 

1 


363 


Killed and died of wounds, . 
Died by accident and disease, . 
Died in Confederate prison, . 
Total losses, 


1 


6 

47 


6 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in battery, . 


4 
1 


48 


1 


53 


54 


Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within bat- 


Casualties by Engagements. 


• 


tery, 


1863. 

June 28, Vicksburg, Miss., 
Aug. 5, Baton Rouge, La., . 

1863. 

April 12-13, Bisland, La., 
July 13, Bayou La Fourche, 

1 jU. . , • • • 


- 


1 
3 

1 

1 




Totals, .... 


12 


5 
346 


5 


1 
3 


Actual total of members of bat- 
tery, 


358 


1 
1 



The 6th Battery was mustered into the service of the United States Jan. 20, 1862, and left Boston Harbor Feb. 8, 
1862, on the "Idaho" and reached Ship Island, Miss., March 8, going into camp there. In the month of March a 
portion of the battery, under Captain Everett, engaged in an expedition to Biloxi and Pass Christian. The entire 
battery sailed for New Orleans, April 15, to take part in the operations against that city. After the occupation of 
New Orleans the battery was temporarily divided, one section under Lieutenant Carruth and the two others under 
Captain Everett, each detachment engaging in various expeditions in the vicinity of New Orleans, but the battery 
was reunited at Baton Rouge, La., for a time. From June 16 to July 26, 1862, two sections under Captain Everett 
were engaged in theVickBburg expedition; a section under Lieutenant Carruth remained at Baton Rouge during 
that time, twice engaging in skirmishes in the vicinity. The battery as a whole, in command of Lieutenant Carruth, 
was engaged at the battle of Baton Rouge, Aug. 5, 1862, and two weeks later encamped at Canollton, La. In 
October the battery was placed under command of General Weitzel and engaged in expeditions to Donaldson- 
ville, La., and Bayou La Fourche; it was in action at Labadieville, La., Oct. 27, 1862, after which it went into winter 
quarters at Thibodeaux, La. Being engaged at one time in an expedition on the Teche, it moved to Brashcar 
City, La., and then to Bayou Boeuf where it remained until April 2. The battery as part of the 1st Division, 19th 
Army Corps, engaged in the battle of Bisland, La., April 12 to 13, 1863. Ou May 17 it advanced to Port Hudson, 
La., remaining there until July 8, being engaged in the assault May 27. The battery was posted at Donaldsonville, 
La., from July 10 to 30, being engaged at Bayou La Fourche July 13. It was encamped at Thibodeaux, La., from 
July 30 to Sept. 25, 1863, and on October 6, as a four-gun battery, was sent to Berwick's Bay, where it lost an officer 
by disease. Leaving Berwick's Bay October 11 it was on the march through Franklin and Opelousas to New Iberia, 
La., where it went into camp, November 16, for the winter. The battery left camp March 3, 1864; nearly all the 
original members re-enlisted at this time, as veterans, and after the furlough of these men, April 13 to May 23, 1864, 
the battel y was reunited and was stationed at New Orleans during the year 1864. The original members by order 
of the War Department were mustered out of service Jan. 20, 1865. During the month of January, 1865, the battery 
gained 121 members by recruits and transfers; it remained at New Orleans until July 21 and, sailing on that day 
for New York, it reached Readville, Mass., August 1, and was paid and disbanded Aug. 10, 1865. 

Present also at Biloxi, Pass Christian, New Orleans, Brashear City, Houma, Labadieville and Port Hudson. 



186 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Seventh. Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. 
(1) Capt. Phineas Alonzo' Davis, Bvt. Col. U. S Vols. (2) Capt. Newman W. Stoker. 





Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 


13 


349 
10 


362 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident and disease, . 
Died in Confederate prison, 
Total losses, 


1 


5 
30 


5 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in battery, 


10 


31 


Enlisted men (included above) 


1 


35 


36 


serving elsewhere within bat- 

Lex Jj ••«••■ 


Casualties by Engagements. 






13 


10 
339 


10 




Totals 


1863. 

Jan. 30, Deserted House, Va., . 

1865. 

April 9, Fort Blakely, Ala., 


- 


4 
1 




Actual total of. members of bat- 
tery, ...... 


352 


4 
1 



The 7th Battery, organized as an infantry company, was among the number of those which first left the State. 
It was recruited in Lowell, Mass., was mustered into the service of the United States May 21, 1861, and sailed for 
Fortress Monroe May 22. It remained on provost duty at the fortress, its captain, Phineas A. Davis, being provost 
marshal until Dec. 25, 1861, when it was detailed on light artillery duty, and on March 17, 1862, the organization 
became the 7th Massachusetts Battery. It engaged, acting as infantry, in the advance on Norfolk, Va., May 10, 1862. 
On June 19, 1862, fully equipped as a battery, it went into camp at Newport News, moved to camp at Yorktown 
July 25, and on Sept. 29, 1862, marched to Suffolk, Va., and remained in camp there during the autumn, engaging in 
slight skirmishes from time to time. On Jan. 30, 1863, the battery engaged in action at Deserted House, Va. It 
was engaged at Franklin March 17, 1863. During the investment of Suffolk, Va., April 11 to May 3, the battery was 
present and was engaged on April 12, 14 and 15. On May 3 it took part in an action on the Providence Church 
Road ; was engaged in an expedition to Carsville May 13 to 21, one section under Lieutenant Farrar being engaged at 
Holland's House. On July 4, 1863, the battery was engaged at South Anna River ; moved to Fortress Monroe and on 
to Washington, going into camp there July 22; on duty at New York city from August 21 to Sept. 11, 1863; return- 
ing then to Washington it was stationed at Camp Barry, D. C, until Jan. 24, 1864. On January 24 it left the camp 
for New Orleans, moving then to Algiers and afterward to Alexandria; one section was stationed at Pineville. A 
portion of the battery engaged in an expedition against guerillas May 4, 1864; reunited and forming part of the 2d 
Division, 19th Army Corps, it was on the march to Morganza Bend on the Mississippi from May 11 to 22, being en- 
gaged near Mansura, La., May 16. The battery was encamped at Morganza, moving at one time to St. Charles, 
Ark , until October 23, when two sections changed camp to Duvall's Bluff, Ark., one section moving again to St. 
Charles. On January 15 the battery went to Kennerville, La. On March 18 it joined the 1st Division, 13th Army 
Corps, to take part in the operations against Mobile; it was on the march until March 27 when it engaged in action 
at Spanish Fort; from this time until April 8, when it was ordered to Fort Blakely, it was engaged a part of every 
day in action at the Fort, and on April 9 it engaged in the assault on Fort Blakely. On April 20 it embarked on an 
expedition up the Mobile and Alabama rivers; encamped near Mobile, Ala., May 16, and reached Galveston, Tex., 
July 3, moving July 9 to Houston, Tex. On October 1 arrangements were made for the return to Massachusetts, and 
on October 14 the battery sailed from New Orleans for New York . It reached Boston November 3 and was mustered 
out at Gallop's Island, Nov. 10, 1865. 

Present also at South Quay, Somerton, Providence Church Road, Holland's House, Mansura and the siege of 
Mobile. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



187 



Eighth Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery (Militia). 

(1) Capt. Asa M. Cook. 





Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 


6 


148 
1 


154 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident and disease, . 
Died in Confederate prison, 

Total losses, .... 


— 


1 
6 


1 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in battery, 


1 


6 


Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within bat- 


- 


7 


7 


tery, 


Casualties by Engagements. 




Totals 


6 


1 
147 


1 




Actual total of members of bat- 
tery, 


153 


1888. 

Sept. 14, South Mountain, Md., 


- 


1 


1 



Active also at Manassas, Va., and Antietam, Md. 

The 8th Battery was recruited by Asa M. Cook in response to the call of the President of the United States for 
troops, May 26, 1862, and on June 25 it left Boston for Washington. A serious railroad accident, in which 2 men and 
13 horses belonging to the battery were killed, caused a delay of two days at Trenton, N. J. Reaching the Capitol, it 
encamped several weeks at Fairfax Seminary. On August 11 it joined the 1st Division, 9th A may Corps, at Falmouth, 
opposite Fredericksburg, Va., and on August 17 was stationed seven miles south of Culpeper, Va. Part of the battery 
was stationed at Barnett's Ford, Va., from August 20 to 23, one section being engaged in a skirmiBh near Sulphur 
8prings, Va. It was engaged at the battle of Manassas Aug. 30, 1862, and at Chantilly, Va., September 1. On 
September 14 it was engaged at South Mountain, Md., losing 1 man killed and 4 wounded. At the battle of Antietam, 
Md., it was actively engaged during the day and evening of September 17 and until late in the afternoon of the 18th. 
It was encamped near the mouth of Antietam Creek until October 5, ordered then to Washington, D. C, it remained 
there until October 21 when it advanced and joined its division at Pleasant Valley, Va. On this march a detach- 
ment of the battery passing through Hyattstown, Md., surprised and captured a party of Confederate cavalry with 
recruits and horses. It engaged on the march through Virginia from October 26 to November 11, encamping during 
the time at Lovettsville, Waterford, Philomont, Rectortown, Orleans and Waterloo, remaining at the latter camp 
until it was ordered to Washington where it was mustered out, its term of service having expired, and left for Massa- 
chusetts Nov. 29, 1862. 



188 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Ninth. Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. 

(1) Capt. Achille De Vecchi. (2) Capt. John Bigelow, Bvt. Maj., U. S. Vols. 

(3) Capt. Richard S. Milton. 





Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 


11 


320 
4 


331 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident and disease, . 
Died in Confederate prison, 
Total losses, 


2 


12 

7 


14 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in battery, 


4 


7 


2 


19 


21 


Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within bat- 
tery, 


Casualties by Engagements. 


1863. 

July 2, Gettysburg, Pa., . 

1864. 

May 25, North Anna, Va., 

June 18, Avery House, Va., 


2 


9 

1 
2 




Totals 


11 


4 
316 


4 


11 


Actual total of members of bat- 
tery, ...... 


327 


1 
2 



Active also at Totopotomoy, Va.; Weldon Railroad, Aug. 18, 19 and 21, 1864, 1 wounded; Petersburg, April 1 
and 2, 1865. 

Present at Mine Run, Va. ; "Wilderness, 1 wounded ; Spotsylvania, Bethesda Church, Va.; Peeble's Farm, Sept. 
30, 1864; Hatcher's Run, Oct. 27, 1864, and during part of the Appomattox campaign. 

The 9th Battery, Massachusetts Light Artillery, was recruited in the summer of 1862 and mustered into the United 
States service on the 10th of August, the men being mostly from Boston and the neighboring towns. It left the State 
Sept. 3, 1862, and spent the winter of 1862 and 1863 near Washington, being in camp at Capitol Hill, D. C, until 
September 22, then occupying Camp Chase and Camp Barry, Va. From Nov. 19, 1862, to March 29, 1863, it was 
encamped at Fort Ramsay, moving to Centerville April 17 where it remained until June 25. It had no active service 
under its original captain, Achille De Vecchi, and was commanded by Capt. John Bigelow in its first day of fight- 
ing, on July 2, at Gettysburg, losing in half an hour 9 men. Lieutenant Erickson was killed on the field and 
Lieutenant Whittaker was mortally wounded, dying on July 20. The battery was with the 5th Corps in its advance 
to Petersburg, Va., in June, 1864, and was engaged with the Corps in many of the siege operations and movements, 
being engaged at Avery House June 18, with the loss of 2 men, and engaged again June 19 and 20. Having received 
from Battery 1 the men whose term of service had not yet expired, it participated in the closing engagements at 
Petersburg, followed in the retreat of the Confederates, and was mustered out at Gallop's Island, Boston harbor, 
June 6, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



189 



Tenth Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. 

(1) Capt. Jacob Henry Sleeper, Bvt. Maj., U. S. Vols. 

(2) Capt. J. Webb Adams, Bvt. Maj., U. S. Vols. 





Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


1 


Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 


9 


257 
3 


266 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident and disease, . 
Died in Confederate prison, 
Total losses, 


2 


8 

11 

3 


10 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in battery, 


3 


11 
3 


2 


22 


24 


Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within bat- 


Casualties by Engagements. 




1864. 

May 10, River Po, Va., . 
May 30, Totopotomoy (Jones' 

Farm), Va., 
Aug. 25, Reams's Station, Va., . 
Oct. 27, Hatcher's Run, Va., . 


2 


1 

1 
5 
1 




Totals 


9 


3 
254 


3 


1 

I 
5 
3 


Actual total of members of bat- 
tery, 


263 



Active also at Auburn, Va., Oct. 14, 1863, 2 wounded; Rappahannock Station; Mine Run; Wilderness; North 
Anna; Cold Harbor; Petersburg; Hatcher's Run, July 5-7, 1865; Fall of Petersburg; Farmville, April 7, 1865. 

The 10th Battery, mustered into service Sept. 9, 1862, was recruited in Boston by Henry H. Granger, afterward 
senior First Lieutenant of the battery and Brevet Lieut. Colonel, U. S. Vols. It left the State Oct. 14, 1862, 
but did not go into action for some time, its first months of service being spent in organization and drill in 
camp near Washington. It was ordered Dec. 25, 1862, to Poolesville, Md., where it remained through the winter. 
The battery joined the Army of the Potomac July 8, 1863, becoming part of the 1st Division, 3d Army Corps, and 
took itB part in the marchirjg and manoeuvring of the rest of the year, going three times into action that autumn ; at 
Auburn, Va., October 13; Kelly's Ford, November 7; and Mine Run, November 30. Upon the reorganization of the 
army in preparation for the campaigns of 1864, the battery joined the 2d Army Corps and fought with it through all 
the battles of that year. It was engaged in action at the River Po May 10; was at Cold Harbor June 2; in the 
vicinity of Petersburg, Va., June 16; at Deep Bottom, Va., July 28. It was engaged at Reams's Station, August 25, 
losing 5 men killed in action, 24 wounded and missing, and 34 horses killed; Captain Sleeper being wounded early 
in the day, the battery was under the command of Lieut. Henry H. Granger. From September 24 to October 24 it 
was in position in front of Petersburg; engaged at natcher's Run under the command of Lieutenant Granger, who 
with Lieut. Amos Smith was mortally wounded, both dying in hospital before the close of the month. Lieutenant 
Smith, of the 4th U. S. Artillery, succeeded Lieutenant Granger till tho close of the engagement. In 1865 the 
battery was engaged throughout the Appomattox campaign, being in action on February 5 and 7 at Hatcher's Run. 
After Lee's surrender it remained in the vicinity of Washington for a few weeks, and returning to Boston, was 
mustered out June 9, 1865. 



190 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Eleventh Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. 

(1) Capt. Edward Jenkins Jones, Bvt. Maj., U. S. "Vols. 





Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, — 

9 months, .... 
3 years, 


5 
7 


147 
190 

1 


152 
197 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident and disease, . 

Died in Confederate prison, 

Total losses, .... 


- 


2 

11 

1 
14 


2 


Enlisted men (included above) 

commissioned in battery, — 

3 years, 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
battery, — 


1 


11 
1 


9 months, .... 
3 years, 


14 


Totals, — 


5 

7 


1 

147 

189 


1 




9 months, .... 
3 years, 


Casualties by Engagements. 


Actual total of members of bat- 


152 
196 




tery,— 
9 months, .... 
3 years, 


1864. 

June 19-21, Petersburg, Va., 


- 


2 


2 



Active also at North Anna, Va.; Weldon Railroad, Aug. 18-19, 1864; Petersburg Siege, June 17, 1864, to March 
24, 1865; Fort Stedman, Va., March 25, 1865. 

Present throughout the Appomattox campaign. 

The 11th Battery, composed of men trom Boston and vicinity, served as the only artillery organization sent out 
under the 9 months' call for troops. It left the State Oct. 3, 1862, having been mustered into service August 25 at 
Readville, Mass., remaining there until its departure for Washington. It was employed during its whole term of 
service in picket duty about Centerville, Va., and was mustered out, at expiration of its 9 months' term of service, 
May 29, 1863. Reorganized, it was mustered in for 3 years' service, Jan. 2, 1864 ; and was almost continuously active 
throughout the remaining years of the war. Leaving the State for the second time, Feb. 5, 1864, the battery joined 
the 2d Division, 9th Army Corps, April 9, and was present at the Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; it was engaged 
at North Anna, Va., temporarily attached to the 2d Corps, and at the Weldon Railroad with the 5th Corps; engaged 
in the siege of Petersburg from June 17, 1864, to March 24, 1865. After its withdrawal from the lines on the latter 
date, the attack upon Fort Stedman, March 25, brought it once again into action. It followed the Confederate army 
to Appomattox after the fall of Petersburg, April 3; and returning to Massachusetts at the close of the war, was 
mustered out at Readville June 16, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



191 



Twelfth Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. 

(1) Capt. Jacob Miller. 





Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 




Offi- 
cers 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 


7 
7 


261 
3 


268 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident and disease, . 

Died in Confederate prison, 
Total losses, .... 


- 


24 


- 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in battery, 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within bat- 
tery, 


3 


24 


Totals, 


3 
258 


3 




24 


24 


Actual total of members of bat- 


265 





Active during the Port Hudson campaign. 

The 12th Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery was recruited and mustered into service hy detachments during 
the autumn of 1862, and left Boston by ship for New Orleans, Jan. 3, 1863, arriving at its .destination on February 3. 
It was on duty at Baton Rouge, La., during the month of March, and was mounted and equipped as cavalry for a 
short time in April; on duty on the Atchafalaya River near Brasbear City from April 17 to May 23; returning to 
New Orleans, it was on duty at various stations in the vicinity during the summer of 1863, and a detachment was 
stationed at Port Hudson during the siege. The battery was stationed at Port Hudson from October 15 until the 
close of its term of service. Foraging and reconnoitring expeditions took place by detachments on Dec. 31, 1863; 
March 16 and 26, 1864; April 26 and May 6; on the latter date a force of the enemy was met in advance on Port 
Hudson. Other expeditions took place on May 29, June 18 and August 24 ; during a part of the time detachments 
were mounted and equipped in service as cavalry. It suffered no loss by action during its service, but much by 
disease. It was mustered out July 25, 1865. 



192 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Thirteenth Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. 

i ,- 

(1) Capt. Charles H. J. Hamlin. 





Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 


7 


269 
2 


276 


Killed and died of wounds, . 

Died by accident and disease, . 

Died in Confederate prison, . 
Total losses, 


- 


26 


- 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in battery, 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within bat- 
tery, 


2 


26 


Totals 


7 


2 
267 


2 




26 


26 








Actual total of members of bat- 
tery, 


274 





Active during the Red River campaign ; Port Hudson campaign ; and engaged at Pleasant Hill and Cane River, 
La. 

The 13th Battery was recruited at Camp Meigs, Readville, Mass., and loft the State on the " De Witt Clinton" for 
New Orleans Jan. 20, 1863. On account of severe storm the vessel put in at Fortress Monroe, and the battery, 
having lost 57 horses during the passage, remained at Camp Hamilton, Va., for a few weeks, reaching New Orleans 
May 10. On June 6 it took up its position before Port Hudson in two detachments, one under Captain Hamlin, the 
other in charge of Lieut. T. W. Terry ; so stationed, it was on duty until the surrender, July 8; immediately enter- 
ing into camp within the works, it remained there during July and August, part of the time under command of Lieut. 
Ellis Mott; here it suffered much loss by disease, the command being reduced to 50 men. On August 31 it was 
temporarily attached to the 2d Massachusetts Battery, and with that organization took part in the Bayou Teche ex- 
pedition, October and November, 1863, engaging in frequent skirmishes and meeting the enemy at Franklin, La., 
October 2 ; at Carrion Crow Bayou, October 15, and again on November 2. It went into camp with the 2d Battery at 
New Iberia, La., moving with it then to Franklin; here on Feb. 17, 1864, it joined the 6th Massachusetts Battery, 
remaining with it until March 6 when it united with Battery L, 1st U. S. Artillery. Attached to this organization, it 
took part in the Red River expedition, meeting the enemy in a skirmish at Pleasant Hill, La., April 7, and again in 
a more serious engagement, April 9, in which 4 men were wounded and 1 taken prisoner; engaged also at Cane 
River Crossing. On July 1, 1864, the battery was relieved from its detached service and reporting to Captain 
Hamlin, again an independent organization, with a battery of 4 guns, went into camp at Grreeneville, La. Here it 
remained two months; then moving to Camp Parapet, La., it remained there during the remainder of its service, 
engaging in little action but that which fell to them in the routine of camp life. It was mustered out July 28, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



193 



Fourteenth Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. 
Capt. Joseph W. B. Wright. 





Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 


7 


187 
2 


194 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident and disease, . 
Died in Confederate prison, 
Total losses, .... 


1 


7 
5 
2 


8 








Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in battery, 


2 


5 

2 




1 


14 


15 


Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within bat- 
tery, 


Casualties by Engagements. 




1864. 

June 21-22, Petersburg, Va., 
Aug. 22, Before Petersburg, 
Va., . . 
1865. 

March 25, Petersburg, Va., 


1 


3 

4 




Totals, 


7 


2 
185 


2 


3 


Actual total of members of bat- 
tery, 


192 


4 



Active also at Spotsylvania, Va.; River Ny, May 8, 10, 12, 1864; North Anna, May 14-27; Totopotomoy, June 1; 
Bethesda Church, June 2-3, 1864. 

The 14th Battery, organized at Readville, Mass., and mustered into service Feb. 27, 1864, received its outfit of guns 
at Washington, April 24, and on the next day was ordered to join the 9th Army Corps, and left the capital to 
engage in the Wilderness campaign. The battery was encamped near Rappahannock Station until May 4; then 
moving forward, was pres'ent at the battle of the Wilderness, May 6; on May 10 it was engaged on the Ny River, its 
division commander, Gen. Thomas Greeley Stevenson, being killed, and was again in action there May 12, 16 aud 
18. From May 24-27 the battery was engaged at the North Anna River; engaged again at Totopotomoy, June 1; at 
Bethesda Church, June 2; Cold Harbor, Juue 6-12. It moved by forced marches to Petersburg and on June 17 
went into action there; it took active part also during the entire siege, entering into engagements June 21-24, July 
10-17, August 5 and 21, and on October 11. In September the battery was transferred to Reserve Artillery, Army of 
the Potomac, and on October 1 to 2d Army Corps, and went with this corps into winter quarters at City Point, Va. 
On January 15 it joined the 6th Corps; and on March 15, reunited to the 9th Corps, it took up its position in line at 
Port Stedman, Petersburg; one section was in action on March 25 under Lieut. E. B. Nye, who was killed in the 
engagement, the battery losing also 11 prisoners; both sections were actively engaged on April 1 and 2. After the 
fall of Petersburg the battery moved to camp at City Point, Va , and on to Fairfax Seminary early in May, remain- 
ing there until it left for Massachusetts. It reached Readville, Mass., June 6 and was mustered out June 15, 1865. 



194 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fifteenth. Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. 
Capt. Timothy Pearson. 





Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 


7 

7 


338 
2 


345 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident and disease, . 

Died in Confederate prison, 
Total losses, 


- 


26 


- 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in battery, 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within bat- 
tery 


2 


26 


Totals, 


2 
336 


2 




26 


26 


Actual total of members of bat- 
tery, . . . . i . 


343 





Engaged at Fort Blakely, Ala., April 2-9, 1865. 

The 15th Battery was recruited partly in Lowell and partly at Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, mustered into the 
service of the United States Feb. 17, 1863, and left BoBton March 9. It reached New Orleans., La , April 9, and 
went into camp there, spending a week at Brashear City in May, being at this time under command of Lieut. J. W. 
Kirk. On June 3 it was stationed at two small forts in Louisiana, and on December 29 it moved to Lakeport, La., 
and engaged in an expedition to Madisonville, La., from Jan. 2 to Feb. 15, 1864; removing to New Orleans, 
February 20, it remained encamped in the vicinity until October 17, when it moved to White River, Ark.; it was 
stationed at Duvall's Bluff for a time, going to Memphis, Tenn., November 27, where it remained until the close of the 
year. In February, 1865, the battery joined the 2d Division, 13th Army Corps, in Florida, and on April 2 took up its 
position before Fort Blakely, Ala., and engaged in the siege and capture, on April 9, being under command of 
Lieut. Albert Rouse. Returning to Mobile, it encamped at Fort Gaines until July 20, when it set out on its 
return to Massachusttts, reaching Readville August 1, and was mustered out Aug. 4, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



195 



Sixteenth Battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. 

Capt. Henry D. Scott. 





Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Totals. 




Offi- 
cers. 


Men. 


Totals. 


Number on rolls, 


5 


166 


171 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident and disease, . 

Died in Confederate prison, 
Total losses, . . 


- 


6 


- 








Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in battery, 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within bat- 
tery, 


- 


6 


Totals 


5 


166 


- 




6 


6 


Actual total of members of bat- 
tery, 


171 





The 16th Mass. Battery was organized at Camp Meigs, Readville, Mass., in March, 1864, and its last members 
were mustered in April 4. It left the State April 19 and arrived at Washington April 21. It joined the 22d 
Army Corps, and remained in camp in the vicinity of the Capitol until June, when it moved to Alexandria, Va. 
It was posted at Fort Kearny, Tenallytown, Md., July 11 and 12; and was stationed at Troy Road Barracks, 
Albany, N. T., September 7 to November 16. The battery returned to its old station at Washington November 19, 
and on December 6 it moved to Fairfax Court House, where it was posted in two sections, one at Vienna and one at 
Fairfax Station; here the battery remained through the winter and during the rest of its service, engaging in an 
expedition to Loudon Valley in March, 1865. On June 22 it returned to Massachusetts and was paid off and dis- 
charged July 13, 1865. 



196 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



First Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Robert Cowdin, Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(2) Napoleon B. McLaughlen, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Army. 





se 

US 
OD 

•a 
c 

3 


c 

3 


■d 

si 

K 


Companies. 


CO 

% ? 

a 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H I 


K 


D9 

o 

E-i 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


15 
17 


56 


28 


151 


159 


165 


141 


137 


141 


162 


163 


175 


151 


19 


71 
1,609 


Totals, .... 


2 


- 


- 


2 
2 


4 
1 


1 


3 
2 


- 
2 


1 
1 


4 
1 


4 


2 

1 


2 


1,680 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
regiment. 


27 
8 


Totals, .... 

Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


2 

15 
15 


56 


28 


4 
147 


5 
154 


1 
164 


5 
136 


2 

135 


2 
139 


5 
157 


4 
159 


3 
172 


2 

149 


19 


35 

71 

1,574 


Totals, .... 






























1,645 



1 Includiug non-commissioned staff. 



The 1st Mass. Infantry was composed largely of the 1st Regiment Mass. Volunteer Militia, under command 
of Col. Robert Cowdin, who became colonel of the 1st Infantry when the organization was completed. It was 
mustered in May 23-27 and was the firBt three-years regiment to arrive at Washington. Having left Massachusetts 
June 15, it encamped at Georgetown until the battle of Blackburn's Ford, in which it took a most active part. 
In August the regiment became part of General Hooker's Brigade, and was encamped at Bladensburg and after- 
wards at Budd's Ferry, Va , until the spring of 1862, when, as part of General Grover's Brigade, General Hooker's 
division 3d Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, the regiment moved to the Peninsula and was engaged on April 
26 in front of Torktown. After the battle of Williamsburg, May 5, the regiment marched to White Oak Swamp 
and encamped until June 25, when it engaged in the battle of Fair Oaks, just before the seven-days battles, in 
which the regiment took active part. At the close of the campaign the regiment encamped at Harrisou's Landing, 
until with its division it joined General Pope's army at Warrenton, Va., and went into action at Bristoe Station 
August 27, and suffered loss at the battle of Manassas August 29. Returning with General Pope's army after 
the battle of Chantilly, the regiment encamped at Fort Lyon near Alexandria, and until October 31 was engaged 
in the defences of Washington. About this time Gen. Joseph B. Carr took the place of General Grover as brigade 
commander. The regiment, detached from its division, was, during November, 1862, on provost duty at Fairfax 
Station, but took part with its division, December 13, in the battle of Fredericksburg, encamping afterward for the 
winter at Acquia Creek, Va. On Apiil 27, 1863, the regiment moved to participate in General Hooker's Campaign 
of 1863, losing heavily at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. After the battle of Wapping Heights, July 23, the regi- 
ment was placed in charge of the draft rendezvous at New York city until October 15. On that date the command 
was ordered to join its brigade at Union Mills, and was in the actions of Kelly's Ford and Mine Run, encamping 
at Brandy Station for the winter. On May 3, 1864, the regiment moved to take part in the spring campaign, and 
■was engaged in the battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania. These battles terminated the service of the 1st 
Regiment, which returned to Boston May 25, and was mustered out. Those whose terms of service had not yet 
expired were transferred to the 11th Mass. Infantry. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



197 



First Regimf 


>nt 


Massachusetts Infantry. 














ra 

CO 

■a 
c 

■C 


c 

3 


Companies. 


to 

s 

c 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I K 


OQ 

3 

o 


Killed and died of w r ounds, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 


7 


14 
4 


8 


9 


11 


6 


11 


12 


18 


7 


12 




8 
108 


Totals, . ■ • 


1 

1 




8 


4 


5 


3 

3 
12 


7 
18 


2 
14 


4 


9 


6 

1 
19 


2 


116 


Missing in action, .... 

Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


i 

1 
55 


Totals, 


2 
1 


7 


18 


16 


13 


16 


2 
24 


1 
17 


2 


56 


Died as prisoners, — 

Enlisted men 

Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


7 

9 
170 


Totals, 




























179 



Casualties by Engagements. 
















1861. 

July 18. Blackburn's Ford, Va., 
July 21, Bull Run, Va , . 

1863. 

April 26, Yorktown, Va., . 
May 5, Williamsburg, Va., 
June 25, Fair Oaks or Oak Grove, 

Va. 
June 30, Glendale, Va., 
Aug. 29, Manassas or Bull Run, 

2d, Va. 
Dec. 13, 14, Fredericksburg, Va., . 
Place unknown, . 

1863. 

May 2, 3, Chancellorsville, Va., . 
July 1-3, Gettysburg, Pa , . 
Nov. 27, Locust Grove, Va., 
Place unknown, . 

1864. 

May 12, Spotsylvania, Va., 


1 


1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


3 

2 

3 
1 
4 


1 
2 

1 
4 


1 
1 

1 

1 

4 


2 
1 

3 
1 

1 

2 
1 


1 
3 

1 
1 


1 

4 

3 
3 


5 

1 
4 

1 
1 


6 
4 

4 

2 
1 

1 


1 

2 

1 
2 

1 


5 
5 

1 
1 


1 


13 
1 

4 
10 

12 

19 
15 

3 

1 

12 

21 

1 

1 

1 
2 



Active also at Kettle Run, Aug. 27, 1862, and Chantilly, Sept. 1, 1862. 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



198 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Second Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. George H. Gordon, Bvt. Maj. Gen. U. S. Vols. '. 

(2) Col. George L. Andrews, Bvt. Maj. Gen. TJ. S. "Vols. 

(3) Col. Samuel M. Quincy, Bvt. Brig. Gen. TJ. S. Vols. 

(4) Col. "William Oogswell, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





<3 

C 

s 

"3 


c 

3 


•a 


Companies. 


V - 

.18 

VI ^ 

G 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


DO 

o 
E- 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


19 
17 


83 


24 


188 


172 


151 


159 


189 


164 


197 


164 


180 


148 


35 


102 
1,788 


Totals, .... 


10 


- 


- 


9 


2 
1 


8 


6 


1 


2 


5 
1 


3 


2 


2 

2 
146 


1,890 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
regiment. 


50 
2 


Totals, .... 


10 

19 

7 


83 


24 


9 

179 


3 
169 


8 
143 


6 

153 


1 

188 


2 
162 


6 

191 


3 
161 


2 
178 


35 


52 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


102 
1.736 


Totals, .... 






























1,838 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 2d Mass.. Infantry was recruited by Col. George Henry Gordon (a West Point graduate, who had served 
eight years as lieutenant in the regular army) in April, 1861, and began to be mustered into the service of the United 
States May 11. It left the State July 8, and joined the command of Major-General Patterson at Martinsburg, Va. 
On July 18, 1861, the regiment was ordered to Harper's Ferr}', and on the 23d Colonel Gordon was placed in charge 
of the town, General Banks succeeding General Patterson in command. In the autumn the regiment engaged 
in the movements on the upper Potomac, being stationed at Hyattstown, Md., Darnestown and Seneca Mills, and 
making its winter quarters near Frederick, Md. On Feb. 27, 1862, it moved towards Winchester, and the succeeding 
months were spent in movements in the Shenandoah Valley. On May 25 it engaged Jn the battle of Winchester, 
encamping afterward at Williamsport, Md. At this time Colonel Gordon was promoted brigadier general, U. S. 
Vols., and was in command of the 3d Brigade, 1st Division, Army of Virginia, of which the 2d Mass. Infantry 
formed apart, at the battle of Cedar Mountain. As part of the 12th Corps, the regiment fought at Antietam, Septem- 
ber 17, and encamped afterward in the vicinity of Harper's Ferry, moving on. Jan. 19, 1863, to Stafford Court 
House. April 27 it broke camp and moved forward to take its part at Chaucellorsville and Gettysburg. In August 
the regiment was stationed at New York, during the draft riots, returning to the front September 5. The regi- 
ment now became part of the Army of the Cumberland, and in the Atlanta campaign of 1861 formed part of the 20th 
Corps, under Major-General Hooker. On May 13, with the Army of the Tennessee, it took part in the march through 
Georgia. After the surrender of Atlanta the regiment was stationed as provost guard of the city and took pait in 
Sherman's march to the sea, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Morse It received at Raleigh, N. C, the news 
of the surrender of Johnston's army, and after participating in the grand review at Washington, May 24, it served on 
garrison duty there until its muster out of service, July 14, 1865. It received its final discharge and payment at 
Readville, Mass., July 26. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



199 



Second Kegiment Massachusetts Infantry. 












3 

00 

■a 

a 
a 


c 

3 


• 

COMP ANTES. 


09 

■of 

f« 

ci 

C 






A 


B C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


CO 

© 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 


3 


12 


23 


18 


23 


16 


9 


8 


19 


13 


25 


12 




15 

166 


Missing in action, .... 

Died by accident or disease,— 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


1 




9 


9 


10 


9 


9 

2 
20 


9 


6 


1 
8 


1 
8 


9 


- 


181 
2 

2 
87 


Totals, 


5 

1 


12 


1 
33 


27 


33 


25 


17 


25 


22 


1 
35 


21 


- 


89 


Died as prisoners, — 

Enlisted men, .... 

Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


4 

17 
259 


Totals, 




























276 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1862. 

May 25, Winchester, Va., . . 
Aug. 9, Cedar Mountain, Va., 
Sept. 17, Antietam, Md., 
Place unknown, 

1863. 

May 3, Chancellors ville, Va., 
June 9, Beverly Ford, Va., . 
July 1-3, Gettysburg, Pa., 

1864. 

May 15, Resaca, Ga., . . 
June 19, Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., 
July 30, Atlanta, Ga., . 
Place unknown, 

1865. 

Mar. 16, Averysboro', N. C, . 









1 


2 


2 




3 


2 


1 


3 






1 


5 


10 


3 


11 


3 


3 


1 


9 


2 


2 


7 


_ 


1 


- 


1 


2 


1 


4 


3 


1 


- 


3 


1 


- 


- 


™ 


*"" 


~ 


~ 


~ 


1 


™ 


*~ 


— 


1 


~* 


— 


— 


- 


1 


2 


5 


3 


1 


2 


- 


5 


4 


7 


3 


- 


1 


3 


10 


3 


3 


5. 


— 


1 


3 


3 


8 


2 


- 








1 


1 






1 






2 






- 


1 
























— 


- 


- 


— 


1 


- 


i 


_ 


_ 


— 


1 


_ 


_ 


- 




















1 






- 


2 


- 


3 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 



14 

57 

17 

2 



32 

1 

42 



Present also at Mt. Jackson, Front Royal, Fredericksburg and Peach Tree Creek. 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



200 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Third Begiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry (Militia), 

3 Months' and 9 Months' Service. 

Col. David W. Waedeop (3 months). Col. Silas P. Richardson (9 months). 




The 3d Infantry Mass. Volunteer Militia was composed of seven companies, six of them having been in existence 
prior to 1860, and the remaining one, Co. C, being the first company raised for the war in Massachusetts. In response 
to the President's call for troops the companies assembled in Boston, April 16, 1861, enlisted for three months in the 
service of the United States, and left the State April 18 for Fortress Monroe. Immediately on arrival the regiment 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



201 



Third Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry (Militia), 
3 Months' and 9 Months' Service. 





a 
XTi 
■d 

3 


o3 

c 

3 


Companies. 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I K 


L 


"a 
H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
9 months, — 

Enlisted men, .... 

Died by accident or disease, — 
9 months, — 
Officers, . . . . 
Enlisted men, .... 

Died as prisoners, — 
9 months, — 

Enlisted men, .... 

Total losses, — 
9 months, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


- 


- 


3 

3 


2 

2 




1 
1 


1 
1 


2 

2 


- 


- 


2 
2 
1 

5 


2 
2 


- 


2 

13 

1 

16 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1862. 

Dec. 10, Plymouth, N. C, 



•1 



was sent to assist in the destruction of the Gosport navy yard. Pour three-years companies were assigned to the 
regiment during May, but were afterwards transferred to the 29th Mass. Infantry. It formed part of the garrison at 
Portress Monroe until July, moving then to Hampton, Va., where it remained until its return to Massachusetts 
and its muster out, July 23. Many of the" members re-enlisted in the three-years regiments then forming. 

Recruiting for the 3d Infantry for nine-months service began Sept. 16, 1862, and on October 22 it left Boston for 
Beaufort, N. C, and went into camp near New Berne. During the autumn, detachments were on duty at Newport 
barracks and Plymouth, N. C, the detachment at the latter place engaging in the battle on December 10. The regi- 
ment was employed in the expedition to Goldsboro', in December, 1862, being present at the battles of Kinston and 
Whitehall and taking part in the action at Goldsboro'. It was on duty in the defences of New Berne during the 
remainder of its service, engaging in frequent expeditions and skirmishes. In April, 1863, it took part in the expedi- 
tion for the relief of Little Washington, N. C; in June, the regiment's term of Bervice having expired, it returned 
on the 16th to Massachusetts, and was mustered out June 26, 1863, at Camp Joe Hooker, Lakeville. 



202 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fourth Kegiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry (Militia), 

3 Months' and 9 Months' Service. 

Col. Abner B. Packard (3 months). Col. Henry Walker (9 mouths). 





id 

CO 

13 

c 

(3 


o 

3 


Companies. 






A 


B 


C 


r 

D 


B 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
3 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


7 
3 


27 


78 


34 


63 


77 


57 


73 


65 


76 


76 




34 
602 


Totals, 


9 
6 


31 


98 


96 


84 


96 


91 


79 


89 


91 


96 


94 


636 


9 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


40 
920 


Totals, 


7 
3 


27 


1 

78 


34 


63 


1 

77 


2 

57 


73 


1 
64 


76 


76 


- 


960 


Enlisted men (included above) 

commissioned in regiment, — 

3 months, .... 

9 months, .... 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment, — 

3 months, .... 

9 months, .... 

Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 
3 months, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


1 

4 

34 
601 




9 
6 


31 


97 


96 


84 


95 


89 


79 


89 


91 


96 


94 


635 


9 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


40 
916 


Totals, 








- 


















956 



The members of the 4th Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, commanded by Col. Abner B. Packard, assembled in 
Boston April 16, 1861, in response to the President's first call for troops, and on the 17th the regiment left the State 
for Fortress Monroe, and spent at the fortress and in the vicinity its three months of service. On May 27 it moved 
to Newport News and remained there during June, working at the entrenchments and engaged in scouting and guard 
duty; while there, five companies were detached and engaged in the battle of Big Bethel, June 10. The last week 
of its service was spent at Hampton, Va July 18 the regiment returned to Boston, and was discharged July 22, 
1861. It volunteered again under the call for Dine-months troops in August, 1862, and the companies were mustered 
in on dates varying from September 1 to December 16. The regiment left camp at Labeville, Mass., Dec. 27, 1862, 
reached Carrollton, La , February 13, and on March 7 was stationed at Baton Rouge, forming part of the 1st Brigade, 
3d Division, 19th Army Corps. It formed part of the land forces in reserve at Port Hudson, March 14, when Banks 
united with Admiral Farragut in the expedition to gain possession of the Mississippi, and returned with the army to 
Baton Rouge, moving afterward to Brashear City. It engaged in the attack on Fort Bisland, April 11-13, and joined 
in the pursuit of the Confederates as far as Franklin. On its return it was stationed at Brashear City while Banks 
was engaged in the march to Alexandria. May 30 it joined the army before Port Hudson, and took part in the siege, 
two companies (under Captain Bartlett, who waB killed in the action) leading in the assault of June 14. After the 
surrender the regiment was stationed on garrison duty at the fort until the termination of its service. It returned to 
Boston Aug. 17, 1863, and was mustered out at Lakeville, Mass., Aug. 28, 1863. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



203 



Fourth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry (Militia), 
3 Months' and 9 Months' Service. 





id 

c 

a 

2 


o 

c 

3 


Companies. 






A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I K 


CO 

3 

o 
H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
3 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 

9 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


- 


1 


3 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


1 


4 


1 
1 

12 




- 


1 


13 
16 


10 

11 


13 
13 


12 
12 


11 
11 


17 
19 


10 
11 


6 

1 

6 


21 
22 


11 
15 


13 


Died by accident or disease, — 
3 months, — 

Enlisted men, 

9 months, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 

Died as prisoners, — 
3 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 

9 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 

Total losses, — 
3 months, — 

Enlisted men, 

9 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


124 

1 

1 
136 


Totals, 






















137 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1861. 

June 10, Big Bethel, Va., 



1863. 

June 14, Port Hudson, La., 
June 23, Brashear City, La., 



- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 




1 


3 


1 








2 




_ 


1 


4 


















1 









12 

1 



204 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fifth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia), 
3 Months', 9 Months' and 100 Days' Service. 
(1) Col. Samuel C. Lawrence (3 months). 

(2) Col. George H. Pierson (9 months and 100 days). 





id 

a. 

09 

•a 

E 


3 


Companies. 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


go 

a 

O 

E- 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
3 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


13 
5 


40 


90 
75 


76 
93 


80 


75 


80 


71 
91 


78 


69 


76 


71 


53 
771 


Totals, 


8 
4 

7 
4 

13 
5 


30 
30 

40 


96 


85 


97 


98 


98 


97 


79 


824 


9 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


38 
913 


Totals, 


85 


87 


91 


87 


95 


94 


98 


81 


88 


93 


951 


100 days,— 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


37 
903 


Totals, 


1 

1 

89 


1 

1 

1 
1 

75 


1 
1 

80 


75 


80 
97 


r 
i 

71 

~~ *> 

90 


1 

1 

2 

^8 


69 


.76 


1 
1 

71 

79 




Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment, — 
3 months, 
9 months, 
100 days 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment, — 

3 months, 
9 months, 
100 days, .... 

Totals, — 

3 months, 
9 months, 
100 days, .... 


1 
1 
1 

1 
2 
2 

2 
3 
3 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 
3 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


53 
769 


Totals, 

9 months, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


8 
4 


30 


75 


92 


95 
91 


85 


95" 


i 


97 


822 

38 
910 


Totals, 


7 
4 


30 


85 


87 


87 


95 


-t 1 
94 


96 


81 


88 


92 


948 


100 days, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 


37 
900 


Totals, 




















937 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



205 



Fifth. Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia), 
3 Months', 9 Months' and 100 Days' Service. 







a 

CO 

■a 
B 
ct) 


3 


Companies. 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


1 o 


Killed and died of wound 
3 months, — 
Officers, . 
Enlisted men, 

Missing in action, — 
3 months, — 
Officers, . 
Enlisted men, 

Died by accident or disea 
3 months, — 

Officers, . 

Enlisted men, 
9 months, — 

Officers, . 

Enlisted men, 
100 days,— 

Officers, . 

Enlisted men, 

Total losses, — 
3 months, — 

Officers, . 

Enlisted men, 
9 months, — 

Officers, . 

Enlisted men, 
100 days, — 

Enlisted men, 


s,— 
se, — 


- 


- 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 

1 


1 

1 
1 

1 


1 

2 
2 

1 

2 
2 


4 

1 
2 
1 

5 
2 
1 


2 
2 


1 

2 
1 

1 

2 
1 


1 

1 
2 
1 

2 
2 
1 


1 

2 

1 
2 


8 

1 

2 

13 

8 

11 
13 

8 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1861. 

July 21, Bull Run, Va , 



_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


4 


- 


1 


1 


_ 



The members of the 5th Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, in response to the President's call for troops, 
assembled in Boston April 19, 1861; and, their numbers increased by one company from the 1st Infantry, M. V. M., 
and four from the 7th, the regiment left the State April 21, and was mustered into the United States Bervice May 1, 
at Washington. It remained in camp near Alexandria, Va., until July 16, when it took up the line of march to 
Centreville, and on the 21st took part in the battle of Bull Run. After the battle the regiment remained at Wash- 
ington until its return to Massachusetts for muster out, July 30. Its term of service having expired, July 19, when 
at the front, it had volunteered for the succeeding days of service. At the call for nine-months troops in August, 
1862, the officers of the 5th Infantry tendered to the government the services of the regiment, and on Oct. 22, 1862, 
it left the State for New Berne, N. C, five of the companies being newly recruited. Remaining in camp only a few 
days after arrival, it set ■- ■' on November 3 on an expecTitionito Williamston, N. C , and in December, 1862, took 
part in the Goldsboro* expedition, engaging in the battles of Kinston, Whitehall and Goldsboro'. It also took part, 
in April, 1863, in two expedition" *or the relief of Washington, N. C, and later in a reconnoissance toward Kinston 
and an expedition to Cove Creek, N. C. On June 20, 1863, the regiment's term of service expired, and, reaching 
Massachusetts June 26, it was mustered out at Camp Wenham, July 2. 

In the summer of 1864 the 5th Infantry was again mustered into the service of the United States, and left Massa- 
chusetts for 100 days, which it spent in camp at Fort McHenry, near Baltimore, several companies being detached 
for duty at various- forts in Maryland. Its service was ended Nov. 1, 1864, and it was mustered out at Readville, 
Mass., Nov. 16, 1864. 



206 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Sixth. Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia), 
3 Months', 9 Months' and 100 Days' Service. 

(1) Col. Edward F. Jones, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. (3 months). 

(2) Col. Albert S. Follansbee (9 months and 100 days). 





4a 

C3 
to 

■a 
c 
a 

2 


c 


S3 


Companies. 


Q.+J 
S * 

a 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


O 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
3 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 


9 

5 


46 


16 


49 


71 


52 


48 


46 


58 




48 


49 


64 


63 


97 


55 

666 


Totals, 

9 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 


10 

7 


36 




95 

97 


72 
98 


98 


87 


73 


84 


91 


94 


97 


79 






721 

46 

877 


Totals, 

100 days,— 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 


9 
4 


30 




98 


98 


94 


97 


94 


85 


87 


91 






923 

39 

943 


Totals, 

Enlisted men 1 (included above) 

commissioned in regiment, — 

3 months, . . . 

9 months, 

100 days, .... 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
regiment, — 
3 months, 

100 days, .... 

Total, — 

3 months, 
9 months, 

Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 
3 months, — 
Officers, 
Enlisted men, 1 


1 

1 

9 
5 

10 
6 


46 


16 


1 

2 

1 
2 

48 


1 

1 

1 
1 

70 


52 


48 


1 

2 
46 


1 

1 

1 

58 


91 


48 
94 


1 

1 
49 


1 

1 
1 

63 


63 


2 

2 
95 


982 

4 
7 
1 

1 

2 

5 
9 
1 

55 

661 


Totals, 

9 months, — 
Officers, 
Enlisted men, 1 


36 




93 


71 


98 


87 


71 


83 


96 


78 






716 

46 

868 


Totals, . . 

100 days,— 
Officers, 
Enlisied men, 1 


9 
4 


30 




97 


98 


98 


98 


94 


96 


94 


85 


87 


91 






914 

39 
942 


































981 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



207 



Sixth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia), 
3 Months', 9 Months' and 100 Days' Service. 



. 


id 
s 

en 

•o 

C 
a 

s 


9 

a 
13 


Companies. 






A 


B 


O 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L, 


to 

o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
3 months, — Enlisted men, 
9 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . . 


- 


2 


- 


4 


2 


3 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


4 


2 
8 


Totals 


- 


2 


3 
3 


2 
1 

6 


1 
3 

6 


3 
1 

3 
3 


3 
3 


1 
1 


1 
1 


2 

1 


1 
1 

1 

1 


1 


- 


10 


Died by accident or disease, — 
9 months, — Enlisted men, 
100 days, — Enlisted men, 

Died as prisoners, — 

9 months, — Enlisted men, 

Total losses, — 

3 months, — Enlisted men, 
9 months, — 

Officers, .... 

Enlisted men, 


14 

7 

3 
4 


2 
25 


Totals 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


2 


1 


1 


- 


27 


100 days, — Enlisted men, 


7~ 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1861. 

April 19, Baltimore, Md., 
1863. 

Dec. 12, Tanner's Ford, Va., 

1863. 

Jan. 30, Deserted House, Va., 
May 15, Carsville, Va., 



- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


4 


2 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 



The services of the 6th Infantry, M. V. M., were tendered to the State of Massachusetts by its officers Jan. 21, 
1861, and on the 15th of April, 1861, the regiment was called into service by Governor Andrew. Its members were 
residents of Middlesex, Essex, Suffolk and Worcester counties, its colonel being Edward F. Jones of Pepperell. 
The regiment left Boston for Washington via New York and Philadelphia, April 17, 1861, being enthusiastically 
greeted in these two cities. It arrived at Baltimore on the 19th of April, when its passage across the city was inter- 
cepted by a mob, and a detachment, companies C, I, L and D, under Capt. Albert S. Follansbee, had four men 
killed and thirty-six wounded, the first men to fall in the civil war of 1861-1865. The regiment was the first armed 
regiment to reach Washington and was mustered into United States service April 22, 1861, and having its head- 
quarters at the Relay House, near Baltimore, took part, in May, in the occupation of Baltimore, and engaged in 
June in guarding the railroads in the vicinity of Washington. Its term of service expired July 22, 1861, but at the 
request of General Banks it volunteered for further service and remained on duty until July 29, when it was relieved, 
and returning to Maspachusetts, was mustered out of service Aug. 2, 1861. 

In response to the call for troops in 1862, the regiment was mustered in for its nine months' service, under Col 
Albert S. Follansbee, on varying dates from August 31 to Sept. 8, 1862. Twenty. seven of the commissioned officers 
had served under the three months' enlistment and seven companies remained the same. The command proceeded to 
Fortress Monroe September 13 and spent its term of service in the vicinity, engaging in action at Deserted House, 
Va., Jan. 30, 1863, and in the siege of Suffolk in May. It was mustered out at Lowell, Mass., June 3, 1863. 

The 6th regiment was mustered in for its one hundred days' service from .July 14 to 19,1864, under Col. Albert 
S. Follansbee, with but few changes among the field and staff officers; the regiment left Readville for Washington 
July 20, 1864, and remained on duty at Arlington Heights until August 21, going from that place to Fort Delaware, 
Del. It was mustered out of service at Readville, Mass., Oct. 27, 1864. 



208 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Seventh Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Daeius N. Couch, Maj. Gen. "U. S. Vols. 

(2) Col. Nelson H. Davis, Brig. Gen. U. S. Army. 

(3) Col. Joseph Wheelock. 





in 

•a 

5 

E 


13 


c 
P3 


Companies. 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


B 

C 

H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


14 
16 


64 


20 


120 


109 


102 


114 


105 


109 


105 


104 


104 


113 


78 
1,121 


Totals, 


9 


- 


- 


7 
1 


3 


3 
1 


2 


2 


3 


1 
2 


3 


5 
1 


4 
1 


1,199 


Enlisted men (included above) com- 
missioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) serv- 
ing elsewhere within regiment. 


42 
6 


Totals, 


9 

14 

7 


64 


20 


8 
112 


3 
106 


4 

98 


2 
112 


2 
103 


3 
106 


3 

102 


3 
101 


6 
98 


5 

108 


' 48 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


78 
1,073 






























1,151 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 7th MaBs. Infantry was recruited by Col. (afterward general) Darius Nash Couch, a West Point graduate, who 
had served nine years in the regular army. It was composed mainly of men from Bristol County and was mustered 
into service at Taunton, Mass., June 15, 1861. It left the State for Washington July 12, and remained engaged in 
its defences for nearly a year. On March 25, 1862, it left camp for Fortress Monroe to engage in the Peninsular 
campaign. It took part in the siege of Yorktown and the battles of "Williamsburg, Fair Oaks and Oak Grove, 
engaging afterwards in the seven days' retreat. Remaining at Harrison's Landing until August 16 it moved then to 
Yorktown, and on August 31 arrived at Alexandria, on the way to join General Pope's forces in Virginia, uniting 
with them at Chain Bridge, Va., September 3. It took part in the movement against South Mountain and Antietam, 
and was actively engaged at Frederickshurg December 13, going afterwards into winter quarters near White Oak 
Church, and engaging with the rest of the army in the " mud march" of January, 1863. At Cbancellorsville, as 
part of General Sedgwick's division, the regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Harlow, led the assault on Marye's 
Heights May 3, its colonel, Thomas Denton Johns, heing in command of the storming column. It took part 
without loss at Gettysburg and marched with the Army of the Potomac to the Rapidan, engaging in November in 
the Mine Run campaign. Its winter quarters were at Brandy Station, Va., from whence an expedition was made to 
Robertson's River in February, 1864. In May, 1864, the regiment, as part of the 4th Brigade, General Getty's 
Division, 6th Corps, took part in the battles of the Wilderness, suffering great loss May 5 and 6. It was active at 
Bpotsylvania Court House and on duty constantly during the days of the battle of Cold Harbor, moving with the 
army towards the James River June 12. On June 15, the regiment's term of service having expired, it withdrew 
from the front and returned to Washington ; reaching Massachusetts June 20, it was mustered out at Taunton, 
July 6, 1864. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



209 



Seventh Eegiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(4) Col. David A. Russell, Bvt. Maj. Gen. U. S. Army. 

(5) Col. Thomas D. Johns, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





ta 
























to 










Companies. 














•a 
5 


























1 


















to 




% 


V 


A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


« 




fa 


J 






















fcn 


Killed and died of wounds, — 


- 


4 


8 


5 


8 


11 


6 


12 


4 


4 


6 


6 


4 

70 
























74 


Died by accident or disease, — 






7 


5 


3 


13 


7 


8 


6 


4 


5 


6 


64 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


1 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 


- 


4 


16 


10 


11 


26 


14 


20 


12 


8 


11 


12 


4 
140 


























144 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1862. 

May 5, Williamsburg, Va., 
June 25, Oak Grove, Va., . 
Place unknown, 



1863. 

May 3, Chancellorsville (Marye's 
Heights and Salem Heights) , 
Va. 



1864. 

May 5-6, "Wilderness, Va., . 
May 8, Spotsylvania, Va.,. 
June 3-12, Cold Harbor (Bethesda 
Church), Va. 
Place unknown, 



35 



28 
2 
2 



Present also at White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Williamsport, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg 

and North Anna River. 



210 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Eighth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia), 
3 Months', 9 Months' and 100 Days' Service. 

(1) Col. Timothy Munroe (3 months) . 

(2) Col. Edward W. Hincks, Bvt. Brig. Gen. TJ. S. Army (3 months). 





«3 

$ 

■a 

e 

0) 

2 
5 


3 


Companies. 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


m 

o 

Eh 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
3 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 


10 
3 


41 


75 


54 


. 60 


65 


68 


86 


61 


48 


65 


72 


51 
657 


Totals, 


8 

4 


32 


92 
98 

75 


83 


84 


91 


96 


93 


98 


76 


96 

80 


71 
81 


708 


9 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 


40 

884 


Totals, 


8 
6 


30 


84 

54 


93 


87 


91 


81 


83 


84 


924 


100 days, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men,' 


38 

868 


Totals, 


10 
3 


41 


1 
2 

1 
2 

59 


1 
1 

1 
1 

64 


1 
1 

68 


3 

3 

86 


1 

1 

2 

61 


48 


2 
1 

2 
1 

65 


1 

1 

71 


906 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment, — 

9 months, 
100 days, .... 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
regiment, 
3 months, 
9 months, 
100 days, .... 

Totals, — 

3 months, 
9 months, 
100 days 

Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 
3 months, — 
Officers, . . . .' 
Enlisted men, 1 


1 
2 
2 

2 
1 
7 

3 
3 
9 

51 
654 




8 
4 


32 


- 

92 


83 


84 


91 


95 


93 


98 
81 


76 


94 


71 


705 


9 months, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 


40 
881 




8 
6 


30 


98 


84 


91 


86 


91 


78 


84 


79 


81 


921 


100 days, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, 1 


38 
859 


Totals,. 


























897 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



211 



Eighth Kegiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia), 

3 Months', 9 Months' and 10O Days' Service. 

(3) Col. Frederic J Coffin (9 months). (4) Col. Benjamin F. Peach, Jr. (100 days). 









00 

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C 
03 

2 

r v 

E 


<0 

c 

t-n 


Companies. 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


GD 

"3 
o 
H 


Killed and died of wo 
3 months, — 
Officers, . 
Enlisted men, . 
9 months, — 

Enlisted men, . 
100 days,— 
Officers, . 
Enlisted men, . 

Died by accident or di 
3 months, — 
Officers, . , 
Enlisted men, . 
9 months, — 

Enlisted men, 
100 days, — 
Officers, . 
Enlisted men, . 

Died as prisoners, — 
3 months, — 

Officers, . 

Enlisted men, 
9 months, — 

Officers, . 

Enlisted men, 
100 days,— 

Enlisted men, 


unds 
sease 


> 

> 


- 


1 


- 


2 


2 
1 


- 


- 


1 


2 
1 


- 


- 


2 
2 


1 

9 
4 



Orders for the mustering of the 8th Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, were received April 15, 1861, and the regi- 
ment left the State April 18, one company from the 7th Infantry, M. V. M., and one from the 1st Battalion Infantry 
being added to its numbers. In command of Col. Timothy Munroe it proceeded to Washington by way of Annapolis, 
four days being spent at the latter place, and here Co. K was detached for duty at Fort McHenry, Md., and a detach- 
ment of the regiment also engaged in conveying the frigate " Constitution " to New York. The remainder of the 
regiment reached Washington April 26 and was mustered into the United States service April 30; it was ordered 
into camp at the Relay House May IK While here Colonel Munroe resigned on account of illness and was suc- 
ceeded by Edward W. Hincks. On July 3 it moved to Baltimore, remaining there until the termination of its 
Bervice, July 29. In response to the call for nine months' troops, which was made in the autumn of 1862, the 
regiment again went into service, and November 25 it left the State for North Carolina, encamping at New Berne 
upon its arrival. Two companies were detached in December and served at Roanoke Island, two companies joining 
them in February. On June 28, 1863, the regiment was ordered to Massachusetts to be mustered out, but on the 
30th was sent to Baltimore; on July 7 it marched to Maryland Heights, and on the 12th, joiued by the detached 
companies from Roanoke Island, it moved with the Army of the Potomac to the Rappahannock. On July 29 the 
regiment returned to Massachusetts and was mustered out August 7. In July, 1864, it was mustered in for one 
hundred days ; this term of service it spent in camp near Baltimore, Md., doing guard and hospital duty. It prepared 
for its return to Massachusetts on October 28; and Nov. 10, 1864, it was mustered out of service for the last time. 



212 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Ninth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Thomas Cass-. 

(2) Col. Patrick R. Guinet, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(3) Col. Cromwell G. Rowell. 





ta' 

EO 

■o 
5 

S 


13 




Companies. 


00 

l! 

as 
i* 

a 
5 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


o 

H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


17 
19 


59 


23 


172 

2 


166 


168 


163 


157 


149 


164 


156 


159 


150 


5 


76 
1,651 




13 

13 

17 
6 


- 


- 


3 


4 


4 
1 


4 


4 


2 
1 


3 


3 


1 


1,727 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


43 

2 


Totals, .... 


59 


23 


2 
170 


3 
163 


4 
164 


5 
158 


4 
153 


4 
145 


3 
161 


3 

153 


3 
156 


1 
149 


5 


45 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


76 
1,606 


Totals, .... 






















1,682 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 

The 9th Mass. Infantry was recruited in April, 1861, by Col. Thomas Cass who early in the month requested the 
Governor for permission to form an Irish regiment for three years' service, thus making it the first Irish regiment 
formed in Massachusetts; in consideration of which it carried an Irish flag as well as the national and State colors. 
Its members were recruited from all parts of the State; and encamping at Long Island, Boston Harbor, through May 
and part of June, it was mustered into service June 11, 1861, and left the State for Washington June 25. The regi- 
ment encamped at Arlington Heights until October, moving then to Miner's Hill, Va., where it remained during the 
winter of 1861-62. On March 21, 1862, it embarked for Fortress Monroe to engage In the Peninsular Campaign, and 
took active part in the siege of Yorktown. After the evacuation of the city the regiment moved, by the way of West 
Point and Cumberland, to White House, Va , and on May 25 encamped at Gaines's Mill, taking part in the battle of 
Hanover Court House, Va., May 27. Returning, it remained in camp afterward until June 26 when it took part in 
the battle of Mechanicsville; returning on the next day to Gaines's Mill to meet, in the engagement there, on June 
27, the greatest loss suffered during its service; it took part, with loss also, at Malvern Hill July 1, where Colonel 
Cass was mortally wounded. Returning from the Peninsula, the regiment was engaged August 29, without loss, at 
Manassas, and moving with the army to Washington, began its march into Maryland September 12, being 
present, in reserve, at the battle of Antietam September 17, and engaged at Fredericksburg Dec. 13, 1862. After 
spending the winter of 1863 at Falmouth, Va., the regiment was engaged at Chancellorsville (May 3) and Gettysburg, 
having met the enemy also in the latter part of May while on picket duty on the Rappahannock. Taking part in the 
pursuit of the enemy after the battle of Gettysburg, it was engaged at Wapping Heights July 24, 1863. The regi- 
ment encamped afterward at Beverly Ford on the Rappahannock and remained doing picket duty until September 
14, engaging then in the actions at Rappahannock Station and taking part in the Mine Run campaign in November. 
It occupied winter quarters at Bealton Station until April 30, 1864, when it moved toward the Wilderness, and going 
into action May 5, took pait in the following days' battles, moving with the army and engaging at Laurel Hill, 
Spotsylvania and Cold Harbor. On June 10, 1864, its term of service expired and the day found the regiment at 
Bottom's Bridge, Va., under heavy fire; it withdrew to White House Landing and on June 12 arrived at Washing-, 
ton. Reaching Massachusetts on the loth, it was mustered out at Boston, June 21, 1864. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



213 



Ninth 


Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 














*3 
« 

CO 

■O 
C 

2 


hi 


Companies. 


(A 

V S 

.is 

3 

C 

fc> 




, 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


00 

3 

© 

Eh 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


• 


1 


14 


22 


21 


15 


19 


20 


10 


19 


12 


15 


19 




15 
172 




1 


2 


1 

7 


1 
2 


2 


5 


6 


6 


1 
9 


8 


1 
9 


2 


- 


187 


Missing, 

Died by accident or disease, — N 
Enlisted men, . 


6 

3 
54 




2 


16 


1 

31 


1 

25 


2 
19 


24 


3 
29 


4 
20 


29 


1 
21 


1 
26 


21 


- 


57 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, . 


13 


Total losses, — 

Enlisted men, . 


18 
245 




- 






















263 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1861. 

Place unknown, 

1868. 

May 27, Hanover Court House, 

Va. 
June 26, Mechanicsville, Va., 
June 27, Gaines's Mill, Va., 
July 1, Malvern Hill, Va., 
Dec. 13, Fredericksburg, Va., 
Place unknown, 

1863. 

July 1-3, Gettysburg, Pa., . 

1864.< 

May 5-8, Wilderness, Va., . 
May 8-19, Spotsylvania (Laurel 

Hill), Va 
May 30, Shady Grove Church, 

Va. 
May 31, Near Pamunky River, 

Va. 
Place unknown, 


1 


6 

2 

5 

1 


12 

5 

1 
5 


1 
9 
3 

1 
8 


7 
3 

3 
2 


9 

4 

3 
1 

1 
1 


1 

7 
2 
1 
1 

3 
5 


5 
2 

1 

1 
1 


1 

5 
3 

1 

1 

4 
4 

1 


8 
1 
1 

1 
1 


7 
1 

5 
3 


6 
3 

1 

1 
1 

6 
2 

1 


- 


1 

1 

1 

81 

30 

2 

3 

2 
3 

•39 

24 

1 
1 

4 



Present also at Yorktown, Manassas, Antietam, Chancellorsville, Wapping Heights, Mine Run, North 

Anna River, Bethesda Church and Cold Harbor. 



214 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Tenth Begiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Henry S. Briggs, Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(2) Col. Henry L. Eustis, Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





fc- 
CO 

■d 

5 

% 


3 




Companies. 


to' 

2 2 

1 b 
Ed a 

to 

2 
& 






A 


B 


C 


D 


B 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


to 

H 
o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


15 
15 


63 


24 


102 


114 


124 


108 


108 


115 


121 


137 


122 


108 


2 


78 
1,200 




7 


- 


- 


1 

2 


4 


8 
2 


1 


2 
1 


3 


3 


1 


3 


3 
1 


2 


1,278 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


36 
6 


Totals. .... 


7 

15 
8 


63 


24 


3 

99 


4 
110 


10 
114 


1 

107 


3 
105 


3 

112 


3 

118 


1 
136 


3 
119 


4 
104 


42 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men,' . 


78 
1,158 


Totals 






















1,236 



Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 10th Mass. Infantry was recruited in the western part of the State, was mustered into the service June 21, 
1861, under Col. Henry S. Briggs, and left Boston July 25, 1861, for Washington, where it remained stationed at 
Camp Brightwood during the autumn and winter of 1861-62. On March 27, 1862, it left Washington for Fortress 
Monroe, and was engaged during the siege of Torktown and present at the battle of Williamsburg It was located 
for the month of May near Bottom's Bridge; engaged with loss at Fair Oaks May 31; was present at Oak Grove 
June 25, and heavily engaged at Malvern Hill. After the encampment at Harrison's Landing, the regiment returned 
with the army to Alexandria and united with General Pope's army at Chain Bridge September 2. On September 3 
It began its part in the campaign into Maryland, was present though not called into action at Antietam, and was en- 
gaged without loss at Fredericksburg, encamping afterward in winter quarters at Falmouth, Va. At the battle of 
Chancellorsville the regiment, as part of General Sedgwick's forces, was engaged May 3 at Marye's "Heights and 
Salem Church under command of Major Parker, Colonel Eustis being in command of bligade. The regiment was in 
reserve and on the skirmish line duriug the battle of Gettysburg, and followed the retreat of the Confederates into 
Virginia. It acted in support of artillery at the battle of Rappahannock Station November 7, took part in the Mine 
Run campaign, and encamped afterward at Brandy Station for the winter, engaging in February in the expedition 
to Robertson's River. 

At the battle of the Wilderness the regiment suffered great loss on May 5, taking active part again on May 6. At 
Spotsylvania it was engaged and under heavy fire on the 8th, 9th and 12th of May, and took part also with loss on the 
18th. It was engaged at Cold Harbor, moving on June 13 toward Petersburg, and encamping June 17 within two 
miles of the city. On June 19 the regiment was relieved and withdrew from the front, its term of service having ex- 
pired. It went to Washington June 22 and reached Springfield, Mass., June 25, where five companies were mustered 
out July 1, and the remainder July 6, 1864. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



215 



Tenth 


Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 












•a 
c 
d 


13 


•a 

3 
H 


Companies. 


c 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


"3 

O 

E- 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


2 


9 




5 


9 


8 


14 


7 


9 


7 


22 


15 


12 





11 

108 


Totals, .... 

Died by accident or disease, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


- 


1 


1 


3 


5 


7 


2 


3 


4 


3 


5 


8 


6 


119 

1 
47 


Totals, .... 

Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 

Total losses, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


2 


10 


1 


8 


14 


15 


1 
17 


1 
11 


13 


10 


1 

28 


1 
24 


18 


_^ 


48 

4 

12 
159 


Totals, .... 


























171 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1863. 

May 31 , Fair Oaks or Seven 

Pines, Va. 
July 1, Malvern Hill, Va , 

Place unknown, . 



1863. 

May 3, Chancellorsville 
(Salem Heights, 
Fredericksburg), 
Va. 

Nov. 7, Rappahannock Sta- 
tion, Va. 
Place unknown, . 



1864. 
May 6-12, Wilderness, Va., . 
May 10-18, Spotsylvania, Va., 
June 6-7, Cold Harbor, Va., 
June 20, Petersburg, Va., . 
Place unknown, . 



1 

1 


3 

" 3 

2 

1 


- 


1 

1 
2 
1 


3 
3 

3 


4 
2 

2 


2 
3 

1 

1 

3 

4 


1 
1 

1 

1 

2 

1 


2 
4 

1 

2 


2 
2 

1 
1 
1 


12 
1 

1 
8 


4 
1 

5 

1 

1 

2 
1 


1 
2 

9 


- 



34 

14 
2 



13 

1 
3 



29 

16 

2 

1 

4 



Present also at Yorktown, Williamsburg, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg and Mine Run. 



216 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Eleventh Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. George Clark, Jr. 

(2) Col. "William Blaisdell, Bvt. Brig. Gen. "U. S. Vols. 

(3) Col. Thomas H. Dunham, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





id 

es 

CO 

■a 
a 
8 

s 

N 


a 
3 


•a 
B 

5} 


Companies. 


OS 

$ g 

i* 

a 
S 







A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


3 

o 


Number on regimental rolls , — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


20 
18 


84 


24 


166 


221 


187 


200 


218 


253 


135 


192 


125 


196 
4 


26 


104 
1,961 




8 


- 


- 


5 


5 


4 


6 


3 
1 


5 
3 


1 


4 
3 


2 


- 


2,065 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


47 

7 


Totals, .... 


8 

20 
10 


84 


24 


5 
161 


5 
216 


4 
183 


6 

194 


4 
214 


8 
245 


1 

134 


7 
185 


2 
123 


4 
192 


26 


54 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 ' . 


104 
1,907 






























2,011 



Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 11th Mass. Infantry, known as the Boston Volunteers, was recruited chiefly in Boston hy Col. George Clark, 
Jr., in April, 1861, and, when eight companies were filled, was ordered to Fort Warren, Boston Harbor; there two 
companies were added and on June 13 it was mustered into the service of the United States. On June 29 it left the 
State for Washington and arriving, encamped near the city. It took part in the battle of Bull Run July 21, and as 
part of Hooker's Brigade moved, August 9, to Bladensburg, Md., going into winter quarters at Budd's Ferry October 
27. April 5, 1862, the regiment, now a part of Grover's Brigade, Hooker's Division, embarked for the peninsula, 
and took part at the siege of Torktown, engaging on April 26 in the assault and capture of a Confederate lunette. 
At the battle of Williamsburg, May 5, it was engaged early in the day aud again in the afternoon. Encamping 
during June at White Oak Swamp, it was active at Oak Grove June 25, and took part at Savage's Station, Glendale 
and Malvern Hill. During the encampment at Harrison's Landing the regiment engaged in the action at Malvern 
Hill, August 5. It was in action at Catlett's Station, August 27, and was closely engaged in the afternoon of August 
29 at Manassas with great loss. Marching to Alexandria the regiment engaged in the defences of Washington until 
November 1; then, forming part of a provisional brigade under Colonel Blaisdell, it was on duty at Warrenton 
Junction and later occupied winter quarters near Falmouth, Va. 

At Cha'ncellorsville the regiment was engaged on May 2 and 3, 1863, and at Gettysburg lost heavily on July 2. It took 
part in the operations near the Rappahannock and engaged in action at Locust Grove during the Mine Run campaign. 
As part of General Hancock's Corps the regiment was engaged at the battle of the Wilderness, May 5, 6 and 7, 1864, 
taking part in the struggle at the " Angle" during the battle of Spotsylvania Court House May 12, and joining after- 
ward in the engagements about North Anna and Cold Harbor. June 12 the regiment's original term of enlistment 
expired, and the men whose service was ended returned to Massachusetts and were mustered out. Many men had 
re-enlisted, and these with the recruits formed a battalion of five companies, commanded by Colonel Blaisdell and 
moved with the army to Petersburg, taking part in the assault of June 16-18, and engaging afterward in the siege. 
Colonel Blaisdell was killed on the skirmish line June 23. The regiment took part in the final operations about 
Petersburg in March and April, 1865, was active in the pursuit of the Confederates, and present at the surrender of 
General Lee's Army at Appomattox. At the close of the campaign the regiment was stationed at Washington until 
its return to Massachusetts and its discharge, July 14, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



217 





Eleventh Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 














03 

oj 

CO 

■o 
e 
ta 
•o 

£ 


C 

3 


Companies. 


S 






A 


B 


O 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


09 

O 

Eh 


Killed and died of ^ 
Officers, . 
Enlisted men, 


rounds, — 
disease, — 


2 
1 

2 
1 


8 
12 


10 


16 


13 


8 


9 


17 


7 


14 


9 


17 


_ 


10 
120 


Totals, . 


1 

8 

3 
22 


5 
4 


1 

7 


3 
5 


3 
11 


3 

5 


2 
3 


4 
12 


1 
3 

1 
14 


6 
9 

6 
38 





130 




29 


Died by accident or 
Enlisted men," 


4 
68 




25 


2 

23 


2 
18 


4 
27 


3 

28 


5 
17 


4 
34 


72 


Died as prisoners, - 
Officers, . 
Enlisted men, 


30 


Total losses, — 
Officers, . 
Enlisted men,* 


14 

247 
























261 



1 Including non-commissioned stuff. 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1861. 

21, Bull Run, Va., . 

13, Bladensburg, Md., . 

1868. 

5, Williamsburg, Va., . 
10, Yorktown, Va , 
5, Malvern Hill, Va., . 
Aug. 29, 30, Manassas, Va., or 
Bull Run, 2d. 
Place unknown, 

1863. 

2, 3, Chancellorsville, Va., 
1-3, Gettysburg, Pa., 
27, Mine Run (Locust 
Grove) , Va. 

1864. 

5, 6, Wilderness, Va., 
8-13, Spotsylvania, Va., 
12, Petersburg, Va., 
16, Petersburg, Va., 
June 23-Oct.27, beforePetersburg, 
Va. 
27, Hatcher's Run or 
Boydtown Plank 
Road, Va. 
Place unknown, 

1865. 

31, Hatcher's Run or 
Boydtown Plank 
Road, Va. 
Place unknown, 



July 
Aug. 

May 
May 
Aug 



May 
July 
Nov. 



May 
May 
May 
June 



Oct. 



March 



1 
- 1 


1 

2 

2 

1 

1 
1 


3 
1 

1 

2 
1 

1 

1 

1 


3 

6 
3 

1 
5 

1 
1 


2 

1 

2 
3 

4 
1 

1 


2 

1 

1 
4 

1 
1 

1 


3 

2 

3 
2 


6 

5 

1 
4 

1 

1 
1 

1 


1 

1 

2 
1 

2 
2 


3 

2 

3 
2 

. 1 
3 

1 

1 

2 


1 

4 

1 
2 

1 
1 


1 

2 

3 
1 

1 

7 

1 
1 

2 
1 

2 
1 





23 
1 

14 

1 

2 

27 



15 
35 



Present also at Oak Grove, Savage's Station, Glendale, Bristoe Station, Chantilly, Fredericksburg, 
Kelly's Ford, North Anna, Totopotomoy, Cold Harbor, Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, Poplar Spring 
Church, Farmville, Sailor's Creek and Appomattox. 



218 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Twelfth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 
(1) Col. Fletcher Webster. (2) Col. James L. Bates. 





n 

s 

2 
S 


C 

3 


n 


Companies. 


CO 

p 






A 


B 


C 


D 


B 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


3 

o 
H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


17 
18 


56 


21 


157 


134 


163 


140 


130 


159 


145 


146 


157 


152 


14 
14 


73 

1,536 


Totals, .... 


8 


- 


- 


2 


1 

1 


2 


2 
1 


2 




4 
2 


3 


2 


1,609 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


4 
2 


3 


33 
6 


Totals, .... 


8 

17 
10 


56 


21 


2 
155 


2 
132 


2 
161 


3 

137 


2 
128 


6 
153 


3 

142 


6 
140 


3 

154 


2 
150 


39 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


73 

1,497 


Totals, .... 




























1,570 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



Recruiting for the 12th Mass. Infantry began April 22, 1861, through the efforts of Fletcher Webster of Marsh- 
field, Mass., who afterward became its colonel, and through whom it gained the title of " The Webster Regiment." 
May 1 the companies raised were stationed at Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, and on June 26, 1861, the greater part 
of the regiment was mustered into the United States' service, the organization being completed July 11 ; on July 23 it 
left the State and, assigned to Abercrombie's Brigade of General Banks' forces, went by the way of Baltimore to 
Harper's Ferry, and was engaged during the remainder of the year in guarding the upper Potomac; moving in the 
autumn to Hyattstown and Seneca Mills and making its winter quarters at Frederick, Md. In February, 1862, the 
regiment broke camp, and entering the Shenandoah Valley reconnoitered during the spring and early summer in the 
neighborhood of Winchester, Aldie, Front Royal and Manassas, becoming in June part of Ricketts' Division, 
McDowell's Corps, Army of Virginia. It entered at dusk on August 9 into the battle of Cedar Mountain and was 
closely engaged at Manassas August 30, suffering great loss in the death of Colonel Webster. As part of General 
Hartsuff's Brigade in the 1st Corps under Hooker, Army of the Potomac, the regiment took part at the battle of 
South Mountain and began its part at Antietam early in the morning of September 17, at Dunker's Church, losing 
heavily. At Fredericksburg the regiment was actively engaged in the afternoon of December 13 with much loss. 
Occupying winter quarters near Fletcher's Chapel, it engaged in the "mud march" of January, 1863; it was active 
at the battle of Chancellorsville and was engaged at Gettysburg, meeting its principal loss July 1. It took part in 
the march to the Rappahannock and in the Mine Ruu campaign in November, 1863. At the battle of the Wilderness 
it was engaged May 5 and 6, and shared in the movements to Spotsylvania, North Anna and Cold Harbor, being 
constantly in action with frequent losses. June 16 the regiment moved to Petersburg and took part in the assaults 
of the following days. June 25, 1864, the regiment's term of service expired and it retired from the front; the 
re-enlisted men and the recruits were transferred to the 39th Mass. Infantry, and returning to Washington June 28, 
it left at once for Massachusetts and was mustered out of service on Boston Common, July 8, 1864. 



MASSACHUS': 7 TTS VOLUNTEERS. 



219 



Twelfth Jttegiment Massachusetts Infantry. 












« 
•a 

3 
■a 

S 


C 
3 


Companies. 


U 3 
II 

Hi 

3 








A 
19 


B 


C 


D 


B 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


00 

H 

o 

EH 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 


4 


13 


17 


15 


14 


21 


17 


20 


11 


13 


13 


- 


17 
160 


Totals, 


4 


13 


3 

9 

3 

34 


2 

6 

1 

26 


10 
25 


2 

4 

2 

22 


2 

2 

25 


5 

6 

28 


3 

2 

25 


6 

4 

21 


2 
5 

7 
27 


5 

2 

20 


177 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Enlisted men, .... 

Died as prisoners, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


11 

55 
27 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men 


17 
253 


Totals, 
























270 



1863. 

Aug. 28, Thoroughfare Gap, Va., 

Aug. 30, 31, Manassas, or Bull 
Run, 2d, Va 

Sept. 14, South Mt., Md., . 

Sept. 17, Antietam, Md., . 

Dec. 13, Fredericksburg, Va., . 

Dec. 18, Front of Fredericks- 
burg, Va. 
Place unknown, . 

1863. 

July 1-3, Gettysburg, Pa., . 
July 8, Funkstown, Md., 
Place unknown, . 

1864. 

May 5-8, Wilderness, Va., . 
May 8-14, Spotsylvania, Laurel 

Hill, Va. 
May 24, North Anna River, Va., 
June 1-3, Bethesda Church, Va., 
June 18-21, Petersburg, Va , . 
Place unknown, . 


1 
2 

1 


1 

3 
1 

2 

3 
1 


2 

10 

4. 

1 

3 
2 


3 

7 
3 

1 

1 
1 

3 


3 

4 
2 

2 

2 

1 

1 


5 

4 
1 

5 
1 


1 

1 

11 

1 

4 

1 

1 

1 

2 


5 

2 
2 

* 1 

3 
4 


2 

7 
3 

1 

1 

3 
2 

1 


1 
3 

2 

3 
1 

1 


2 
9 

1 
1 

1 

1 


1 

7 
4 

1 


- 


2 

1 

26 

1 
66 
24 

1 

7 

12 
1 
1 

24 
12 

1 
1 
5 
3 



Present also at Chancellorsville, Mine Run, Totopotomoy and Cold Harbor. 



220 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Thirteenth Begiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

Col. Samuel H. Leonard. 





■2 

•o 
c 

03 

2 

S 


0J 

3 


•d 

5 

85 


Companies. 


CO 

<^ 5 

&% 

to" 
a 

a 




. 


A 


B 


C 


D 


B 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


ED 

o 

EH 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men,' . 


12 
17 


62 


21 


154 


135 


145 


131 


137 


126 


134 


140 


125 


142 

1 


2 


74 
1,409 


Totals, .... 


8 


- 


- 


3 
1 


4 


4 


3 

2 


3 


1 
1 


2 
1 


2 


3 


- 


1,483 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


34 
5 


Totals, .... 


8 

12 
9 


62 


21 


4 
150 


4 
131 


4 
141 


5 
126 


3 
134 


2 
124 


3 
131 


2 
138 


3 

122 


1 
141 


2 


39 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


74 
1,370 






























1,444 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 4th Battalion Rifles, M. V. M., nucleus of the 13th Mass. Infantry, and forming afterward Cos. A, B, C and 
D in that regiment, was ordered, with the Roxbury Rifles, afterward Co. E, 13th Infantry, to Fort Independence, 
Boston harbor, May 25, 1861. On June 29 the State sent five companies more to join them at the fort, and from these 
organizations the 13tb Mass. Infantry was formed, being mustered into the service of the United States July 16, 1861. 
Leaving Massachusetts for Washington July 29, 1861, the regiment marched immediately into Maryland, receiving 
orders to join General Banks at Harper's Ferry ; and remained on duty guarding the upper Potomac until the spring 
of 1862, encamping nt Sharpsburg, Sandy Hook and Darnestown in the summer and autumn, and making winter 
quarters at Williamsport, Md. March 1, 1862, the regiment broke camp, crossed the Potomac, and, assigned to the 
2d Division, General McDowell's Corps, Army of Virginia, was engaged during the spring and summer in guarding 
the north bank of the Rappahannock, engaging in the battle of Cedar Mountain, taking a most active part in the 
afternoon of August 30 at the battle of Manassas, and being present in reserve at the battle of Chantilly. As part of 
General Ricketts' Division of Hooker's Corps at Antietam, September 17, the regiment was engaged at the opening 
of the battle early in the morning at Dunker's Church with great loss. After taking part at Fredericksburg it went 
into winter quarters near Fletcher's Chapel, Va., joining, in January, 1863, in the unsuccessful march toward the 
Rappahannock. The regiment took active part in the spring campaign, meeting its principal losses at Chancellors- 
ville on May 4 and at Gettysburg on July 1, and was engaged in the actions near the Rappahannock and in the Mine 
Run campaign. The regiment was in command of Lieutenant-Colonel Hovey at the Wilderness in May, 1864, taking 
its most active part in the series of battles on May 5; and was constantly in action about Spotsylvania, North Anna 
and Cold Harbor. The regiment crossed the James with the army, and, now under command of Major Pierce, took 
part in the assault at Petersburg June 18, and served afterward in the trenches until July 14, when its term of service 
expired and it withdrew from the front. Returning to Washington July 17, it reached Boston July 21, and was 
mustered out of service Aug. 1, 1864. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



221 



Thirteenth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 





09 
03 

•a 
c 

03 

2 

S 


03 

3 


Companies. 


•Si 

"3J8S 
03 

a 






A 


B 


O 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


CO 

o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Enlisted men, .... 






10 

5 
IS 


12 

4 
1 

17 


12 


14 


8 


8 


4 


15 


12 


13 




4 
108 


Totals, 


- 


4 


3 
15 


2 
5 

21 


2 
10 


1 

2 

2 

13 


1 
2 

7 


1 

2 

18 


1 
5 

18 


5 
18 


- 


112 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Enlisted men, .... 

Died as prisoners, — 

Enlisted men 


6 

35 

3 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


4 

152 




























156 



Casualties by Engagements. 



Sept, 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Dec. 



1861. 

15, Harper's Ferry, Va., . 

1868. 

28, Thoroughfare Gap,Va., 
30, Manassas, Va., . 
17, Antietam, Md., . 
13, Fredericksburg, Va., . 



1863. 

April 30, Fitz Hugh's Crossing, 

Va 
May 4, Chancellorsville, Va., 
July 1-2, Gettysburg, Pa., . 

1864. 

May 5-10, Wilderness, Va., . 
May 8-11, Spotsylvania, Va , 
June 1-3, Bethesda Church, Va., 
June 2-12, Cold Harbor, Va., 
June 20-22, Petersburg, Va , . 
July 12-18, Petersburg, Va., . 



- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 














2 














- 


— 


3 


7 


6 


7 


- 


3 


_ 




5 


2 


_ 


- 


- 


5 


1 


1 


3 


1 


2 


3 


5 


_ 


4 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 
















- 


2 
























- 


— 


1 


2 


4 


1 


2 


1 


1 


4 


3 


6 


- 




2 


_ 


1 














1 


1 














1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


— 


- 


- 


— 


— 


— 


1 


_ 


_ 


— 


































1 












i 


1 




•> _ 



2 
36 
25 

4 



1 
25 



Present also at North Anna and Totopotomoy. 



222 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



* Fifteenth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Charles Devens, Bvt. Maj. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(2) Col. George H. Ward, Bvt. Brig. Gen. "U. S. Vols. 





fg 

<n 

•a 

c 

5 


a 
3 


03 

CQ 


Companies. 


09 

o g 

s 
5 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


■a 

o 
Eh 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men," . 


15 
15 


81 


22 


158 

3 
2 


157 


161 


180 


150 


161 


158 


163 


170 


152 


22 


96 

1,669 




7 


- 


- 


6 
2 


7 
2 


2 
3 


2 
1 


6 


2 


3 
1 


1 

2 


2 

2 
150 


22 


1,765 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
regiment. 


42 
11 


Totals, .... 


7 

15 
8 


81 


22 


5 
153 


8 
149 


9 
152 


5 
175 


3 
147 


6 
155 


2 
156 


4 
159 


2 

168 


53 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


96 
1,616 


Totals, .... 




* 






















" 




1,712 



* The Fourteenth Massachusetts Infantry, having been converted into the First Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, 
has already been inserted in its place. 

1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 15th Mass. Infantry was recruited in Worcester County, Mass., being partially based on militia companies 
already existing, and was mustered into the service of the United States July 12, 1861. Its colonel, Charles Devens, 
Jr., at the time of his appointment stationed at Fort McHenry, Md., as colonel of the 3d Battalion Rifles, M. V. M., 
joined the regiment in July. August 8 it left the State for Washington, and two weeks later moved to Poolesville, 
Md., and was stationed on the upper Potomac. It was the first to take part in the battleof Ball's Bluff; crossingthe 
river the night of October 20, it engaged in action the next morning and shared in the final battle of the afterr ■». 
meeting heavy Iobb in killed, wounded and prisoners. In February, 1862, the regiment moved to Harper's Ferry and 
engaged in reconnoitering in the Shenandoah valley. Returning to Washington, it joined the Army of the Potomac 
on the Peninsula April 1, and took part in the siege of Torktown; here the Andrew Sharpshooters were attached to 
the regiment and remained with it until the spring of 1863. Ab part of Sumner's Corps it moved after the surrender 
of Torktown to the Chickahominy River and encamped, taking part in the battle of Fair Oaks and in the seven days' 
battles. It returned to Alexandria AuguBt 28, and marched ou the 29th to Ceutreville, returning with the Array of 
Virginia to Washington September 2. As part of General Sedgwick's Division the regiment met the greatest loss 
during its service in the charge made on the morning of September 17 at the battle of Antietam. It was engaged at 
Fredericksburg Dec. 13, and encamped for the winter of 1863 near Falmouth, Va. May 2, 1864, it left camp and took 
part the next day at the battle of Chancellorsville. At Gettysburg it was closely engaged July 2, when Colonel 
Ward was mortally wounded, and it took part also July 3 and 4. It moved with the army into Virginia and engaged 
in the Mine Run campaign, encamping afterward for the winter Dear Stevensburg. In the campaign of 1864 the 
regiment formed part of the 1st Brigade, 2d Division 2d Army Corps, shared with it in the battles of the Wilderness, 
May 5 and '6, and engaged in all the actions about Spotsylvania, North Anna and Cold Harbor, moving to Petersburg 
in June, greatly reduced in numbers by losses in action. On June 22, while stationed on the Jerusalem Plank Road, 
many members of the regiment were taken prisoners. July 12, 1864, its term of service expired, and it withdrew 
from the front and, returning to Massachusetts, was mustered out July 28, 1864. Co. I, which was the last of the 
regiment to be mustered in, remained behind, and was discharged at the expiration of its term in August. The re- 
enlisted men and recruits were transferred to the 20th Mass. Infantry. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



228 



Fifteenth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 












S3 

CO 

T3 
C 

s 

s 

5 


c3 

3 


■a 
a 

a 


Companies. 


■of 

is* 
a 






A 


B l C 


D 


B 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


O 

H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


2 


13 




10 

7 


15 


30 


17 


17 


23 


26 


22 


25 


23 


2 


15 
210 


Totals, .... 


2 


1 


1 


1 

8 


1 

7 


2 
12 


6 


3 


1 
14 


18 


6 
11 

6 
48 


6 

1 
29 


1 


225 




— IT 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, . 


i 

93 




14 


1 


2 
19 


2 
26 


3 
41 


4 
35 


5 
28 


26 


5 
46 


4 

44 


3 


94 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


32 


Total losses, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


16 
346 




























362 







Casualties by Engagements. 
















1861. 

Oct. 21, Ball's Bluff, Va., . 
Place unknown, . 

1868. 

Sept. 17, Antietam, Md., . 
Dec. 13, Fredericksburg, 
Va. 
Place unknown, . 

1863. 

July 1-3, Gettysburg, Va., . 
Oct. 14, Bristoe Station, Va., 
Oct. 30, Near "Warrenton, 

Va. 
Nov. 27, Robertson's Tavern, 
Va. 
Place unknown, . 

1864. 

May 5-8, Wilderness, Va., . 
May 10-31, Spotsylvania, Va., 
June 3-4, Cold Harbor, Va , 
June 5, Near Petersburg, 

Va. 
June 22, Before Petersburg, 
Va. 
Place unknown, . 
Year and place un- 
known. 


1 
1 


2 
4 

3 
1 

1 
1 

1 


- 


1 

1 

3 

1 

4 


5 
3 

3 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 


5 

2 
13 

1 

5 

4 
1 


4 

1 

10 

1 
1 

1 
1 


2 

2 

7 

1 

3 
2 


3 
15 

2 
1 

2 


4 

1 

11 
3 

3 

3 
1 
1 


6 
11 

4 
1 


8 

12 

1 
5 

3 

1 

1 


3 
1 

1 
5 

6 

2 
1 

3 
1 


i 

1 
1 


42 
2 

7 
91 

4 

10 

33 
3 
1 

2 

5 

13 

7 
3 
1 

2 

8 
2 



Present also at Yorktown, West Point, Oak Grove, Gaines's Mill, Peach Orchard, Savage's Station, 
Glendale, Malvern Hill, Chancellorsville, Po River and North Anna River. 



224 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Sixteenth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Powell T Wyman. (2) Col. Thomas R. Tannatt. (3) Col. Gardner Banks. 





a 

en 

■a 


c 

3 


•6 

3 
« 


Companies. 


go 

PS 

I* 

<s 
c 
& 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


BO 

o 
H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


14 
14 


61 


23 


126 
3 

3 
123 


134 


123 


121 


136 


129 


124 


119 


127 


131 


6 


75 
1,313 




6 

6 

14 
8 


- 


- 


1 
3 


1 

1 


3 


2 


2 


1 
1 


6 
1 


3 
1 


2 

1 


1,388 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


30 
8 


Totals, .... 


61 


23 


4 
130 


2 
121 


3 
118 


2 

134 


2 
127 


2 

122 


7 
112 


4 

123 


3 

128 


6 


38 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


75 
1,275 


























1,350 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The companies forming the 16th Mass. Infantry had mostly heen recruited singly in April and May, 1861, and 
being united at Camp Cameron, Cambridge, were mustered into service on dates varying from June 29 to July 12, 
1861. Under command of Col. Powell T. Wyman, a graduate of West Point, who had returned from Europe to offer 
his services to the government, the regiment left the State Aug. 17, 1861, and was stationed in camp near Baltimore, 
Md., until September 1; moving then to Fortress Monroe, it encamped near Hampton, Va., during the autumn and 
winter of 1861 and 1862. In May, 1862, it moved successively to Portsmouth arid Suffolk, Va., and June 12 joined the 
army of the Potomac at Fair Oaks. While encamped at Fair Oaks the regiment made a reconnoissance on the 
Williamsburg Road, June 18, with great loss. It took part in the battle of Oak Grove, June 25; and at Glendale, 
June 30, Colonel Wyman was killed. It was engaged at Malvern Hill July 1, and again on August 8 in the recon- 
jioisBance from the camp at Harrison's Landing. The regiment, in command of Major Banks, and forming part of 
Hooker's Division, arrived at Alexandria, Va., August 22, on its way to join the Army of Virginia, reaching Centre- 
ville August 28, and took part in the charge made by General Grover's Brigade in the afternoon of August 29 at 
Groveton. On the return of the forces to Washington the regiment remained engaged in its defences until Novem- 
ber, then moved to Warrenton Junction as part of Colonel BlaiBdell's Brigade. It took part at Fredericksburg in 
December, 1862, and occupied wiuter quarters at Falmouth, engaging in the "mud march" of January, 1863. At 
Chancellorsville, May 3, the regiment met heavy loss, and its division commander, General Berry, was killed. It 
was closely engaged at Gettysburg in command of Lieutenant-Colonel Merriam. In December it went into winter 
quarters at Brandy Station, having taken part in the movements about the Rappahannock and at Mine Run. In the 
campaign of 1864 the regiment formed part of the 2d Corps, and was engaged at the Wilderness May 5 and again on 
May 6, takiug part at Spotsylvania May 10 and in the battle of Spotsylvania Court House May 12, when Lieutenant- 
Colonel Merriam was killed. It engaged in the actions about North Anna and Cold Harbor, and, moving to Peters- 
burg, it took active part in the assaults of June 16-18, and remained afterward engaged in the siege until the expira- 
tion of its term of service, July 11 ; withdrawing from the front, it reached Massachusetts July 22, and was mustered 
out of service July 27, 1864. Many members of the regiment had re-enlisted during the previous winter for an addi- 
tional term, and these, with the recruits, were attached to the 11th Mass. Infantry, and remained in service until the 
close of the war. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



225 



Sixteenth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 












OS 

p 
a 
•a 
% 


c 
3 


Companies. 


n 

Is 

to *""l 

03 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


3 
o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


3 


13 


6 


14 


14 


10 


18 


17 


14 


12 


13 


10 


1 


16 
129 




- 




2 
3 

11 


5 


2 


3 

2 

2 


1 
14 


4 


3 
11 


4 


1 
9 


7 


- 


145 


Missing, 


10 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


2 
61 


Totals, 


3 


1 
16 


19 


1 


3 


3 


6 


5 


2 


3 


1 


63 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 


1 
25 




17 


17 


36 


24 


34 


21 


25 


20 


26 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


19 

225 






















244 



Casualties by Engagevients. 



1868. 






























June 18, Fair Oaks or Williams- 


_ 


1 


_ 


2 


3 


4 


1 


7 


6 


1 


2 


3 


_ 


30 


burg Road, Va. 






























June 25, Fair Oaks or Oak Grove, 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 


- _ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4 


Va. 






























June 30, Glendale, Va., 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


— 


] 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


2 


_ 


_ 


7 


Aug. 27-29, Eull Run, 2d, or Man- 


_ 


2 


1 


3 


6 


1 


7 




4 


- 


4 


1 


- 


30 


assas, Va. 






























Dec. 11-14, Fredericksburg, Va , . 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


_ 


4 


Dec. 15, Near Falmouth, Va., . 














1 














1 


Place unknown, . 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


3 


1868. 






























May 3, Chancellorsville, Va , . 


_ 


4 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


3 




_ 


1 


3 


3 


_ 


18 


July 1-3, Gettysburg, Pa., . 


_ 


4 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 




- 


7 


1 


— 


1 


23 


Nov. 27, Locust Grove, Va., 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


Place unknown, . 
























1 


- 


1 


1864. 






























May 3-12, Wilderness, Va., . 


_ 


2 


_ . 


__ 


1 


1 


2 




_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


11 


May 10^12, Spotsylvania, Va., 


-1 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 




1 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


7 


June 16-20, Petersburg, Va., . 












1 


1 




2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5 


Place unknown, . 


— 


— 


1 


1 


— 


— 


— 


~ 


— 


- 


1 


— 


- 


3 



Present also at Malvern Hill, Kettle Run, Chantilly, Wapping Heights, North Anna.'Totopotomoy and 

Cold Harbor. 



226 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Seventeenth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

Col. Thomas J. C. Amoky, Bvt. Brig. Gen. IT. S. "Vols. 





IB 

c; 
-*. 

Ul 

•O 

S3 

s 

E 


c 
3 


•a 

C3 


Companies. 


QQ 

s 

c 






A 


B 


C D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


"3 
o 

En 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, . . . . 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


14 
18 


74 


24 


186 


156 


139 


159 


188 


210 


210 


193 


101 


1 
113J 


9 


88 
1,706 


Totals, .... 


9 


- 


- 


2 
3 


2 


9 
t 

3 


3 
2 


2 


3 
2 


1 


3 


1 
1 


2 


- 


1,794 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment.' 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


36 
12 


Totals, .... 


9 

14 
9 


74 


24 


5 
181 


2 
154 


12 
127 


5 
154 


2 
186 


5 
205 


1 

209 


3 

190 


2 
99 


2 

111 


9 


48 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


88 
1,658 


Totals 






























1,746 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 17th Mass. Infantry was recruited during July and August, 1861, and encamped at Lynnfield, Mass., until it 
left the State on August 23. Thomas J. C. Amory, its colonel, was a West Point graduate, and at the time of his 
appointment in this regiment was captain of the 7th U. S. Infantry. On reaching Baltimore, the command was 
stationed near the city, forming part of the forces under General Dix, and remained there until the spring of 1862, 
when It moved to New Berne, N. O. In December, 1862, it engaged in the Goldsboro' expedition, taking part in the 
battles of Kinston, Whitehall and Goldsboro'; returning to New Berne, it was engaged as provost guard of the city 
until the latter part of January, 1863, encamping afterward on the Trent River. In April, 1863, it was sent to the 
relief of Little Washington, N. C, taking part in the same month in an expedition to Core Creek, and in July in ex- 
peditions to Trenton and to Mount Tabor Church. In February, 1864, the regiment was engaged at Batchelder'g 
Creek in the vicinity of New Berne, losing a number, killed and wounded, and also a large number of prisoners, 
many of whom died in prison. On April 18, 1864, it was sent again to Little Washington, returning to New Berne 
on the 30th. On July 21 the term of service of the regiment under the original enlistment expired, and those whose 
service was ended returned to Massachusetts and were mustered out Aug. 3, 1864; those of the regimeut who had 
re-enlisted, and the recruits, remained at New Berne under command of Capt. Henry Splaine, and the command was 
enlarged during the winter of 1864 and 1865 by the addition of five companies transferred from the 2d Mass. Heavy 
Artillery. Colonel Amory, commanding the sub-district of Beaufort, died of yellow fever at Beaufort, Oct. 7, 1864. 
The regiment moved to Core Creek March 4, 1865, and from the 8th to the 11th of the month was engaged at Wise's 
Forks under command of Maj. Wm. M. Smith, Lieutenant-Colonel Splaine being in charge of the brigade of which 
the regiment formed a part. Joining General Sherman's army at Goldsboro', N. C, March 26, 1865, the regiment 
moved with it to Raleigh April 14, receiving here the news of the surrender of Johnston's army. May 5 it left 
Raleigh for Greensboro', N. C, and on arrival was stationed on garrison duty there until the close of its service, 
July 11, 1865, on which day it was mustered out, and, returning to Massachusetts, was paid off and discharged July 
26, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



227 



Seventeenth Regiment 


Ma 


ssa 


chn 


setl 


:s Infantry. 










OS 
43 
m 

■o 
c 

03 

s 


a 
3 


Companies. 


CO 

Soo 

to r* 

el 
C 
& 






A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


GO 

« 

O 

H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 


1 


2 


2 
16 

1 
19 


2 
3 


l 

12 


2 
11 


2 
2 


3 
10 


14 


4 

8 

15 
27 


3 
3 

6 
12 


4 

7 
11 


1 


19 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


3 
84 


Totals, 


1 


2 


5 


2 

15 


12 
25 


7 
11 


13 


1 
15 


1 


87 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


51 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


3 
154 






























157 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1862. 

May 22, New Berne, N. C, , 
Dec. 17, Goldsboro', N. C, . 



1864. 

Feb. 1, Batchelder's Creek, 

N. C. 
April 27, Washington, N. C, . 



1865. 

March 8-10, Wise's Fork, N. C, 
near Kinston, N. C. 



- 


- 


2 


1 
1 


1 


2 


2 


1 
2 


- 


1 
3 


3 


- 


- 



2 

2 

10 



Present also at Kinston and Whitehall. 



228 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Eighteenth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. James Barnes, Bvt. Maj. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(2) Col. Joseph Hates, Bvt. Maj Gen. U. S. Vols. 





00 

c 

5 

E 


a5 

c 

3 


•a 
c 

K 


Companies. 


00 

8 2 

2 
& 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


ED 

O 


Number on regimental rolls , — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


17 
12 


51 


23 


134 
1 


127 


129 


127 


133 


136 


131 


113 


140 


118 

1 

1 


10 


68 

1,333 




7 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


3 
1 


1 
1 


3 

2 


3 


- 


1,401 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment » 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


20 
6 


Totals, .... 


7 

17 
5 


51 


23 


1 
133 


127 


129 


1 

126 


1 

132 


4 
132 


2 

129 


5 
108 


3 

137 


2 
116 


10 


26 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, 1 . 


68 

1,307 


Totals 














t 








1,375 



1 Including non-commiBsioned staff. 



The 18th Mass. Infantry was recruited in July and August, 1861, and on August 26 left the State as a battalion of 
eight companies, in command of Col. (afterwards brigadier general) James BarneB, a graduate of West Point. The 
two additional companies necessary to complete the regiment joined the command in September and November, 
1861. The regiment, forming part of Martindale'e Brigade, Porter's Division, 3d Corps, Army of the Potomac, was 
stationed for a time near Fort Corcoran, and September 26 was ordered to Hall's Hill, where it remained until the 
spiing of 1862. In March, 1862, it moved to the Peninsula, and April 5 took part in the assault at Yorktown and was 
active during the siege; after the surrender the regiment moved by the way of West Point and White House to 
Gaines's Mill, and, arriving May 26, went into camp. June 26, detached from the brigade and forming part of the 
force under General Stoneman, it was ordered to White House, and moved later by the way of Fortress Monroe and 
the James River to Harrison's Landing, where it arrived July 2. Under command of Capt. Stephen Thomas, the 
regiment took part in the battle of ManaBsas August 30, with great loss. It was engaged nt Antietara September 17, 
and in the action at Shephei dstown September 20. At the battle of Fredericksburg, as part of Griffin's Division, 5th 
Corps, the regimeut was closely engaged on the afternoon of December 13 in a charge upon Marye's Heights, and 
occupied an advanced position December 14. 

The regiment moved to Chancellorsville April 30, 1863, taking part in the battle on May 2 and 3. It was engaged 
July 2 and 3 at Gettysburg, and took part in the engagement at Rappahannock Station November 7. It was active 
later in the Mine Run campaign, and encamped for the winter at Beverly Ford. As part of the 3d Brigade, 1st 
Division, 5th Corps, the regiment went into action at the Wilderness on the morning of May 5, 1861, was engaged at 
Laurel Hill May 8, was active in the movements and engagements at Spotsylvania and Noith Anna, and was closely 
engaged at Cold Harbor June 1, taking part in the movements of the following days. It crossed the James River 
June 16 and served at Petersburg during the assault of June 18-21, and engaged in the siege during the lemainder of 
its service. The regiment left the front July 20, 1864, and those whose term of service had expired returned to 
Massachusetts and were mustered out September 2. The re-enlisted men and recruits, forming a battalion under 
command of Capt. Luther S. Bent, remained in service before Petersburg. On October 26, the officers' term of ser- 
vice having expired, the command was consolidated with the 32d Mass. Infantry. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



229 



Eighteenth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 










in 
3 

a 


<y 

3 


■a 
c 


Companies. 


if 

33 

B 

1 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


CO 

O 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


- 


9 




11 


10 


14 


8 


13 


15 


12 


12 


7 


9 


1 


9 
112 




% 




2 


9 


5 


16 


6 


5 


8 


7 


6 


8 


9 


1 


121 


Died by accident or disease, — 
Enlisted men, . 


2 
81 




- 


11 


2 


5 
25 


3 
18 


3 
33 


4 
18 


4 
22 


4 
27 


2 
21 


3 
21 


5 
20 


3 
21 




Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


36 


Total losses, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


11 

229 


Totals 






















240 



Casualizes by Engagements. 



1862. 

Aug. 30, Manassas (or Bull 

Run 2d) , Va. 
Sept. 20, Shepherdstown, 
t Va. (or Black- 
' ford's Ford). 
Dec. 13, Fredericksburg, 
Va. 
Place unknown, . 

1863. 

May 1-3, Chancellorsville, 

Va. 
July 2, Gettysburg, Pa , . 
Nov. 7, Rappahannock 

Station, Va. 

1864. 

May 8-11, Spotsylvania 

(Laurel Hill), 

Va. 

June 1-12, Cold Harbor, Va., 

June 2-3, Bethesda Church, 

June 22-26, Before Petersburg, 

Va. 




3 
3 

1 

1 

1 


j. 


5 
4 

2 


8 
1 

1 


8 
3 

1 
2 


6 

1 
1 


7 
1 

1 
1 


9 
4 

1 
1 


4 

2 

1 

1 
1 

1 
2 


1 

2 
1 

1 

5 

1 


4 
1 

2 


6 
1 

1 
1 


1 


54 
5 

27 

1 

1 

2 
5 

9 
5 

4 
5 
3 



Present also at Yorktown, Antietam and Weldon Railroad. 



230 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Nineteenth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Edivaed W. Hincks, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Army. 

(2) Col. Arthur F. Devereux, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(3) Col. Ansel D. Wass, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





•a 
3 
2 


a 
3 


■6 

3 
pq 


COMPANIES. 


» s 

S S 

a 
c 
£> 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


8 

o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


18 
23 


94 


27 


188 


171 


170 


128 


167 


176 


184 


253 


144 


161 


45 


112 

1,837 


Totals, .... 


15 


- 


- 


7 
3 


4 


3 
1 


- 


2 
1 


5 
6 


5 
3 


5 
1 


2 
2 


9 
4 


1,949 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


57 
21 


Totals, .... 


15 

18 

8 


94 


27 


10 

178 


4 
167 


4 
166 


128 


3 
164 


11 

165 


8 
176 


6 

247 


4 
140 


13 
148 


45 


78 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, 1 . 


112 

1,759 


Totals, .... 
























1,871 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 19th Maes. Infantry was recruited at Lynnrield, Mass., having for a nucleus three companies of the 3d Bat- 
talion Rifles. Seven additional -companies from the vicinity of Boston being soon added, the regiment left the 
State August 28, under Col. Edward W. Hincks (then Hinks), who had served as colonel of the 8th Infantry, 
M. V. M., during its three months' service. It was stationed in camp near Washington until ordered to Poolesville, 
Md., September 12, and assigned to General Lander's Brigade. It took part at Ball's Bluff October 21, and remained 
engaged in guarding the upper Potomac until the spring of 1862. lu March the regiment, as part of General Sedg- 
wick's forces moved to the Shenandoah valley ; returning to Washington March 25, it joined General McCIellan's 
forces on the Peninsula, being assigned to the 3d Brigade, Sedgwick's Division, 2d Corps, Army of the Potomac. 
It went into action before Torktown April 7, and took part in the siege. After the surrender it engaged at West 
Point, and moved then to the Chickahominy River and encamped, engaging iu June in the seven days' battles, losing 
heavily at Glendale. 

At the battle of Antietam, forming part of Sedgwick's Division, the regiment took part in the charge on the 
morning of September 17, losing very heavily. At Fredericksburg, under command of Capt. H. G. O. Weymouth, 
it volunteered fo.r duty in the crossing of the river and the attack in the streets of Fredericksburg, December 11. 

The regiment moved May 2, 1863, to take part in the spring campaign, and at the battle of Chancellorsville, May 
3, was engaged as part of General Sedgwick's forces at Marye's Heights and Fredericksburg. At Gettysburg it 
was engaged July 2 and also during Picketts' charge on the afternoon of July 3, when it captured the flags of four 
Virginia regiments. Moving into Virginia with the army, it took part in the engagements about the Rappahannock 
and in the Mine Run Campaign. 

During the winter of 1863-64 many members of the regiment re-enlisted for another term of service. It was engaged 
at the Battle of the Wilderness, May 6, 1804, as part of Gibbon's Division, 2d Corps, and was active in the movements 
at Spotsylvania, North Anna and Cold Harbor. Crossing the James River June 14, it took part at the assault of 
Petersburg, losing many from the regiment ns prisoners on June 22. Participating afterward in the siege, it shared in 
the engagements at Deep Bottom, Weldon Railroad, Boydtown Plank Road and Hatcher's Run and was active in the 
final operations about Petersburg in March and April, 1865. It engaged in the pursuit of the Confederates to Appo- 
mattox, and encamped after the surrender at Burksville, Va., until May, when it returned to the vicinity of Wash- 
ington. On June 30, 1865, it was mustered out of service, and, returning to Massachusetts, received its final discharge 
and payment July 20, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



231 



Nineteenth. Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 





to 

3 
en 

•a 

c 

« 

'3 

E 


a 
3 


Companies. 


-si 

6>s 

|M 

3 

n 
P 






A 
14 


B 


C 


D 


B 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men 


2 


12 


19 


13 


8 


19 


11 


16 


16 


8 


11 
2 
3 
2 

18 


- 


14 
135, 




2 

2 
2 


12 


7 

8 

29 


6 

3 

28 


10 

6 

29 


11 

3 

22 


7 

6 

32 


1 

9 

21 


7 

5 

28 


2 

9 

9 

36 


4 

2 

14 


4 
1 
5 


149 


Missing, . . ... 

Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 

Died as prisoners, — 

Enlisted men', .... 

Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men,> . . . . 


— T 

71 

54 

14 

264 


Totals, 
























278 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



Casualties by Engagements. 



June 25, 

June 30. 

July 1, 

Sept. 17, 
Dec. 11-14, 



July 
Nov. 



3, 
27, 



May 5-10, 
May 10-12, 
May 24, 
May 31, 
June 3-7, 
June 18-19, 
June 22, 

Aug. 25, 



Feb. 



5, 



1863. 

Fair Oaks or Oak 

Grove, Va. 
Glendale, or White Oak 

Swamp, Va. 
Malvern Hill, Va., 
Autietam, Md., . 
Fredericksburg, Va., . 
Place unknown, . 

I 1863. 

Gettysburg, Pa., . 
Robinson's Cross 

Roads, Va. 
Place unknown, . 

1864. 

Wilderness, Va., . . 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
North Anna River, Va., 
Totopotomoy, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., . 
Jerusalem Plank Road, 

Va. 
Deep Bottom, Va., 
Place unknown, . 

1865. 

Hatcher's Run, Va., . 
Place unknown, . 



1 
1 

1 


1 
1 

1 

2 

2 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 


2 

2 
4 

1 

1 

2 
2 


1 

3 

7 
4 

1 
1 

1 
1 


2 
3 

1 

2 

1 

2 
1 


1 

2 
1 

2 

1 

1 


2 

2 
4 
1 
3 

1 

1 

1 
2 

1 
1 


1 
5 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 


3 
6 

3 

1 

3 


6 

3 
3 

2 
2 

1 

1 


1 

2 
1 
2 

1 

1 


4 

1 

2 

1 

'1 

1 

1 
2 


- 



32 

3 
18 

22 
19 



12 
1 



3 
6 
2 

1 
4 
2 
1 

1 
9 



2 
2 



Present also at Ball's Bluff, Yorktown, West Point, Peach Orchard, Savage's Station, Manassas, Chan- 
cellorsville, Bristoe's Station, Mine Run, Reams' Station, Boydtown Road, Vaughan Road, Farmville, 
Sailor's Creek and Appomattox. 



232 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Twentieth Begiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. William R. Lee, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(2) Col. Francis W. Palfrey, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(3) Col. Paul J. Revere, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(4) Col. George N. Macy, Bvt Maj. Gen U. S. Vols. 





id 

to 

■3 

3 
S 

S 


c 
3 


i 

3 j 

« ! 


COJIPANIES. 


fi 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


03 

3 

o 

u 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


25 
16 


92 


24 


258 


225 


220 


216 


217 


247 


245 


221 


243 


229 


38 


117 
2,399 


Totals, .... 


4 


- 


- 


2 

2 


4 
1 


3 
1 


4 


217 


6 

6 

241 


4 
1 


3 

1 


4 
4 


2 


38 




Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


36 
10 


Totals, .... 


4 

25 
12 


92 


24 


4 
254 


5 
220 


4 
216 


4 
212 


5 
240 


4 
217 


8 
235 


2 
227 


46 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


117 
2,353 


Totals, .... 
























2,470 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 20th Mass. Infantry was recruited at Readville, Mass., in July and August, 1861. The officers having been 
mustered in during July and the main body of the regiment August 28, the command left the State September 4 under 
Col. William Raymond Lee, a graduate of West Point. Aa it was not yet recruited to the maximum, two officers 
remained in Massachusetts for further recruiting. The regiment was sent to Poolesville, Md., and took au active 
part at Ball's Bluff October 21, crossing the river at Harrison's Island about noon of that day and engaging in the 
battle of the afternoon with great loss. Colonel Lee was made prisoner and Lieutenant-Colonel Palfrey took charge 
of the regiment. Under his command it moved to the Shenandoah valley in March, 1862 ; returning to Washington, 
it embarked for the Peninsula, becoming part of Sumner's Corps, Army of the Potomac. It was engaged during 
the siege of Yorktown, took part at the battle of Fair Oaks May 31, at Allen's Farm, Savage's Station, Glendale 
and Malvern Hill, engaging again at Malvern Hill AugUBt 4. Colonel Lee had rejoined the regiment just before the 
surrender of Yorktown. 

The regiment, as part of Sedgwick's Division, joined in the charge in support of the 1st and 12th Corps on the 
morning of September 17 at Antietam. At Fredericksburg it formed part of the volunteer foice to cross the river 
and advance into the town on the morning of December 11, engaging again on the 13th. It was iu action at Chan- 
cellorsville May 3, 1863, and was engaged at Gettysburg July 2 (when Colonel Revere was mortally -wounded), and 
took part again during Pickett's charge on the afternoon of July 3. While in winter quartern, at Stevensburg, Va., 
173 members of the regiment enlisted for another term of service. As part of the 2d Corps, the regiment shared in 
the engagements at the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, North Anna and Cold Harbor, engaging iu the assault of Petersburg 
and in the siege. On July 18, 1864, those whose term of service had cxpiied returned to Massachusetts and were mus- 
tered out. About 200 men were added to the regiment from the 15th Mass. Infantry, and it continued in service in 
the trenches, under command of Major Patten. At Reams' Station, August 25, nearly all the members of the regi- 
ment were taken prisoners. Its ranks much depleted, it took part in the final operations about Petersburg, and, 
following the Confederates to Farmville and Appomattox, encamped, after the surrender, at Burke's Station, Va. 
Takiug pait in the grand review at Washiugton May 23, it encamped uear the Capitol until its muster out ou July 15, 
and, returning to Massachusetts, it received its final discharge and payment July 28, I860. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



233 





Twentieth 


Regiment Massachusetts Infantry 


• 












ta 

•a 

e 

OS 

S 
© 

i4 


3 


Companies. 


CO 

•a y 
c 3 

c 






A 


B 


C 


D 


B 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


00 

"3 
o 
H 


Killed and died of v. 
Officers, . 
Enlisted men, . 


"Minds, — 
disease, — 


4 


10 


25 


12 


16 


31 


16 

4 
3 


28 


19 


29 


34 


19 




14 
229 




4 


i 
2 

12 


2 
12 


6 


1 

11 


4 


4 


1 

8 


5 


2 
4 

11 
51 


7 

5 
31 


4 


243 


Missing, . 


10 


Died by accident or 
Officers, . 
Enli i.ed men, . 


2 
68 




13 
52 


8 
26 


4 
32 


2 

37 


7 
30 


1 
33 


11 
39 


4 
38 


3 

7 


70 


Died as prisoners, — 
Enlisted men, . 


69 


Total losses, — 
Officers, . 
Enlisted men, . 


16 
376 


Totals, . 




















392 





Casualties by Engagements. 
















1861. 

Oct. 21, Ball's Bluff, Va., 
Place unknown, 

1863. 

May 31-June 1, Fair Oaks, Va., . 
June 30, Glendale, Va., . 
Sept. 17, Antietam, Md., . 
Dec. 11-13, Fredericksburg, Va., . 
Place unknown, 

1863. 

May 3, Chancellorsville, Va., 
July 2-3, Gettysburg, Pa., 

Place unknown, 
1864. 

May 6-12, Wilderness, Va., 
May 10-18, Spotsylvania, Va., . 
June 3-9, Cold Harbor, Va., 
June 21-22, Petersburg, Va , 
June 23-24, Before Petersburg, Va., 
Aug. 5, Before Petersburg,Va , 
Aug. 14-17, Deep Bottom, Va., . 
Oct. 18, Petersburg, Va., 
Oct. 29, Hatcher's Itun, Va., . 
Place unknown, 

1865. 


1 

1 
1 

1 


1 

1 

2 

1 

2 

2 

1 


7 

2 

1 
2 

4 
1 

3 

1 
3 

1 
2 


2 
2 

2 
2 

2 

1 


1 
1 
2 

2 

5 

: 1 

1 

1 

1 

2 


10 

7 

8 
1 

2 
1 
1 

1 


2 
1 

1 
• 3 

1 

3 

2 

6 

1 

1 


3 
4 

4 

5 

4 

1 

1 
2 

1 
3 


7 
1 

1 

3 

4 

1 

1 

1 


3 
1 

1 

3 
1 
3 

1 
2 

1 

11 

2 


4 
1 

1 

2 

2 

14 

5 

1 

2 
1 
1 

2 


2 
2 
5 

1 

2 
2 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 


- 


34 

4 

4 

7 

17 

35 

12 

1 
38 

1 
15 

39 
9 
8 

4 
3 

1 
2 
1 
1 
16 

1 



Present also at Yorktown, West Point, Peach Orchard, Savage's Station, Malvern Hill, Chantilly, Mine 
Run, North Anna River, Totopotomoy, Strawberry Plains, Reams's Station, Sailor's Creek, Farmville 
and Appomattox. 



234 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Twenty-first Kegiment Massachusetts Infantry. 
(1) Col. Augustus Morse. (2) Col. "William S. Clark. 





Sri 
a 

in 

■a 

c 

3 

o 

S 


s 

3 


c 

pa 


Companies. 


en 

teg 

03 

a 

to 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


60 

"3 
o 
EH 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


18 
19 


58 


25 


111 

5 
2 

7 

104 


110 


110 


100 


119 


102 


115 


107 


117 


129 


29 


76 
1,193 




9 

9 

18 
10 


- 


- 


3 
1 


2 
1 


4 


3 

2 


1 
1 


3 

4 


2 
1 


3 
1 


2 
2 
4 

125 


1,269 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


37 

15 


Totals, .... 


58 


25 


4 
106 


3 
107 


4 

96 


5 

114 


2 
100 


7 
108 


3 

104 


4 
113 


29 


52 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


76 
1,141 


Totals, .... 






















1,217 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 21st Mass. Infantry was organized during July and August, 1861, in camp at Worcester, Mass., and was 
mustered into service on varying dates from August 16 to the 23d, when It left the State in command of Col. Au- 
gustus Morse, and, remaining in Baltimore a few days, moved on the 29th to Annapolis, Md., and encamped. On 
September 17 the regiment was remustered. Iu command of Lieutenant-Colonel Maggi, and forming part of Gen- 
eral Reno's brigade, it sailed January 9 for North Carolina in the Burnside expedition. It suffered loss *in the 
charge and capture of the enemy's works at the battle of Roanoke Island February 8, was closely engaged at New 
Berne March 14, and took part in the expedition to Camden April 17-22. The regiment moved with its brigade to 
Newport News July 6, becoming part of the 2d Brigade, Reno's Division, 9th Army Corps. Joining General Pope's 
forces at the Rapidan, it engaged at Manassas August 30, and met heavy loss at Chantilly September 1. It was 
engaged at South Mountain and Antietam, and was active at Fredericksburg, encamping afterward at Falmouth, Va. 
Leaving camp Feb 9, 1863, the regiment moved to Kentucky, to serve as part of the 9th Corps in the department of 
the Ohio, and went into camp at Mt. Sterling, Ky., April 3, moving in July to Lexington and in August to Camp 
Nelson on the Kentucky River. On September 12 it left camp for Knoxville, Tenn , and engaged in action at Blue 
Springs October 10 and at Campbell's Station November 16. During the siege of Knoxville it took part in a charge on 
the morning of November 24. While encamped near Rutledge, Tenn., after the raising of the siege, all but 24 of the 
members of the regiment re-enlisted for another term, and January 7 left camp to spend their furlough in Massachu- 
setts. Leaving the State March 18, on its return to duty the command joined the 9th Corps at Annapolis and became 
part of the 2d brigade, General Stevenson's division. It took part at the Wilderness May 6 and was active at Spot- 
sylvania May 10, 12 and 18; it shared in the movements to North Anna and in the engagements at Cold Harbor. 
Reaching the vicinity of Petersburg June 16, it took part in the assault on that day and was closely engaged 
again on the 17th. The regiment shared afterward in the duties of the siege, taking part with its division in the 
charge at the " Crater " July 30. On August 22 those whose term of service had expired returned to Massachusetts 
and were muBtered out Aug. 30, 1864. The remainder, as a battalion of three companies, under command of Capt. 
Orange S. Sampson, still serving in the trenches, engaged in action at the Weldon Railroad in August, and at Poplar 
Spring Church on September 30, when Captain Sampson was killed. On Oct. 21, 1864, the command was transferred 
to the 36th Mass. Iufantry by order of the War Department. '<> 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



235 



Twenty-first Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 










id 
5 

■a 

5 


c 

3 


•a 

c 

es 

a 


Companies. 


to 
•a- 
SS 
§i 

1 
6 

|3 






A 


BJC 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


n 

3 

a 
Eh 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


1 


10 




11 
6 


17 


18 


15 


15 


8 j 14 


11 


17 


15 




11 
141 


Totals, .... 


1 


2 


1 


4 


4 


3 


10 


9 


6 


9 


9 


15 


2 


152 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, . 


2 
78 




12 


1 


1 
18 


3 
24 


1 
23 


1 
19 


25 


17 


2 
22 


20 


1 
27 


30 


2 


80 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


9 


Total losses, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


13 
228 


Totals, .... 






























241 







Casualties by Engagements. 
















1862. 

Feb. 8, Roanoke Island, 

N. C. 
Mar. 14, New Berne, N. C, 
April 19, Camden, N. C, . 
Sept. 1, Chantilly, Va., . 
Sept. 17, Antietam, Md., . 
Dec. 13, Fredericksburg, 
Va. 
Place unknown, . 

1863. 

Nov. 24-29, SieseofKnoxville, 
. Tenn. 

* 1864. 

May 6, Wilderness, Va., . 

May 12-18, Spotsylvania, Va., 

May 31-June 1, Shady Grove 
Church, Va. 

June 2, Cold Harbor (Beth- 
esda Church), 
Va. 

June 16-17, Petersburg, Va., . 

June 29- July 23, Before Peters- 
burg, Va. 

July 30, Crater, Petersburg, 
Va. 

Aug. 19, Weldon Railroad, 

Sept. 30, Poplar Spring 
Church, Va. 
Place unknown, . 


1 


1 

5 

1 

1 
1 
1 


- 


2 
3 
1 

1 

1 

2 
1 


3 

3 
1 

2 

4 

2 
2 


4 

3 
2 
5 

1 
1 

1 
1 


3 

6 
2 

1 

1 
2 


2 

3 
2 
2 

1 

2 

1 
1 

1 


1 
3 

1 

1 
2 


2 

r 

i 

2 
1 

1 

1 

2 

2 

1 


4 
2 
1 
1 

1 
2 


3 

7 
1 
2 

1 

1 

1 

1 


1 

4 

1 
2 
1 

1 

1 
2 

1 
1 


™" 


13 

23 
4 
39 
10 
12 

1 

4 

3 
5 
3 

12 

5 
3 

5 

4 
4 

2 



Present also at Manassas or Bull Run 2d, South Mountain, Blue Springs, Campbell's Station, North 

Anna River and Hatcher's Run. 



236 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Twenty-second Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Henry Wilson. 

(2) Col. Jesse A. Gove. 

(3) Col. Charles E. Griswold. 

(4) Col. William S. Tilton, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





3 

CO 

13 

C 

a 

s 

E 


C 

►3 


T3 
C 
« 


Companies. 


GO 

o p 






A 


B 


C 


D 


B 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


3 

o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


15 
10 


63 


26 


127 

5 
1 


128 


141 


130 


131 


129 


140 


143 


139 


128 


8 


78 
1,380 


Totals, .... 


2 


- 


- 


5 
1 


2 


2 
1 


1 


2 


4 


3 

1 


3 


1 
1 

2 
126 


- 


1,458 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
regiment. 


30 
5 


Totals, .... 


2 

15 
8 


63 


26 


6 
121 


6 
122 


2 
139 


3 

127 


1 
130 


2 

127 


4 
136 


4 
139 


3 

136 


8 


35 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


78 
1,345 


























1,423 



Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 22d Mass. Infantry was raised through the efforts of Senator Henry Wilson, who became its colonel for a 
short time. Many of the companies were recruited by men who had just returned from three months' service in the 
militia regiments. The 2d Co. Sharpshooters was attached to the regiment during its service. Oct. 8, 1861, the regi- 
ment left the State for Washington, and on the 13th was stationed in camp at Hall's Hill, where it remained until the 
spring of 1862. Col. Henry Wilson resigned Oct. 29, 1861, and Jesse A. Gove, captain of the 10th U. S. Infantry, was 
appointed in his place. March 21 the regiment sailed for Fortress Monroe, to take part in the Peninsular campaign. 
It was active in the assault of Yorktown April 5, engaging afterward in the siege; after the surrender of the city it 
moved by the way of West Point and Cumberland Landing to White House, and May 26 reached Gaines's Mill and 
encamped, taking part the nest day in the battle of Hanover Court House. Assigned to the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 
5th Corps, the regiment was engaged at Mechanicsville June 26, taking part the next day in the battle of Gaines's 
Mill, in which it suffered great loss and in which Colonel Gove was killed, Captain Sampson taking his place in com- 
mand of the regiment. It was in action at Malvern Hill July 1, under Capt. David K. Wardwell, and arrived at Har- 
rison's Landing July 2. The regiment was iu action near Manassas August 29, and, forming for a time part of the 
2d Brigade, moved August 30 to Centreville. It engaged at the battle of Autietam, and took part in the action at 
Shepherdstown September 20. At Fredericksburg it occupied an advanced position during December 13 and 14. 
The regiment was engaged at Chancellorsville May 3, 1863, and took part in the cavalry battle at Aldie in June. It 
was engaged at Gettysburg near Round Top on the afternoon of July 2, and was active on the 3d and 4th. In the 
autumn it took part at the battle of Rappahannock Station and in the Mine Run campaign, encamping for the winter 
near Beverly Ford. At the battle of the Wilderness the regiment was closely engaged on May 5 and again May 7, 
taking part at Laurel Hill and Spotsylvania and engaging at North Anna, Totopotomoy and Bethesda Church. Mov- 
ing to Petersburg, it took active part in the assault of June 18, and engaged afterward in the siege. August 8 the 
regiment w;ib ordered to City Point for guard duty at the government machine and repair shops, and remained so 
stationed until the termination of its service, Oct. 5, 1864, when it returned to Massachusetts, reaching Boston 
October 10, and was mustered out Oct. 17, 1864. Many members of the regiment had re-enlisted, and were assigned 
to the 32d Mass. Infantry. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



237 



Twenty-second Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 





3 

GO 

•a 

c 

05 

■O 
.— » 
OJ 

£ 


c 

3 


Companies. 


00 

■CJ3 

.Is 

3 

G 






A 
28 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P G 


H 


I 


K 


DO 

3 

o 


lulled and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 


8 


15 


10 


20 


20 


17 


14 


16 


• 

15 


20 





9 

175 


Totals, 


1 




5 


9 


9 


1 
2 


11 


10 


6 


12 


11 


6 


184 


Missing, 


1 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Enlisted men," .... 


2 

82 




1 
1 


10 


3 
36 


24 


3 

22 


5 

28 


1 
32 


2 
29 


2 
22 


3 
31 


1 

27 


1 

27 


- 


84 


Died as prisoners, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


21 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men,' .... 


11 
279 




























290 



Including non-commissioned staff. 





Casualties by Engagements. 
















1863. 

April 6, Yorktown, Va., . 
May 4, Near York River, Va., 
June 26, Mechanicsville, Va., . 
June 27, Gaines's Mill, Va., 
July 1, Malvern Hill, Va., 
Sept. 20, Shepherdstown, Va., . 
Oct. 13, Near Sharpsburg, Md., 
Dec. 12-13, Fredericksburg, Va., . 

1863. 

July 2-3, Gettysburg, Pa., . 
Nov. 7, Rappahannock Station, 
Va. 
Place unknown, . 

1864. 

May 5-6, Wilderness, Va., . 

May 8-14, Spotsylvania (Laurel 
Hill), Va. 

May 23, North Anna River, Va., 

May 30, Bethesda Church or 
Totopotomoy, Va. 

June 3, Cold Harbor ( Bethesda 
Church or Totopoto- 
moy, Va.). 

June 18, Petersburg, Va., . 

Aug. 21-Sept. 17, Before Petersburg, 
Va. 
Place unknown, . 


1 


3 
1 

1 

1 

1 
1 


15 
1 

3 

6 

1 

2 


6 
1 
1 

3 

1 

1 

1 

1 


4 

2 
1 

3 


10 

1 

2 
1 

2 
1 

1 

2 


8 
4 

1 

1 
5 

1 


5 

1 

2 
2 

3 

1 
2 

1 


1 
2 
6 
1 

2 
1 

1 


• 1 

7 
1 

1 

1 

2 

2 
1 


4 
1 

1 

1 

3 
2 

2 
1 


1 
9 
2 

2 

2 
4 


- 


1 
1 
3 
78 
11 
1 
1 
7 

12 
2 

1 

+ 12 
28 

2 
4 

8 

8 
2 

2 



Present also at Hanover Court House, Manassas or Bull Run, 2d, Antietam, Chancellorsville, Mine Run, 

Little River and Jericho Ford. 



238 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Twenty-third Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 
(1) Col. John Kurtz. (2) Col. Andrew Elwell. 





a 

"2 
3 
2 


c5 

c 

3 


■a 

a 


Companies. 


DO 

|3 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 

1 


o5 

3 

o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, 1 . 


16 
21 


79 


20 


124 


120 


116 


123 


125 


128 


147 


129 


124 


119 


3 


95 
1,299 




9 


- 


5 
1 


3 
2 


6 


6 

4 


4 
1 


3 
2 


5 


3 

2 


3 
1 


2 
3 


- 




Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


49 
16 


Totals, .... 


9 

16 

12 


79 


20 


6 
118 


5 
115 


6 
110 


10 
113 


5 
120 


5 
123 


5 
142 


5 
124 


4 
120 


5 
114 


3 


65 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


95 
1,234 


Totals, .... 






























1,329 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 23d Maes. Infantry was organized during the summer and autumn of 1861, many of the companies being 
recruited by men who had returned from three months' service in the militia regiments. Under Col. John Kurtz 
the regiment left the State Kov. 11, 1861, for Annapolis, Md., and was mustered into the United States service 
December 5, a portion of the men having been mustered as early as September 28. FormiDg part of Foster's Brigade 
and taking part in General Burnside's expedition to North Carolina, it was engaged at the battle of Roanoke Mand 
February 8, and took part, with loss, at New Berne March 14, 1862. Forming part of the 1st Brigade under 
Col. T. J. C. Amory, and assigned to General Foster's Division, the regiment was stationed at New Berne until 
November, serving during a part of April and May at Batcbelder's Creek. Five companies took part in the 
Tarboro' expedition in November. In December the regiment took part in the Goldsboro' expedition, being present 
at the battle of KinBton and engaged with great loss at Whitehall. It left New Berne in January, 1863, to take part 
in the movement agaiust Charleston, S. C, but returned to North Carolina in April, having spent a month iu camp 
at St. Ilelena Island and much of the remaining time on transports. It remained encamped near New Berne, engaging 
in picket duty and reconnoitering expeditions, during the summer and autumn of 1863. On October 16 it sailed for 
Fortress Monroe and went into camp near Newport News; while here over 200 members of the regiment re-enlisted, 
and in January returned to Massachusetts for furlough. The regiment moved to Portsmouth in January, 1861, en- 
gaging under command of Colonel Elwell iu an expedition to Smithfield in April. As part of Heckman's Red Star 
Brigade, and serving with General Butler's forces at Bermuda Hundred, it was present at the engagement at 
Walthal Junction and active at ArrowRcld Church; it took part early in the morning of May 16 at Drewry's Bluff, 
with great loss; Lieutenant-Colonel Chambers was mortally wounded, Captain Raymond taking command of the 
regiment. It formed part of the forces sent to join the Army of the Potomac, and, reaching Cold Harbor June 1, 
took active part in the operations there, moving afterward to Petersburg, and taking part in the siege. On September 
4 it was ordered to New Berne and stationed on the south side of the Trent River. On September 26 those of the 
regiment whose term of service had expired were ordered to Massachusetts for muster out. In March, 1865, the 
regiment took part in a movement into the interior, engaged with loss at Kinston, and was stationed near the town 
on the Neuse River until ordered to New Berne, May 2; here, on June 25, 1865, it was mustered out of service, and, 
returning to Massachusetts, received its final discharge and payment at Readville, Mass., July 12. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



239 



Twenty-third Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 





■ 

(0 

T3 

e 

cS 

■d 
% 

E 


.5 


Companies. 


■gf 

U a, 

s 

c 






A 


B 


C 


D 


B 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


O 

H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, .... 


2 


2 


6 


10 


4 


10 


11 


5 


6 


7 


12 


2 




4 
73 


Totals, 


2 
2 


- 


7 


8 


13 


3 


9 


7 


6 


8 


9 


10 

3 
15 


2 


77 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


2 
84 




4 
2 


2 


13 


5 
23 


4 
21 


3 
16 


4 
24 


14 
26 


15 

27 


4 

19 


1 
22 


2 


86 


Died as prisoners, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


53 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


6 
210 






• 






















216 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1862. 

Feb. 8, Roanoke Island, N. C, . 
March 14, New Berne, N. C , . 
April 29, Batchelder's Creek, N.C. 

(Picket) 
Dec. 14, Kinston, N. C, 
Dec. 16, Whitehall, N. C, . 

1864. 

April 14, Smithfield, Va., 
May 14, Palmer's Creek, Va , 
May 16, Drewry's Bluff, Va., 
June 3, Cold Harbor, Va., . 
July 20-30, Petersburg, Va , . 

Place unknown, 

1865. 

March 8, Wise's Fork (Kinston), 
N. C. ' 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 

1 

2 
1 

1 


2 
1 

4 
1 
1 


2 
1 

1 


2 
1 

1 
3 
1 

1 


1 
4 

1 
4 


1 

2 

1 
1 


2 
1 

1 

2 


2 
2 

2 
1 


3 

1 

4 
1 
3 


1 

1 


r 


3 

13 

1 

1 
16 

2 
1 

17 

11 

6 

1 

1 

4 



Present also at Rawles' Mills, Goldsboro', Wilcox Bridge, Winton, Heckman's Farm and Arrowfield 

Church. 



240 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Twenty-fourth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Thomas G. Stevenson, Brig. Gen. TJ. S. Vols. 

(2) Col. Francis A. Osborn, Bvt. Brig. Gen. TJ. S. Vols. 

(3) Col. Albert Ore-way, Bvt. Brig. Gen. TJ. S. Vols. 





•a 
5 
S 


3 


03 


Companies. 


CO 

at 
C 






A 


B 


C 


D 


B 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


BD 

O 

H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


17 
20 


80 


25 


214 


120 


118 


141 


115 


131 


200 


118 


134 


130 


8 
8 


97 
1,474 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


9 


- 


- 


3 

1 


3 
1 


6 
2 


5 


7 
1 


4 


5 
1 


5 
3 


2 
1 


1 
1 


50 
11 


Totals, .... 


9 

17 
11 


80 


25 


4 

210 


4 
116 


8 
110 


5 
136 


8 
107 


4 

127 


6 

194 


8 
110 


3 

131 


2 
128 


61 


Actual totals of members of 
regiment, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


97 
1,413 


Totals 




























1,510 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 24th Mass. Infantry, known as the New England Guards regiment, had as its basis the 4th Battalion M.V. M., 
whose major, Thomas Greel y Stevenson, recruited and organized the regiment at Camp Massasoit, Rendville, Mass., 
during the autumn of 1861, and became its colonel. It left the State Dec. 9, 1861, for Annapolis, Md., and, being 
assigned to Foster's Brigade, joined General Burnside's expedition to North Carolina, sailing for Hatteras Inlet 
Jan. 9, 1862. It was present at the battle of Roanoke Island, February 8, and had an advanced position at New 
Berne, March 14. Occupying headquarters at Camp Lee, the regiment engaged during March in an expedition to 
"Washington, N. C, and in one up the Neuse River. Three companies were sent to Washington again in May; and 
the remainder of the regiment, moving there in June, met the enemy at Tranters Creek June 5; two companies 
again serving on detached duty at Washington, N. C, from July 8 to September 12, took part with loss in the en- 
gagement on September 6. 

The first of November the regiment, with the exception of two companies, left on picket at New Berne, took part 
in the Taiboro' expedition, and engaged in the Goldsboro' expedition in December. On Jan. 29, 1863, the command 
was ordered to St. Helena Island, S. C, and was engaged July 16 and 18 on James and Morris Islands, engaging 
afterward in the siege of Fort Wagner. On August 26 the regiment charged and captured a line of Confederate 
rifle pits, suffering some loss in the engagement. It was transferred to Florida in September, and remained stationed 
at St. Augustine during the autumn and winter of 1863-64; while here more than 400 men re-enlisted for another 
term and returned to Massachusetts for thirty days' furlough. The remainder of the regiment, transferred to 
Jacksonville, met the re-enlisted men at Gloucester Point, Va., May 1, 1864, and, as part of the 10th Army Corps, 
the command moved to Bermuda Hundred. It took part at Drewry's Bluff May 12-16, and, moving with the brigade 
to Deep Bottom, June 20, met heavy loss in the engagement there of August 14-18. Colonel Osborn being in com- 
mand of a brigade, the regiment served under Captain Maker on the 14th and under Captain Gardner on the succeed- 
ing days. On August 26 the regiment took position in front of Petersburg and engaged in the siege. On Dec. 9, 
1864, the last of the men whose term of service under the original enlistment had expired were mustered out. The 
regiment returned to Bermuda Hundred December 18, where it remained encamped until the fall of Petersburg, in 
' April, 1865. Ordered to Richmond, Va., it remained on guard duty in the city until January of the following year, 
having received two officers and 170 enlisted men from the34lhand 14 men from the 40th Mass. Infantry in June, 1864. 
On Jan. 20, 1866, the regiment was mustered out at Richmond, and returned at once to Massachusetts for final dis- 
charge and payment. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



241 



Twenty-fourth. Regiment Massachusetts 


Infantry. 










to 

■a 

3 

2 

E 


C 

3 


•o 

c 

eg 


Companies. 


Bag; 

G 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


J3 

3 

o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 




8 




7 


7 


5 


5 


7 


9 


6 


9 


17 


12 


1 
1 


8 
84 


Totals, .... 






1 


9 


11 


13 


23 


12 


6 


11 


8 


5 


11 


92 


Died by accident or disease, — 
Enlisted men, . 


1 
111 


Totals, .... 


_ 


9 


1 


1 

17 


18 


1 

19 


28 


4 
23 


15 


1 
18 


17 


3 

25 


23 


112 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . . . 


10 


Total losses, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


9 
205 


Totals, .... 




























214 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1862. 

Mar. 14, New Berne, N. C, . 
June 5, Tranter's Creek, N. C, 
Sept. 6, Washington, N. C, . 
Nov. 2, Rawles' Mills, N. C, 
Not. 12, Batchelder's Creek, 
N. C 

1868. 

July 16, James Island, S. C, . 
Aug. 26, Morris Island, S C , 
Dec. 30, St. Augustine, Fla., . 

1864. 

May 16, Drewry's Bluff, Va , 
May 30, Bermuda Hundred, 

Va. 
June 17, Weir Bottom Church, 

Va. 
Aug. 14-16, Deep Bottom, Va , 
Sept. 1-30, Before Petersburg, 

Va. 
Oct. 7, DarbytownB-oad,Va., 
Oct. 13, DarbytownRoad,Va., 
Place unknown, 


- 


1 

1 

3 
3 


- 


2 
2 

2 

1 


3 

1 

1 

1 

1 


2 

1 
2 


1 

1 

3 


1 

\ 

1 
3 

1 

1 


3 
2 

4 


1 
3 

1 


1 

2 
6 


2 
1 

1 

1 
1 

4 
1 

1 
5 


1 
1 

2 

5 

2 
1 


- 


14 
6 
2 
1 

1 

1 

1 
3 
1 

12 
1 

2 

31 ■ 
6 

3 
6 
1 



Present also at Roanoke Island, Kinston, Goldsboro', Fort Wagner, Richmond and Petersburg 

Railroad. 



242 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Twenty-fifth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Edwin Upton. (2) Col. Josiah Pickett, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





Ha 

03 
•+J 

w 
•O 

a 
a 

% 
5 


a 
3 


c 
a 
« 


Companies. 


n 

* 5 

Pa 

OS 

c 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


3 

o 


Number on regimental rolls , — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, 1 . 


18 
17 


59 


25 


131 


121 


147 


165 


149 


122 


118 


127 


121 

2 


116 
4 


14 


77 
1,373 


Totals 


6 


- 


- 


4 
4 


1 
2 


3 


3 


2 
1 


3 

4 


2 


4 

1 


- 


1,450 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment ' 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


34 
12 


Totals, .... 


6 

18 
11 


59 


25 


8 
123 


3 

118 


3 

144 


3 

162 


3 

146 


7 
115 


2 

116 


5 
122 


2 
119 


4 
112 


14 


46 


Actual totals of members of 
regiment, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


77 
1,327 


Totals, .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 




- 


1,404 



Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 25th Mass. Infantry, a Worcester County regiment, was organized at Camp Lincoln, Worcester, largely 
under the charge of Capt. (afterwards lieutenant-colonel) A. B. R. Sprague, in the latter part of September, 1861, 
and was mustered into service on varying dates from September 26 to October 12. Under Col. Edwin Upton the 
regiment left the State October 31, and encamped at Annapolis until, forming part of General Foster's brigade 
in the Bur,nside expedition to North Carolina, it sailed Jan. 9, 1862, for Hatteras Inlet. It took a prominent part 
in the battle of Roanoke Island February 8, and was engaged at New Berne March 14, remaining on provost duty 
in the city UDtil May 9, and afterward occupied headquarters in the vicinity, being stationed on picket at Red House, 
Va., for a few weeks in May, taking part in July in the advance to Trenton, and engaging in an expedition to Plym- 
outh in September. Six companies, under Major Pickett, took part also in the Tarboro' expedition. As part of 
the 3d Brigade, it engaged in the Goldsboro' expedition in December, serving in support of batteries at the battle 
of Kinston, supplying volunteer skirmishers at Whitehall and active at Goldsboro'. The regiment served on garri- 
son duty at Plymouth, N. C., during part of March and the month of April, 1863. In July several companies were 
assigned to picket duty at Washington, N. C. In December the regiment moved to Newport News, Va. ; while there 
432 men re-enlisted, and in February, 1864, returned to Massachusetts on furlough; those who remained being 
temporarily assigned to the 139th N. Y. Infantry, and stationed at Williamsburg. The command was reunited at 
Portsmouth, Va , March 26, and, forming part of General Heckmau's Red Star Brigade, 18th Army Corps, moved to 
Bermuda Hundred, was engaged at Walthall Junction and Arrowfield Church, and met with loss at Drewry's Bluff 
May 16. On May 28 the regiment moved to join the Army of the Potomac, and arrived at Cold Harbor on the after- 
noon of June 1, going at once into action ; it took part in all the movements of the succeeding days, losing heavily on 
June 3. Moving with the army to Petersburg, it took part in the assaults of June 15 and 18, and remained after- 
ward on duty in the trenches until August 25. It was ordered to North Carolina September 4, and stationed near 
New Berne. Those whose term of service had expired left for Massachusetts October 5, and were mustered out 
at Worcester Oct. 20, 1864. The remainder of the regiment moved toward Kinston in March, 1865, engaging at 
Wise's Forks March 10. It united with Sherman's Army at Goldsboro', moved to Raleigh in April and through 
Greensboro' to Charlotte in the early part of May, where it remained encamped until the termination of its service. 
Returning to Massachusetts, it was mustered out at Readville, July 28, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



243 



Twenty-fifth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 





!B 












Companies. 










^3 








o 

3 


■d 


















.!« 

co 23 

CO 






. 1 

A 


B 


C 


D 1 E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


CO 

a! 
O 


Killed and died of wounds, — 


! 






























Officers, .... 


~ 


8 


























8 


Enlisted men, . 


- 


- 


- 


10 


16 


19 


9 


12 


13 


17 


10 


10 


12 


- 


128 














4 


1 


3 


_ 


1 


4 


1 


3 


_ 


136 


Missing, 


17 


Died by accident or disease, — 
Officers 
































Enlisted men, . 


- 


- 


1 


7 


13 


12 


16 


8 


12 


8 


14 


18 


3 


- 


112 


Died as prisoners, — 
































Officers, .... 
































Enlisted men, 








4 


4 




2 


14 


2 


4 


4 


13 


12 




59 


Total losses, — 


































8 


Enlisted men, . 






1 


21 


33 


35 


28 


37 


27 


30 


32 


42 


30 


- 


316 


Totals, .... 






















324 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1862. 

Feb. 8, Roanoke Island, 

N C. 
March 14, New Berne, N. C, 
Dec. 17, Goldsboro', N. C, 
Place unknown, . 



1861. 

May 6, Walthall Junction, 

Va. 

May 9, Petersburg or Ar- 

rowfieldChurch, 
Va 

May 12-14,- Proctor's Creek, 
Va. 

May 11-16, Drewry's Bluff, 
Va. 

June 3, Cold Harbor, Va., 

June 15-19, Petersburg, Va., . 

June 25-Aug. 20, Before Peters- 
burg, Va. 
Place unknown, . 













3 




1 




4 


1 


2 






_ 


— 


" 


1 


2 

- 


1 


_ 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


1 


_ 












2 


1 


- 




1 










- 


1 




- 


1 


- 




4 


2 


1 


- 


3 


2 


" 


_ 


_ 





2 
1 


1 


_ 


— 
2 




2 


4 


2 


1 


7 


_ 


- 


6 

1 


— 


3 

1 


7 
2 


15 
1 
1 


5 

1 
1 


7 

1 


7 
2 


5 
2 
2 


7 


3 
1 


4 
1 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


2 


3 




— 


1 


— 


— 


1 


— 


— 


— 



11 

4 
1 

4 



4 

14 

3 

19 

69 
13 

4 



Present also at Kinston, Whitehall and Wise's Fork. 



244 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Twenty-sixth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 
(1) Col. Edward F. Jones, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. (2) Col. Alpha B. Farr. 





its 
a 

•*. 

OB 

■o 

a 

2 

E 


CD 

3 


B5 


Companies. 


■ 

•is 

-g-3 

DO 






A 


B 


C 


D 


B 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


BO 

"3 
O 

H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


16 
15 


64 


24 


150 


139 


146 


146 


166 


122 


118 


109 


126 


124 


11 


80 
1,396 


Totals, .... 


8 


- 


- 


r 

3 

2 


3 
3 


1 


3 
3 


5 
1 


2 


2 


4 
1 


2 


124 


- 


1,476 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment.' 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
regiment. 


33 
10 


Totals, .... 


8 

16 

7 


64 


24 


5 

145 


6 
133 


1 
145 


6 
140 


6 
160 


2 
120 


2 
116 


5 

104 


2 
124 


11 


43 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


80 
1,353 






























1,433 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 26th Mass. Infantry was recruited by Col. Edward F. Jones, -who had commanded the 6th Infantry M. V.M. 
during its eventful three months' service. Going into camp at Cambridge, Mass., August 28, as the 6th Mass. In- 
fantry, it moved September 23 to Camp Chase, Lowell, where it completed its organization as the 26th Mass. Infantry, 
being mustered into service during September and October, 1861. The regiment was sent to Ship Island, Miss., and, 
arriving December 3, remained in camp until the spring of 1862. In the operations against New Orleans it formed 
part of the force moving to Quarantine, occupied Forts St. Philip and Jackson after their evacuation by the enemy, and, 
stationed at New Orleans itself eaily in July, remained on provost duty until June, 1863. A detachment of the regi- 
ment under Captain Pickering formed part of an expedition across Lake Pontchartrain in September, 1862. On the 
formation of the 19th Army Corps, under General Banks, the regiment became part of the 2d Brigade, 2d Division, 
with Colonel Fair as brigade commander. Still forming part of the force occupying New Orleans, seven companies 
of the regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Sawtell, engaged at La Fourche Crossing, near Thibodeaux, La., June 
21, 1863, and, moving on the 30th, occupied Jefferson Station until relieved, July 15. It took part in the expedition 
to Sabine Pass in September; and, engaging a little later in the T§cbe expedition, moved through Camp Bisland, 
Franklin and New Iberia, to Opelousas, encamping on the return at New Iberia, and moving in January, 1864, to 
Franklin. During the winter nearly two-thirds of the regiment re-enlisted for another term of service, passing the 
time from March 22 to May 4, 1864, on furlough, and, returning, went into camp at Carrollton, La., May 21, moving 
in June to Morganza. Ordered to Bermuda Hundred, the regiment, as part of the 1st Brigade, 2d Division, 19th 
Corps, moved, August 14, toward the Shenandoah valley, encamping on the 16th at Berryville, Va. It took part 
with General Sheridan's army in the movements about CharlestowD, Halltown and Berryville, was engaged with 
Iobb at the battle of Opequon, September 19, and was present at Fisher's Hill. On October 19 those serving under 
the original enlistment left for Massachusetts, to be mustered out. The command, as a battalion of five companies, 
under Captain Chapman, took part at the battle of Cedar Creek October 19, and, being ordered to Winchester, Va., 
December 14, remained on duty there until May 1, 1865. Returning then to Washington, it was sent to Savannah, 
Ga., June 3, and served there on guard and provost duty until the expiration of its service. It was mustered out 
Aug. 26, 1865, and left for Massachusetts September 12, receiving its fiual discharge and payment at Gallop's Island, 
Boston harbor, Sept. 18,. 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



245 



Twenty-sixth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 










id 

$ 

■a 

c 
s 

s 

5 


c 
3 


•a 


Companies. 


00 

.Is 

to " 
09 

n 

& 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


to 

© 
H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


1 


2 




13 


9 


4 


1 


8 




7 


3 


6 


5 




3 
56 


Totals, .... 


1 


3 


1 


20 


12 


> 
13 


21 


12 


14 


14 


13 


26 


15 


1 


59 


Missing, 


1 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men,' . 


3 
163 




1 
1 


5 


1 


2 
35 


2 
24 


1 
18 


1 
23 


20 


14 


2 
23 


4 
20 


2 
34 


1 
21 


1 


166 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


15 


Total losses, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men,' . 


6 

235 
























241 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1863. 
































June 21, La Fourche Crossing, 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 


_ 


_ 


4 


La. 
































1864. 
































Sept. 19, Opequon or Win- 


1 


1 


_ 


12 


9 


3 


_ 


8 


— 


7 


2 


3 


_ 


— 


46 


chester, Va. 
































Oct. 19, Cedar Creek, Va., . 




1 




1 


1 


1 










1 




5 




10 



Present also at Fisher's Hill. 



246 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Twenty-seventh Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

Col. Horace C Lee, Bvt. Brig. U. S. Vols. 





fa' 

03 

•*> 

CO 

•a 

i 

2 

£ 


c 
3 


•a 
c 

03 


Companies. 


GO 

11 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


CO 

"3 
o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


16 
14 

8 


80 


25 


129 

4 

4 
125 


156 


190 


151 


132 


152 


121 


129 


154 


140 


4 


96 

1,497 


Totals, .... 


: 


- 


2 
3 


5 


2 

1 


8 


5 
2 


3 
1 


3 
2 


6 
1 


5 

5 
135 


- 


1,593 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


51 
10 


Totals, .... 


8 

16 
6 


80 


25 


5 
151 


5 
185 


3 

148 


8 
124 


7 
145 


4 

117 


5 

124 


7 
147 


4 


61 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


96 
1,436 


Totals, .... 




























1,532 



Including non-commissioned Bluff. 



The 27th Mass. Infantry was recruited in the western counties of Massachusetts by Horace C. Lee, afterward 
colonel of the regiment, in September and October, 1861. Most of the men being mustered in September 27, and the 
line officers on October 25, it left the State Nov. 2, 1861, and encamped near Annapolis, Md. It was assigned to the 
1st Brigade, General Burnside's forces, November 27, and, leaving Fortress Monroe for South Carolina Jan. 11, 
1862, took part at the battle of Roanoke Island February 8. It was engaged with loss at New Berne March 14, and, 
encamping in the vicinity, it shared from time to time in outpost duty at Batchelder'B Creek. In July a reconnois- 
sance was made toward Trenton, N. C. It remained with headquarters at New Berne during the summer, and in 
the autumn served in detachments on outpost duty at Washington, N. C, Newport Barracks and Batchelder'B 
Creek. Forming part of the 3d Brigade, with Colonel Lee as brigade commander, the regiment, under Lieutenant- 
Colonel Lyman, took part in the Tarboro' expedition in November, and later in the Goldsboro' expedition. In 
January, 1863, it was posted at Washington, N. C., and was active there in the engagements in March and on duty 
in the town during the siege, returning to New Berne April 25. Companies G and H, stationed at Plymouth during 
that time, were engaged at Rocky Hoc Creek near Winfleld in March. The regiment, reunited and stationed with 
headquarters at New Berne until October, moved on the 16th of that month to Newport News, and, becoming part 
of General Butler's forces, served during the winter as provost guard at Portsmouth and Norfolk. At this time 343 
members of the regiment re-enlisted ; 220 returned January 15 from a month's furlough in Massachusetts. The com- 
mand moved, April 27, 1864, to Yorktown, and reaching Bermuda Hundred May 5, formed part of Heckman's Red Star 
Brigade, 18th Army Corps, and was engaged near Port Walthall May 6 and 7, at Swift Creek May 9 and at Drewry's 
Bluff May 14 to 16; many were taken prisoners, including Colonel Lee. Under command of Maj. William A. 
Walker it joined the Army of the Potomac at Cold Harbor June 1, and took part in the movements and engagements 
of the following days, losing heavily in the assault of June 3, when Major Walker was killed. It was actively en- 
gaged under Major Moore before Petersburg June 15 and 18, and took part in the siege until withdrawn from the 
front August 25. On September 17 it moved to Portsmouth, and those whose term of service had expired left 
Fortress Monroe on the 23d, and were mustered out at Springfield, Mass., Sept. 29, 1864. The regiment returned to 
Beaufort, N. C, September 21 , and was stationed in the vicinity until the spring of 1865, engaging in service at Plym- 
outh from December 7 to January 8. In March the regiment moved towards Kinston, and was engaged at South 
West Creek March 8. It remained afterward on duty at New Berne until its muster out, June 26, 1865. Reaching 
Massachusetts July 7, it was paid off and discharged at Readville July 19, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



247 



Twenty-seventh Regiment Massachusetts 


In 


fan 


try. 






• 






Us 

$ 

m 

•a 

s 

IS 


a 
3 


Companies. 


■a 3 

p 2 

bo o 

■s« 

ro 
P 
U 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


i 


K 


3 

o 
H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 


• 


1 


7 


5 


7 


10 


18 


10 


25 


6 
10 


7 


3 


10 




8 

101 




1 


3 
10 


20 


16 


24 


20 


13 


11 


10 


12 

23 

38 


13 

7 
30 




109 


Died by accident or disease, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


3 

149 


Totals, .... 


20 
45 


15 

38 


19 
53 


3 
41 


4 
27 


4 
40 


8 
24 


17 
34 


- 


152 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


120 


Total losses, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . . 


11 

370 






























381 





Casualties by Engagements. 
















1862. 

Feb. 8, Roanoke Island, N. C, 
March 14, New Berne, N. C, 

1863. 

March 24, Rocky Hoc Creek, 

N. C. 
May 22-23, Gum Swamp, N. C, . 
Place unknown, . 

1864. 

May 6-7, Port Walthall, Va., . 
May 9, Arrowfield Church, Va., 
May 14-16, Drewry's Bluff, Va. 

(Fort Darling). 
May 23, Bakehouse Creek,Va., 
June 1-12, Cold Harbor, Va. 

(Bethesda Church). 
June 15-18, Petersburg, Va., 
June 29- July 24, Before Petersburg, 

Va 
Aug. 19, Before Petersburg, Va., 

Place unknown, . 

1865. 

March 8, Kins ton, N. C, or 
South West Creek. 


- 1 


1 

1 
1 

4 


1 

2 
1 

1 


1 
1 

4 
1 


1 

1 

1 

' 1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

2 


1 

1 
2 

7 

4 
1 

2 


1 

1 

1 

4 

2 

1 


2 
3 

1 

5 

1 
5 

5 
1 

1 


1 
1 

1 

2 

1 


1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 


1 
1 

1 


1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

3 
1 

1 


- 


4 

12 

1 

2 

2 

1 

5 

9 

12 

1 
31 

14 
4 

1 
1 
3 

6 



Present also at Washington, N. C. 



248 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Twenty-eighth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. "William Monteith. (2) Col. Richard Byrnes. 





*3 
03 

CO 

•a 
c 
a 

2 
"a 

E 


a 

S3 

3 


•a 


Companies. 


to 

03 

C 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


BO 

"3 
-^» 

o 
H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 


18 
23 


80 


24 


226 


239 


215 


208 


209 


130 


117 


99 


126 


124 


65 


98 

1,805 




10 


- 


2 

2 


6 
3 


5 
2 


3 

2 


6 
2 


1 


3 


2 


4 
1 


3 
1 


- 


1,903 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


42 
16 


Totals, .... 


10 

18 
13 


80 


24 


4 
222 


9 
230 


7 
208 


5 
203 


8 
201 


1 
129 


3 

114 


2 

97 


5 
121 


4 
120 


65 


58 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, 1 . 


98 
1,747 


Totals, .... 


























1,845 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 28th Mass. Infantry, organized at Cambridge, Mass., during the autumn of 1861, was composed principally, 
like the 9th Mass. Infantry, of men of Irish birth or descent. It was mustered into service Dec. 13,;l861, and left the 
State Jan. 11, 1862, under command of Col. William Monteith. It remained at Fort Columbus, New York harbor, 
for a month, and, embarking then for South Carolina, reached Hilton Head Feb 23, 1862. Becoming part of General 
T. W. Sherman's Expeditionary Corps, it moved in April to a position on Daufuskie Island opposite Fort Pulaski, 
serving by detachments at Jones and Bird Island and at Tybee Island, Ga. Colonel Monteith being detained at the 
latter place in May and resigning in August, the command of the regiment was held by Major Cartwright. It was 
sent to James Island May 30, becoming part of the 1st Brigade, Stevens' Division, and engaged with loss in the action 
at Fort Johnson, Secessionville, June 16. Returning to Hilton Head, the regiment formed part of the force sent to 
reinforce the Army of the Potomac, and reached Newport News July 18. Forming part of the 9th Corps, it moved 
to join the Army of Virginia, and took active part at Manassas August 29 and 30 and at Chantilly September 1. 
Moving with the army into Maryland, it was present at South Mountain, and engaged op the afternoon of September 
17 at Antietam. In November the regiment became part of Meagher's Irish Brigade, 1st Division, 2d Army Corps, 
and met heavy loss at Fredericksburg in the assault on the heights December 13. It was engaged at Chancellors- 
ville on the morning of May 3 and lost heavily at Gettysburg. It took part in the movements about the Rappahan- 
nock and joined in the Mine Run campaign, making its winter quarters at Stevensburg, Va. As part of Colonel 
Smyth's Brigade, General Barlow's Division, the regiment shared in the engagement at the Wilderness and in the 
movement to Spotsylvania, taking part in the charge and capture of the salient early in the morning of May 12 at 
Spotsylvania Court House, and engaging again in the assault on May 18. It took active part at Cold Harbor June 3, 
when Colonel Byrnes was mortally wounded. Sharing in the assault of Petersburg June 16, it took most active part 
afterward in the siege, engaging at Weldon Railroad in July and at Deep Bottom, Charles City Cross Roads and 
Reams' Station in August. Dec. 13, 1864, those of the regiment not re-enlisted left for Massachusetts, and the 
remainder, as a battalion of five companies under Major Fleming, remained in service before Petersburg, took part 
in the final operations about the city in the spring of 1865 and joined in the pursuit of the Confederates to Farmville. 
Encamping after the surrender at Burkesville, it returned to Alexandria May 15, and was mustered out of service 
June 30, 1865, returning to Massachusetts on July 5. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



249 



Twenty-eighth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 





OS 
BQ 

•a 

CS 

■a 

5 


a 
3 


Companies. 


as 

C 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


00 

1 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men 


2 


13 


27 

6 

10 


22 


41 


22 


16 


18 


19 


18 


15 

4 

10 


18 
5 




15 
216 




2 




3 
11 


3 
12 


7 
7 


3 
6 


3 
6 


1 
10 


4 
5 


4 


231 




34 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men,' .... 


1 

88 


Totals, 


2 
2 


14 


11 
54 


6 
42 


2 
58 


7 
43 


3 
28 


8 
35 


4 
34 


3 
30 


3 
32 


2 
25 


1 

5 


89 


Died as prisoners, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


50 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


16 

388 


Totals, 


























404 



Including non-commissioned staff. 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1862. 

June 16, Secessionville, S. C, 
Aug. 30, Manassas, Va., . 
Sept. 1, Chantilly, Va., . 
Sept. 17, Antietam, Md., . 
Dec. 12-13, Fredericksburg, Va., 
Place unknown, . 

1863. 

July 2-3, Gettysburg, Pa., . 
Oct. 14, Auburn, Va , 
Dec. 3, Kelly's Ford, Va., 

Place unknown, . 



May 5-7, 
May 10, 
May 12-18, 
May 30-31, 
June 3-6, 
June 16-17, 
July 27, 
Aug. 14, 
Aug. 25, 
Oct. 10, 



1864. 

Wilderness, Va., . 
Po River, Va., 
Spotsylvania," Va., 
Pamunkey River, Va. 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., . 
Deep Bottom, Va., 
Deep Bottom, Va., 
Reams' Station, Va , 
Before Petersburg, Va 
Place unknown, . 



1865. 

March 25, Before Petersburg 

(Hatcher's Run),Va. 

March 28, Before Petersburg, Va., 









1 


5 


1 


3 




2 


2 


2 


3 




_ 


1 


3 


1 


9 


1 


3 


5 


2 


1 


2 


3 


_ 


_ 


1 


5 


4 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


3 


1 


2 


_ 


_ 


1 


3 


2 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


3 


3 


1 


- 


- 


3 


6 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


2 


4 


3 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


3 


1 


- 


- 


1 


— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


,1 


2 


2 


2 


1 


2 
1 


2 


1 


-' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


6 


4 

2 


3 


- 


1 


2 


- 


2 


1 


- 


1 


2 


2 


1 


3 
1 
1 


3 




2 


2 
1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


.1 


1 


2 


_ 


1 




2 


_ 


3 





_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 










1 


1 


- 


_ 


1 


^ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


2 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


1 
1 
























1 


1 




1 


1 


5 


1 


1 


— 


- 


- 


6 


2 


4 


3 
















- 


1 

























19 
31 
22 
21 
39 
7 



13 
1 
1 
2 



22 
2 

19 
2 

12 
4 
2 
4 
4 
1 

12 



16 

1 



Present also at South Mountain, Chancellorsville, Bristoe's Station, Mine Run, North Anna, Totopotomoy, 
South Side Railroad, Sutherland Station, Sailors' Creek and Appomattox. 



250 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Twenty-ninth Hegiment Massachusetts Infantry. 
Col. Ebenezer W. Peirce. 





SO 
5 

S 
'55 

K 


03 

3 


Companies. 


BO 

is 

00 

eS 
C 
P 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I K 


00 

O 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


17 
12 


86 


143 


170 


164 


105 


131 


150 


143 


156 


129 


144 


2 


103 
1,449 




9 


- 


5 
3 


3 
1 


2 


2 
2 


4 


6 

2 


5 


4 
1 


1 


5 
3 


- 




Enlisted men (included above) com- 
missioned in regiment.' 

Enlisted men (included above) serv- 
ing elsewhere within regiment. 


46 

12 


Totals, 


9 

17 
3 


86 


8 
135 


4 
166 


2 
162 


4 
101 


4 
127 


8 
142 


5 
138 


5 
151 


1 

128 


8 
136 


2 


58 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


103 
1,391 


Totals, 




























1,494 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



Seven companies of infantry, recruited for three years in April, 1861, formed the basis of the 29th Mass. Infantry. 
Two of these companies were sent to Fortress Monroe May 10, and the others followed on the 18th and 22d. They 
were assigned to the 3d and 4th Infantries, M. V. M., and served in the vicinity of the Fortress with these regiments 
during their three months' term. On July 16 the seven companies were organized as the 1st Battalion Mass. Volun- 
teers, under Capt. Joseph H. Barnes. Still serving on garrison and guard duty at Fortress Monroe and later at 
Newport News, three additional companies joining the command, it was reorganized Dec. 13, 1861, as the 29th Mass. 
Infantry, and Ebenezer W. Peirce, previously brigadier-general of Massachusetts militia, received the appointment 
of colonel. The regiment formed part of the land battery during the contest between the naval forces at Hampton 
Roads in March, 1862, and occupied posts at Norfolk and Portsmouth in May. It joined the Army of the Potomac 
at Fair Oaks June 9, and was assigned to General Meagher's Brigade, Richardson's Division, Sumner's Corps; It 
was engaged on picket June 15, and took part at Gaines's Mill, Savage's Station and Glendale. Moving from Harri- 
son's Landing to A lexaudria, it supported General Pope in his movement to Washington after the battle of Manassas. 
At Antietam, as part of Richardson's Division, it was engaged in the charge in support of Hooker's forces in the 
forenoon, and served during the day in the position then gained. In November the regiment was transferred to the 
1st Brigade, 1st Division, 9th Corps, and was present at the battle of Fredericksburg. In March, 1863, it moved with 
the corps to Kentucky, and made its headquarters at Paris, encamping in May at Somerset. It joined General 
Grant's forces at Vicksburg June 17, and shared in the pursuit of General Johnston to Jackson, Miss. Returning to 
Kentucky, it reached Covington Aug. 24, 1863, and a few days later began the march into Tennessee. Entering 
Knoxville September 26, it took active part in the defence of Fort Sanders November 29, and formed part of the 
garrison during the siege. In the winter of 1864 a large part of the regiment re-enlisted, and left Cincinnati April 7 
for furlough in Massachusetts, while those not re-enlisted, having been transferred to the 36th Mass. Infantry Janu- 
ary 30, moved with that regiment to Virginia in March and served with loss at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania, 
leaving the front and arriving in Boston May 23 for muster out. Organized as the 29th Veteran Infantry, the com- 
mand joined the Army of the Potomac May 29 at North Anna. It was engaged at Cold Harbor and at the assault 
at Petersburg June 17, serving afterward in the siege. It was engaged at Fort Stedman March 25, 1865, and encamped 
near Petersburg after the surrender. Reaching Alexandria April 28, it was stationed as provost guard at George- 
town, and transferred June 9 to Tenallytown, Md., where it completed its service, being mustered out July 29, 
1865. It was paid off and discharged at Readville, Mass., Aug. 11, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



251 



Twenty-ninth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 










CO 
W 

§ 
03 

2 


s 

3 


COMPANlfeS. 


00 

i! 

fcl' QJ 

1« 

03 

C 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


CO 

« 

O 

H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men 


1 


3 


8 

4 


8 


5 


1 


8 


5 


6 


7 


4 

7 


5 

8 

2 

15 




4 
57 




1 


4 


1 

5 


11 


11 


14 


1 
14 


1 

7 


14 


- 


61 




3 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


5 
95 




2 


7 


1 
13 


1 
15 


3 
19 


12 


2 
24 


1 
21 


2 
16 


2 
23 


11 


- 


100 

i 


Died as prisoners, — 
Officers, . . . 
Enlisted men, .... 


14 


Total losses, — \ 
Enlisted men, .... 


9 
169 


Totals, 


















178 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1861. 

June 10, Big Bethel, Va., 

1S62. 

June 15, Fair Oaks, Va., 
June 27, Gaines's Mill, Va., . 
June 30, Glendale, or White Oak 

Swamp, Va. 
July 1, Malvern Hill, Va., . 
Sept. 17, Antietam, Md., 

1863. 

July 16, Jackson, Miss , 

Nov. 16, Campbell Station, Tenn., 

Nov. 29, Knoxville, Tenn , . 

1864. 

May 12, Spotsylvania, Va., . 
June 1, Bethesda Church, Va , . 
June 17, Petersburg,Va. (Assault) , 
July 30, Petersburg, Va. (Crater), 
Aug. 19, Weldon Railroad, Va., . 
Aug. and Sept., Before Petersburg, 
Va. 

1865. 

Mar. 25, Fort Stedman, Va., . 
Place unknown, 



1 


1 

1 
1 


1 

3 
1 

1 

1 


2 

2 

3 
1 

1 


1 

1 
1 

1 


1 


1 

2 
1 

3 
1 


2 

1 
1 

2 


1 

1 

1 

4 


2 

1 

1 

2 
1 


1 

1 
1 

1 


1 

1 

2 
1 


- 



1 

1 

4 

1 
12 



8 
2 
9 

4 

1 

2 



12 
1 



Present also at Hampton Roads, Savage's Station, Bull Run, 2d, Fredericksburg, Vicksburg, Blue 

Springs and Cold Harbor. 



252 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Thirtieth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

Col. Nathan A. M. Dudley, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





a 

en 

■O 

§ 

2 


a 

3 


Companies. 


■« 

IS 

s 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


03 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


16 
22 

15 


66 


132 

2 
2 


129 


135 


133 


140 


136 


137 


160 


149 


163 

1 


4 


82 
1,440 




1 


2 
4 


2 
6 


2 
4 


1 
1 


1 


3 


3 


1,522 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


33 

17 


Totals, 


15 

16 

7 


66 


4 

128 


1 

128 


6 

129 


8 
125 


6 
134 


2 
134 


1 

136 


3 
157 


3 
146 


1 
162 


4 


50 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


82 
1,390 


Totals, 
























1,472 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 30th Mass. Infantry, as the Eastern Bay State Regiment, was raised by General Buller at Camp Chase, 
Lowell, Mass., in the autumn of 1861, and left camp Jan. 2, 1862, under Acting Lieut.-Col. Jonas H. French. It re- 
mained at Fortress Monroe until February 2, and being assigned to the Department of the Gulf, it reached Ship 
Island, Miss., February 12. Company K joined the regiment March 9, and the organization was completed during 
'the month as the 30th Mass. Infantry, Capt. Nathan A.M.Dudley, of the 10th U.S. Infantry, having been appointed 
colonel March 1. As part of General Phelps's force it shared in the operations against New Orleans in April, a de- 
tachment under Major Whittemore occupying Fort St. Philip immediately after its surrender. Stationed at Baton 
Rouge, it engaged aB part of General Williams's Brigade in the movement against Vicksburg, and, returning, took 
active part at the battle of Baton Rouge August 5, under command of Major Whittemore. Leaving Baton Rouge 
August 21, it encamped in the vicinity of Carrollton until November 3, moving then to New Orleans. Iu January, 
1863, the regiment was assigned to the 3d Brigade (commanded by Colonel Dudley), 1st Division, 19th Army Corps. 
It formed part of the land forces operating with Farragut against Port Hudson March 14, and shared in the Port 
Hudson campaign, engaging at Plains Store May 21, and taking active part during the siege, twice providing volun- 
teers to storm the works. Moving to Donaldsonville after the surrender, it met with loss In the action of July 13; it 
formed part of the expedition to Sabine Pass, Tex , in September, and encamped for the winter at New Iberia. 
While in winter quarters three-fourths of the regiment re-enlisted and left New Orleans March 6 for furlough, 
returning May 16. In July the regiment was sent as part of General Emory's force to the defence of Washington, 
and, arriving at the capital July 13, marched immediately to the Shenandoah in pursuit of General Early. Return- 
ing to Georgetown on the 23d, it moved again into Maryland, and formed part of General Sheridan's forces in 
movements in the Shenandoah valley, engaging, under command of Capt. S. D. Shipley, in the battles of Opequon, 
Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek. It encamped for the winter at Opequon Crossing, and April 22 returned to Wash- 
ington. It was ordered to Savannah, Ga., June 1, was stationed at Georgetown, S. C, and afterward at Sumter, 
and remained more than a year on provost duty, being mustered out at Charleston, S. C, July 5, 1866, the last vol- 
unteer organization in Massachusetts to be mustered out of the United States service. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



253 



Thirtieth Regiment Massachusetts 


Infantry. 












M 

e 
<n 

2 
"a! 


a 
3 


Companies. 


p 

03 

c 
to 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


p 


G 


H 


I 


K 


OB 

a 

o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 


3 


3 


6 


6 


5 


5 


4 


1 


5 


5 


6 




4 
46 


Totals, 


- 


2 


33 


22 


28 


25 


34 


34 


40 


16 
32 


33 


20 
36 


- 


50 


Missing, 


36 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


2 
317 


Totals, 


1 


5 


36 


28 


35 


30 


39 


38 


42 


53 


38 


62 




319 


Died as prisoners, — 


2 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


6 
401 


Totals, 










"1 " 
















407 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1862. 

June 6, Picket, near Baton Rouge, 

La. 
Aug. 5, Baton Rouge, La., . 



1863. 

May 21, Plains Store, La., . 
May 29, Port Hudson, La., . 
July 13, Donaldsonville, La., 



1864. 

Sept. 19, Opequon, or Winchester, 

Va. 
Sept. 22, Fisher's Hill, Va., . • . 
Oct. 19, Cedar Creek, Va , . 









1 




















1 


1 


1 




2 


1 






1 


1 


1 






- 


— 


— 


"■ 


1 


3 


1 


1 


"" 


3 


1 


mm 


*~ 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


1 


1 


2 


5 


2 


- 


1 
3 


3 


- 


17 


1 
2 


1 
22 


- 



1 
1 

10 



3 

58 



Present also at Vicksburg. 



254 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Thirty-first Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 
Col. Oliver P. Gooding, Bvt. Maj. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





OS 
GQ 

"5 

3 
2 

E 




Companies. 


w 

a 

c 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F G 


H 


I 


K 


CO 

O 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


15 
14 


38 


146 


137 


137 


135 

2 
5 


137 


126 


107 


123 


129 


146 


6 


53 
1,343 




4 


- 


1 
2 


2 
1 


2 
1 


2 


1 


1 


1 

1 


2 
1 


1 
1 


1,396 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


19 
12 


Totals, 


4 

15 
10 


38 


3 

143 


3 
134 


3 

134 


7 
128 


2 
135 


1 

125 


1 
106 


2 
121 


3 

126 


2 
144 


6 


31 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


53 
1,312 






























1,365 



Including non-commissioned staff. 



Tbe 31st Mass. Infantry, under the name of the Western Bay State Regiment, was raised in the autumn and 
winter of 1861-G2 by General Butler, was in camp at Pittsfleld, Mass., and moved in February to Camp Chase, 
Lowell. It left the State February 21 to join the Department of the Gulf, under command of Col. Oliver P. Gooding, 
a graduate of West Point, and first lieutenant 10th U. S. Infantry. General Butler and his Btaff embarked at Fortress 
Monroe on tbe " Mississippi," which carried the regiment to Ship Island, where they landed March 23, having been 
delayed by storms and accident on the passage. Soon after the arrival of the regiment its designation was changed 
to the 31st Mass. Infantry. Assigned to General Williams's Brigade.it took part in the operations against New 
Orleans, was the first regiment to enter tbe city after the surrender, and was stationed on provost and guard duty in 
the city and at the forts in the vicinity during the summer and autumn. On the organization of the 19th Army 
Corps, in January, 1863, seven companies of the regiment, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Hopkins, became 
part of the 3d Brigade, 3d Division, with Colonel Gooding as brigade commander, the three remaining companies 
having been stationed at Fort Pike. The main body of 'the regiment joining the forces at Baton Rouge March 6, took 
part on the 14th in the advance made to assist the naval forces in passing Port Hudson. It joined in the Teche ex- 
pedition, being engaged at Fort Bisland April 13, and took up its position before Port Hudson May 23, sharing in the 
engagements of May 25, 27 and June 14, and was active during the siege. After the surrender on July 9 it moved as 
part of WeitzeFs forces to Donaldsonville. In December, joined by the companies at Fort Pike, it was armed and 
equipped as cavalry and stationed at Carrollton, being familiarly known as the 6th Mass. Cavalry. 

It took part in the Red River campaign, and was engaged with loss at Sabine Cross Roads, April 8, 1864, under 
command of Captain Nettleton. Many of the regiment had re-enlisted during the winter, and embarked July 21 
for their furlough in Massachusetts, returning September 19, those not re-enlisted having remained during their 
absence on guard duty at New Orleans, under Captain Morse. The regiment, still serving as cavalry, was stationed 
at Donaldsonville in November, two companies being detached at Plaquemine. In February the legiment was 
organized as a battalion of five companies, those whose term of service had expired having been mustered out, and, 
joined by the detachment at Plaquemine, took part with Lieutenant-Colonel Nettleton iu the operations against 
Mobile, Ala., and occupied the city after the surrender uutil the close of its service. It was mustered out Sept. 9, 
1865, and received its final discharge and payment at Gallop's Island, Boston harbor, Sept. 30, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



255 



Thirty-first 


Regiment 


Massachusetts Infantry. 












it- 
si 
w 
"3 

C 

a 

s 

K 


C 

13 


Companies. 


C g 

fal v 

03 

C 

fcs 


' 




A 


B 


C 


D 


£3 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


CO 

3 

o 
t- 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 . 

Missing, 

Died by accident or disease, — 
Enlisted men, . 


• 


1 
1 


2 


5 
1 

16 


9 
18 


6 
1 

16 


8 
22 


11 
11 

22 


2 
11 


2 
1 

7 


5 
13 


- 


5 
13 

18 





54 
3 

3 
127 


Totals, .... 


1 
1 


2 


1 
23 


27 


23 


30 


13 


1 

11 


18 


- 


130 


Died as prisoners, — 
Enlisted men, . 


2 


Total losses, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men,' . 


3 

186 


Totals, .... 
























189 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1868. 

Dec. 10, Dessair Station, La., 



1863. 

April 13, Bisland, La., . 

May 25-June 14, Port Hudson, La., 

June 26, Brashear City, La., . 



1864. 

April 8, Sabine Cross Roads, La., 1 
April 23, Cane River, La., 
May 1, Hudnot's Plantation, La., 
May 3, Moore's Plantation, near 

Alexandria, La. 
May 14, Near Alexandria, La., . 
May 18, Yellow Bayou, La., 
Nov. 21, Plaquemine, La., . 



1865. 

Feb. 4, Near Plaquemine, La., 



1 




2 

2 
1 

1 


1 
3 

1 

1 

1 
2 


2 

1 
3 


2 
2 

4 


6 

2 

1 
2 


1 

1 


1 
2 


1 

2 
1 
1 


- 


2 
2 
1 


- 



1 

18 
1 



11 
1 
1 

2 

2 

15 

1 



Present also at siege of Mobile. 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



256 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Thirty-second. Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Francis J. Parker. 

(2) Col. George L. Prescott, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(3) Col. J. Cxjshing Bdmands, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





to 

"S 
3 
2 


c 


Companies. 


CO 

is 

S5e5 

a 







A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L. 


M 


to 

o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 


14 
13 

2 


80 


222 


222 


212 


208 


202| 199 


210 


205 


198 


197 


127 

1 
1 


117 

1 


19 


94 
2,351 




6 

1 


5 
1 


4 
4 


3 


4 


5 


4 


2 


4 


3 
1 


- 


2,445 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within 
regiment. 


44 
8 


Totals, .... 


2 

14 
11 


80 


7 
215 


6 
216 


8 
204 


3 

205 


4 
198 


5 
194 


4 
206 


2 

203 


4 
194 


4 
193 


2 
125 


1 
116 


19 


52 


Actual total of members of 
regiment, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, 1 . 


94 
2,299 






























2,393 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 32d Mass. Infantry was formed in May, 1862, from the 1st Battalion Mass. Infantry, which was organized in 
November, 1861, to garrison Fort Warren, Boston harbor, and remained stationed there, under command of Maj. 
Francis J. Parker, during the winter of 1861-62. On May 26, this battalion of six companies, reorganized as the 32d 
Mass. Infantry (Francis J. Parker, lieutenant-colonel), left the State for Washington. Encamping for four weeks 
on Capitol Hill, the regiment was ordered to join the Army of the Potomac on the Peninsula, and July 3, 1862, 
arrived at Harrison's Lauding and was assigned to the 2d Brigade, 1st Division, 5th Corps. It left camp August 15 
to join General Pope's forces, and reached Warrenton Junction August 27. Moving with the army to Washington 
after the battle of Manassas, it camped at Miners Hill, and three companies were added to the command, one 
having already joined the original six companies at Harrison's Landing in July. The regiment was present at 
Antietam, and took part in the charge and advanced position held by Griffin's Division at the battle of Fredericks- 
burg. It was in action at Chancellorsville May 3, 1864, was closely engaged at Gettysburg on the afternoon of July 
2, present at the battle of Rappahannock Station Nov. 7, 1863, and engaged in the Mine Run campaign, encamping 
at Liberty, near Bealton, Va., for the winter. While here 330 •en re-enlisted, and in January, 1864, returned to 
Massachusetts for furlough. The regiment left camp April 30, 1864, and was in action on the afternoon of May 5 at 
the Wilderness, engaging constantly on the succeeding days; it lost heavily at the battle of Laurel Hill May 12, and 
was active during the movements about Spotsylvania, North Anna and Totopotomoy, engaging, June 3, at Bethesda 
Church. Crossing the James River June 16, it took part in the assault at Petersburg, June 18-22, where Col. George 
L. Prescott was mortally wounded. Engaging afterward in the siege, it took part at the Weldon Railroad August 
18-21 and at Poplar Spring Church September 30. It was active in the final operations about Petersburg, took part in 
the pursuit of Lee's Army to Appomattox, and as part of the 3d Brigade, 1st Division, 5lh Corps, received the arms of 
General Lee's forces at the formal surrender, April 11, 1865. Encamping near Appomattox until May 1, it reached 
Washington May 12 and remained until the termination of its service. Before its muster out, June 28, 1865, the re- 
enlisted men and recruits of the 9th, 12th, 13th, 18th, 22d and 39th Mass. Infantries had been added to its numbers. 
Reaching Boston July 1, it received its final discharge and payment at Gallop's Island July 11, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



257 



Thirty-second Begiment Massachusetts Infantry. 










«3 

cj 

VI 

a 

•A 

2 

E 


c 

13 


Companies. 


•£» 

•I 

r- *1 

<a 
c 

fcJ 




- 


A 


b|c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


L 


M 


3 

o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 


1 
1 

1 

1 

2 


4 
2 

6 


13 


11 


13 


7 


16 


11 


17 


10 


15 


12 


1 


1 


1 


5 
129 


Totals, .... 


15 


1 

7 


3 


1 
15 


3 

12 


9 

3 
23 


3 
9 


12 


18 


1 
10 


1 


3 


1 


134 


Missing, 


9 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, 1 


2 
115 




2 
30 


1 
20 


3 
19 


1 
24 


2 
33 


2 
31 


3 

25 


33 


3 
26 


2 


4 


117 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, . 


20 


Total losses, — 

Officers, .... 
Enlisted men, 1 


7 
273 


Totals, .... 






























280 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1868. 

Dec. 13, Fredericksburg, 
Va. 

18G3. 

May 2, Chancellorsville, 

Va. 
July 2-3, Gettysburg, Pa., 1 . 

1864. 

May 5, Wilderness, Va.,. 
May 10-12, Spotsylvania 

(Laurel Hill) ,Va 
May 30, Shady Grove 

Church, Va. 
May 30-31, Totopotomoy,Va., 
June 3, Bethesda Ch ,Va., 
June 18-22, Petersburg, Va., 
Aug. 21, WeldonR.R.,Va., 
Sept. 30, Poplar Spring 

Church, Va. 
Oct. 15, Before Petersburg, 

Va. 
Place unknown, . 



Feb. 5-6. 
March 30, 



18G5. 

H atcher ' s Bun , V a . 
Boydtown Plank 

Road, Va. 
Place unknown, . 



- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 
1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


3 


2 


- 


- 


2 


3 


4" 


1 


1 


4 


- 


- 


- 








1 


1 


1 


1 




2 








1 








1 


4 


3 


6 
1 


3 

1 


2 


5 


10 


2 


7 
1 


4 






"" 


- 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 
5 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 
1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


1 


4 


- 


2 


2 


3 
2 


2 


- 


- 


- 






1 






1 
















- 


- 


- 


2 


1 
2 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 
1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 



1 

22 



7 
47 



3 

13 

17 

3 

2 



4 
3 

3 



Present also at Malvern Hill, Gainesville, Manassas, Chantilly, Antietam, Rappahannock Station, Mine 
Run, North Anna, Jerusalem Road, Gravelly Run, Vaughan Road, Five Forks and Appomattox. 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



258 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Thirty-third Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Albert C. Maggi. (2) Col. Adin B. Underwood, Bvt. Maj. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





T3 

S 


g 
3 


Companies. 


5 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


93 

o 
H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


17 
19 


64 


117 


103 


110 


115 


114 


113 


111 


110 


105 


122 


5 


81 

1,144 


Totals, 


12 
1 


- 


2 
2 


4 


2 

1 


3 

2 


1 
2 


1 
2 


1 


3 
3 


4 
1 


2 
3 


- 


1,225 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment i 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 1 


35 

17 


Totals, ..... 


13 

17 
6 


64 


4 
113 


4 
99 


3 
107 


5 
110 


3 
111 


3 
110 


1 
110 


6 
104 


5 
100 


5 

117 


5 


52 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


81 
1,092 


























1,173 



1 Including non-commiBsioned staff. 



The 33d Regiment Mass. Infantry, composed mainly of men from Middlesex and Bristol counties, was organized 
at Camp Edwin M.Stanton, Lynnfield, Mass., in June and July, 1862; and twelve companies iustead of the usual ten 
were mustered into service early in August, under command of Col. Albert C. Maggi, late lieutenant-colonel of the 
21st Mass. Infantry. It left the State for Washington August 14, and was located for a time at Alexandria. It 
moved October 10 to Fairfax Station, becoming part of the 2d Brigade, 2d Division, 11th Corps, advanced to 
Thoroughfare Gap in November, and took part in a reconnoissance to White Plains. Its two extra companies were 
transferred to the 41st Mass. Infantry in this month. It moved in December to Falmouth, a'nd took up winter 
quarters, engaging in the mud march of January, 1863. As part of General Barlow's Brigade at Chancellorsvillei 
the regiment, with the exception of two companies left on picket with the 11th Corps, was sent in support of General 
Sickles in his movement on the afternoon of May 2. It acted in support of General Pleasanton in the battle of 
Beverly Ford June 9. At Gettysburg, as part of Steinwehr's Division, it held Cemetery Ridge during the three 
days of the battle. Returning to Virginia and posted for a time at Catlett's and Bristoe's stations, it was ordered 
in September with the 11th Corps under Hooker to join the Army of the Cumberland in Tennessee, and arrived at 
Bridgeport, Tenn., October 1. It took part at the battle of Wauhatchie or Lookout Valley, forming with the 73d 
Ohio the force to assault the heights, meeting most severe loss, though finally successful. Colonel Underwood being 
severely wounded, the command of the regiment was taken by Lieutenant-Colonel Ryder. It engaged at Chat- 
tanooga, and marching to the relief of Knoxville, received at Louisville, Tenn., the news of the raising of the siege, 
and returning, made winter quarters at Lookout Valley. In the spring of 1864, forming part of the 20th Coips, 
Army of the Cumberland, the regiment was engaged at Resaca, Ga., making a series of charges, and was detailed as 
division train guard during the siege of Atlanta, and afterwards served as provost guard in the city under Maj. 
Elisha Doane. It shared in Sherman's march to the sea, aud entered Savannah December 21, where it remained 
until the close of the year. Encamping in South Carolina in January, 1865, it began the march northward January 
29, and took part at Averysboro', N. C, March 16, and at Bentonville on the 19th. It went into camp near Golds- 
boro', N. C, March 24, and moved on April 10 toward Baleigh, receiving at Smithville the iiews of Lee's surrender. 
Encamping near Raleigh until April 30, it moved then to the vicinity of Richmond and on toward Washington, 
reaching Alexandria May 19. It was mustered out of service to date June 11, 1865, and reaching Massachusetts June 
3, was paid off and discharged at Readville July 2, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



259 



Thirty-third. Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 





a 

w 

■a 
a 

a 
■c 


c 
3 


Companies. 


03 

.Is 

to 02 
« ~ 

C 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


00 

3 
5 

H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Enlisted men, .... 






8 


5 


9 


8 


14 


10 


6 


9 


13 


13 




7 
95 


Totals, 


- 


7 


8 
16 


6 
11 


2 

1 

12 


11 
19 


11 

1 

26 


7 
1 

18 


4 

4 

14 


10 
1 

20 


3 

1 

17 


3 

16 


- 


102 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


65 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 


9 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


7 
169 


Totals, 
























176 





Casualties by Engagements. 
















1863. 

July 1-3, Gettysburg, Pa., . 
Aug. 15, Guerilla Fire, 
Oct. 29, AVauhatchie, or Look- 
out Valley, Tenn. 

1864. 

May 13-16, Resaca, Ga , . 

May 25-June 4, Dallas, or New 

Hope Church, Ga. 
June 9-30, Kenesaw Mountain, 

Ga. 
July 25, Atlanta, Ga., 

1865. 

March 16, Averysboro', N. C-, 
March 21, Bentonville, N. C, 


- 


1 

4 

2 


1 
3 

2 

1 

1 


3 
2 


3 

1 
5 


3 

2 

2 
1 


1 
8 

1 

2 

2 


7 

2 
1 


3 

1 

2 


2 
2 

3 
1 

1 


2 
4 

3 
2 

2 


1 
6 

3 
2 

1 


- 


9 

1 

36 

24 
18 

11 

1 

1 
1 



260 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Thirty-fourth Kegiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. George D. Wells, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(2) Col. William S. Lincoln, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





it- 

ci 
en 

"2 


0) 

3 


Companies. 


ss 

c 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


o3 

« 
o 

H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


14 
11 


62 


118 


121 


114 


135 


123 


139 


128 


129 


122 


125 


4 


76 
1,269 




4 


- 


2 


3 

1 


2 
1 


1 


4 
1 


4 


3 


6 


2 


1 
1 


1,345 


Enlisted men (included above) com- 
missioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) serv- 
ing elsewhere within regiment. 


32 
4 


Totals, 


4 

14 

7 


62 


2 
116 


4 

117 


3 
111 


1 
134 


5 
118 


4 
135 


3 
125 


6 
123 


2 

120 


2 
123 


4 


36 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


76 
1,233 






























1,309 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 34th Mass. Infantry was recruited in camp at Worcester, Mass., from June to August, 1862, and left the State 
for Washington August 15 under command of Col. George D. Wells, promoted from lieutenant-colonel 1st Mass. 
Infantry. It moved August 22 to Alexandria, and remained stationed in the vicinity, on picket and outpost duty in 
the defences of Washington, until July, 1863. It left Washington for Harper's Ferry July 9, and occupied Maryland 
Heights, becoming part of the 1st Brigade, under Colonel Wells, 1st Division Department of Western Virginia. It 
met the enemy at Berryville October 18, and took part in December in an expedition up the Shenandoah valley, 
marching as far as Harrisonburg. The regiment remained on provost and outpost duty at Harper's Ferry and 
Martinsburg until May 2, 1864, when, as part of General Sigel's force, it went to Winchester and took part in the 
movements in the Shenandoah, engaging with loss at the battle of New Market May 15, at Piedmont June 5, and at 
Lynchburg June 18, GeDeral Hunter having succeeded General Sigel in command of the department. .Returning 
from the campaign to Lynchburg, the regiment reached Martinsburg July 11, 1864, met the enemy at Snicker's 
Gap July 18 and at Winchester on the 24th. In August it moved into Maryland, and, the department being re- 
enforced by the 6lh and 19th Army Corps, the regiment, in command of Major Pratt, shared in General Sheridan's 
campaign and took part in the battles of Opequon and Fisher's Hill, engaging also at Tom's Brook near Strasburg 
October 13, where Colonel Wells was mortally wounded, and at Cedar Creek October 19, engagiug afterward in 
provost duty at Newtown, and moving in November to Opequon Crossing for outpost duty. After Colonel Wells' 
death Col. W. S. Lincoln was promoted to fill his place. 

As part of the 1st Division, Army of WeBt Virginia, the regiment was ordered, December 17, to join the Army of 
the James before Petersburg, and, passing through Washington December 20, spent the autumn and winter of 
1864-65 engaged in the Biege as part of the Independent Division, 24th Army Corps, Army of the James. In January 
Lieutenant-Colonel Potter took command of the brigade, of which the regiment serving under Captain Leach formed 
a part. It shared in the final operations about Petersburg, engaging at Hatcher's Run March 31, and at the final 
assault on the works. It followed General Lee to Appomattox, encamping after the surrender at Lynchburg; and, 
entering Richmond April 25, it remained in camp there until the expiration of its service. It was mustered out June 
15, 1865, and was finally paid off and discharged at Readville, Mass., on July 6. Those who had more time to serve 
were transferred to the 24th Mass. Infantry. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



261 



Thirty-fourth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 










4= 
B 

03 

5 


6 

c 

3 


Companies. 


$ 

63 g 

3 

5 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


en 

3 

o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 


1 


6 


8 

2 
11 
22 


5 


7 


22 


14 


12 


10 


8 


17 
5 


14 
10 


1 


7 

118 








8 


10 


4 


8 


7 


13 

5 


6 


2 


125 




1 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 
75 


Totals, 






12 


11 


4 


5 


4 


3 


3 


1 


3 


76 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 
59 




2 


7 


25 


28 


30 


27 


23 


28 


17 


25 


25 


60 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


9 
253 


• 




























262 



Casualties by Engagements. 
















1803. 

1864. 

May 15, New Market, Va., . 
June 5, Piedmont, Va., 
June 18, Lynchburg, Va., . 
July 18, Snicker's Gap, or Island 

Ford, Va. 
Sept. 3, Berryville, Va , 
Sept. 19, Winchester, or Opequon, 

Va. 
Oct. 13, Strasburg, Stickney's 

Farm, or Cedar Creek, 

Va. 
Oct. 19, Cedar Creek, Va., . 
Place unknown, 

1865. 

March 31, Hatcher's Run, Va., 
April 2, Petersburg, or Fort 

Gregg, Va. 
April 6, Rice's Station, Va , 
Place unknown, 


1 

> 
— *— 


1 

2 

2 
1 


1 

1 
1 

3 
1 


1 
3 

1 


2 
1 

2 

1 
1 


3 

8 
1 
1 

4 
2 

1 
1 

1 


5 

1 
1 

1 
2 

1 

1 
1 


3 
1 

1 

4 
2 

1 


4 

1 
3 

2 


2 
3 

2 

1 


7 
2 

1 

2 
1 

2 
2 


1 

4 
3 
1 

1 
3 

1 


1 


2 

32 

24 

5 

4 

1 
16 

15 

3 

10 

2 
6 

1 
4 



Present also at Martinsburg, Halltown, Fisher's Hill and Appomattox. 



262 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Thirty-fifth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Edward A. Wild, Brig. Gen. TJ. S. Vols. 

(2) Col. Sumner Carrdth, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





83 
oS 
n 

a 
2 


o 

c 

3 


Companies. 


CO 

Si 

c S 

tn 

ct 
C 

!=> 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


00 

3 

o 
E- 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


17 
14 


86 


140 


163 


154 


132 


137 


143 


158 


143 


137 


160 

6 
1 


1 


103 

1,482 


Totals, 


8 


- 


2 

1 


2 
2 


3 
1 


3 
2 


2 


3 


4 
1 


5 
2 


3 
1 


- 


1,585 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


41 
11 


Totals, 


8 

17 
6 


86 


3 
137 


4 
159 


4 
150 


5 
127 


2 
135 


3 

140 


5 
153 


7 
136 


4 
133 


7 
153 


1 


52 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


103 
1,430 


Totals 
























• 


1,533 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 35th Mass. Infantry was organized at Lynnfield, Mass., under the call for three years' regiments, in July, 

1862, and mustered into service on varying dates from August 9 to 19, left the State for Washington on the 22d, 
under Col. Edward A. "Wild. Encamping for a few days near the capital, it was assigned to the 9th Corps, and on 
September 8 joined the 2d Brigade, 2d Division, in Maryland. It took part at the battle of South Mountain, where 
Colonel Wild was severely wounded; was closely engaged with great loss, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel 
Carruth, at Burnside's Bridge during the battle of Antietam, and was active at Fredericksburg under Major Willard, 
who was mortally wounded in the charge on Marye's Heights. Leaving the winter camp for Newport News Feb. 9, 

1863, the regiment formed in March part of the force sent to join General Burnside in the department of the Ohio, 
and, reaching Covington, Ky., March 30, was stationed successively at Mount Sterling, Lancaster and Stanford. In 
June it was sent to reinforce General Grant at Vicksburg, served during the siege and followed General Johnston's 
forces to Jackson, Miss. Returning to Covington August 14, it moved in October to Knoxville, Tenn., took part in 
the operations in the vicinity in November and was on duty in the city during the siege. The regiment returned to 
Annapolis, Md., in April, 3864, and became, under Colonel Carruth, part of the 1st Brigade, General Stevenson's 
Division. It was detailed to guard the supply train of the division at the Wilderness. Rejoining its brigade May 17 
before Spotsylvania, it took part in the assault on the next day and was actively engaged at North Anna May 25. 
Serving under Captain Park as engineer corps for the division, the regiment was active during the operations about 
Cold Harbor and at the siege of Petersburg, taking active part at the Crater July 30, and at the battle of Weldon 
Railroad August 19. Relieved from engineer duty in September, it continued its service in the siege with the 1st 
Brigade during the autumn and winter, joining in the pursuit of Lee's army after the fall of Petersburg in April, 
1865. Receiving the news of Lee's surrender at Farmville, it reached Alexandria April 28, where it spent its remain- 
ing days of service, taking part in the grand review at Washington May 23. On June 9, 1865, the regiment was 
mustered out, those whose term of service had not yet expired being transferred to the 29th Mass. Infantry, and was 
paid off and discharged at Readville, Mass., June 27, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



263 



Thirty -fifth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 





to 

CO 

•a 
c 

s 

£ 


c3 

a 

3 


Companies. 


09 

■at 

3 

c 

p 






A 


B 


C 


D 


B 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


60 

3 

o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 


2 


8 


9 


12 


13 


2 


18 


7 


16 


11 


14 
9 


23 

1 
2 




10 
125 


Totals, 


- 




7 


5 


8 


1 

4 


6 


6 


1 

4 


12 


- 


135 


Missing, 


3~ 


Died by accident or disease, — 


1 
63 


Totals, 


2 


9 


7 
23 


3 
20 


3 
24 


7 


6 
30 


6 
19 


4 
25 


2 
25 


4 
27 


4 
30 


- 


64 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men 


39 


Total losses, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


11 
230 


Totals, 




























241 



Casualties by Engageme?its. 



1863. 

Sept. 14, South Mountain, Md., 
Sept. 17, Antietam, Md., . 
Dec. 13, Fredericksburg, Va., . 

1863. 

Nov. 20-29, Knoxville, Tenn., 

1864. 

May 18, Spotsylvania, Va., 
June 6, Cold Harbor, Va., 
Jul}' 1-4, Before Petersburg, Va., 
July 30, Petersburg,Va. (Crater), 
Aug. 19, Weldon Railroad, Va., 
Sept. 30, Poplar Spring Church, 

Va. 
Dec. 27, Jones House, near 

Petersburg, Va. 
Place unknown, . 

1865. 

April 2, Petersburg, or Fort 
Sedgwick, Va. 
Place unknown, . 


1 
1 


1 
3 
1 

1 
2 


2 
1 

1 

2 
2 

1 


2 

7 

1 

2 


7 
1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

1 


1 
2 


2 
7 
1 

1 

2 
1 

1 

2 
1 


4 

2 

1 


12 

1 

1 
1 
1 

1 


5 
1 

1 

2 
1 


1 
5 
2 

1 

1 

2 

2 


1 

16 

2 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 


- 


9 

68 
9 

1 
2 

6 
1 
3 

12 
6 

12 

1 
3 

3 
2 



Present also at Vicksburg, Campbell's Station, "Wilderness, North Anna, Bethesda Church, Hatcher's 

Run and Fort Mahone. 



264 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Thirty-sixth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

Col. Henry Bowman. 





e 

■O 

a 


3 


Companies. 


» p 

tog 

s 

|3 






A 


B 


O 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


■*-> 

o 
H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


15 
15 


68 


105 


104 


101 


106 


108 


101 


105 


147 


187 


149 


4 


83 
1,232 




6 


- 


3 


4 


4 


2 


1 

1 
2 

106 


2 

1 
3 

98 


3 

1 


5 
1 


3 


3 

_ 


- 


1,315 


Enlisted men (included above) com- 
missioned in regiment. ' 

Enlisted men (included above) serv- 
ing elsewhere within regiment. 


36 
4 


Totals, 


6 

15 
9 


68 


3 
102 


4 
100 


4 
97 


2 
104 


4 
101 


6 
141 


3 

184 


3 
146 


4 


40 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men,' .... 


83 
1,192 


Totals, ..... 










" 


' 







1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 36th Mass. Infantry was organized in the summer of 1862 at Camp John E. Wool, Worcester, in response to 
the President's call tor three years' troops in July. The regiment represented in its members the towns of Charlea- 
town, Winchendon and vicinity, and the eastern and western towns of Worcester County. On September 2 it left 
camp for Washington, under command of Col. Henry Bowman, who had been made prisoner at Ball's Bluff while 
captain of the 15th Infantry, and after his release commissioned major of the 34th Mass. Infantry. It was assigned 
to General Burnside's command and joined the 9th Corps near Sharpsburg, Md., September 21, forming part of the 
3d Brigade, 1st Division. It was present at the battle of Fredericksburg, and moving in February, 1863, to Newport 
News, it left there March 23 to join General Burnside in the department of the Ohio and was posted at Lexington, 
Ky., moving afterward to Nicholasville and Middleburg. It formed part of the forces sent to Vicksburg in June, 
where it took part in the siege aud in the movement to Jackson, Miss. Returning to Kentucky, it moved to Knox- 
ville, Tenn., in September, was active at Blue Springs October 10, was closely engaged at Campbell's Station 
November 16, and was on duty during the siege. It returned to Annapolis, Md., in April, 1864, where by the reor- 
ganization of the 9th Corps it became, under Major Draper, part of the 1st Brigade, 2d Division ; was engaged with 
loss at the Wilderness on May 6 and suffered greatly in the charge at Spotsylvania Court House May 12. On the 
14th and 16th of May a detachment from the 29th Mass. Infantry, which had joined the regiment Jan. 30, 1864, aud 
whose term of service had expired, left for Massachusetts for muster out. Under command of Captain Barker the 
regiment took active part at Cold Harbor June 2, and Bhaied with its division in the assault of Petersburg June 17. 
It was active afterward in the siege, engaging in the operations on the Weldon Railroad in August, at Pegram Farm 
or Poplar Spring Church Sept. 30, and at Hatcher's Run in October. In the latter part of October the 21st Battalion 
Mass. Volunteers was transferred to the 36th Infantry, which was consolidated into companies A to G, the 21st 
Battalion becoming companies H, I and K. After the fall of Petersbuig the regiment moved to Farmville and served 
on provost duty; returning, it reached Alexandria April 28 and encamped at Fort Lyon until its muster out of 
service June 8, 1865. Reaching Massachusetts on the 10th, it was paid off and discharged at Readville June 19, 1865. 
The recruitB and men from the 21st regiment were transferred to the 56lh Mass. Infantry. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



265 



Thirty-sixth Begiment Massachusetts Infantry. 





a 

•a 

5 


3 


Companies. 


so 
c 3 

<* — 






A 


B C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


»5 

« 

-t-> 
o 
H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Enlisted men, .... 






11 
8 


7 


8 


15 


5 

19 

4 
28 


9 


11 


11 


13 
11 


11 

8 

3 
22 




5 
101 








11 


7 


13 

1 
29 


12 


9 


16 


1 

1 


106 




1 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


3 
115 




- 




2 
21 


1 
19 


5 
20 


1 
22 


6 
26 


2 
29 


2 
27 


118 


Died as prisoners, — 

Enlisted men 


27 


Total losses, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


8 

244 


Totals, 
























- 1 252 





Casualties by Engagements. 
















1863. 

Nov. 16, Campbell's Station, 

Tenn. 
Nov. 29, Siege of Knoxville, 

Tenn. 

1864. 

May 5-7, Wilderness, Va., 
May 8-18, Spotsj'lvania, Va., 
May 24, North Anna, Va , 
June 3-7, Cold Harbor (Bethesda 

Church), Va. 
June 17-18, Petersburg, Va., . 
June 24-27, Before Petersburg, Va., 
July-Aug., Petersburg Siege, Va., 
Sept. 30-Oct. 2, Poplar Spring 

Church, Va. 
Dec. 29, Petersburg (Fort Rice), 

Va. 

1865. 

April 2, Fall of Petersburg, Va., 


- 


1 

2 
2 


1 

1 
3 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 


2 

2 

2 
1 


2 
4 
1 

1 


1 

2 
6 

4 

1 

1 


1 
1 

1 
2 


1 

2 
2 
1 


1 

3 
2 

5 


1 

4 
2 

1 

1 
1 

1 


7 
2 

2 

1 
1 

1 


2 

1 
3 
3 

1 

1 


i _ 


3 

6 

1 

23 

25 

2 

20 

12 
2 
5 
5 

1 

1 

1 



Present also at Fredericksburg, Vicksburg, Blue Springs and Hatcher's Bun. 



266 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Thirty-seventh Kegiment Massachusetts Infantry. 
Col. Oliver Edwards, Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





is 

•a 

2 

E 


0J 

a 
3 


Companies. 


Unassigned 
Recruits. 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


cq 

o 
H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


16 
12 


69 


139 


126 


123 


119 


131 


121 


109 


138 


123 


133 


28 


85 
1,302 


Totals, 

Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 1 


4 
2 


- 


3 


3 


3 


3 

1 


2 
1 


5 


7 
1 


2 


3 


3 

3 
130 


- 


1,387 

38 

5 


Totals, 


6 

16 
6 


69 


3 
136 


3 

123 


3 

120 


4 
115 


3 

128 


5 
116 


8 
101 


2 
136 


3 

120 


28 


43 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


85 
1,259 




























1,344 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 37th Mass. Infantry, composed mainly of men from the four western counties of the State, was organized in 
camp at Pittsrield, Mass., in August, 1862. Six companies were mustered August 30, three on September 2, and 
Company K completed its organization on the 4th. The regimeDt left the State September 7, and serving in the 
defences of Washington until ordered to reinforce the army in Maryland, joined the army of the Potomac at Downs- 
ville October 5, and became part of General DevenB' Brigade. It was present at Fredericksburg, and encamped for 
the winter near White Oak Church, taking part in the " mud march " of January, 1863. At Chancellorsville, as part 
of the 6th Corps under Sedgwick, it was in support at Marye's Heights and active at Salem Church, meeting with loss 
at Gettysburg July 3. On July 31 the regiment was detached and ordered to New York for duty during the draft 
riots, rejoining its brigade at Chantilly October 17. It was present at the battle of Rappahannock Station and took 
part in the Mine Run Campaign. As part of Eustis' Brigade, Getty's Division, it was active at the Wilderness, 
losing heavily on May 6, 1864; was closely engaged at the " Angle" at Spotsylvania Court House May 12; shared in 
the movements to North Anna and Cold Harbor, and reached Petersburg June 17, taking part in the charge of the 
next day. In June the re-enlisted men of the 7th and 10th Mass. Infantries were attached to the regiment, and July 
6, by the reorganization of the division, it became under Lieutenant-Colonel Montague part of the 3d Brigade, with 
Colonel Edwards as brigade commander. Forming part of the forces sent to protect Washington against the advance 
of General Early, it reached the city July 12, and went into action immediately at Fort Stevens. It took part in the 
operations against Early in the Shenandoah Valley, suffering loss at Charlestown August 21, and losing more heavily 
at the Opequon September 19, after which it was stationed as provost guard at Winchester. The regiment rejoined 
the Army of the Potomac before Petersburg December 16; engaged at Hatcher's Run in February, 1865; took part 
under Major Tyler in the action of March 25, and served under CaptaiD Hopkins in the final assault of April 2. It 
was actively engaged with loss at Sailor's Creek, and, following Lee's army to Appomattox, it was placed after the 
surrender in guard of the South Side railroad. Returning to the vicinity of Washington June 2, it remained en- 
camped at Bailey's Cross Roads until June 21, when it was mustered out of service, the re-enlisted men being trans- 
ferred to the 20th Mass. Infantry. Returning to Massachusetts, it was paid off and discharged at Readville July 2, 
1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



267 



Thirty-seventh. Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 










fe- 
es 
in 

•a 

a 

3 

s 


<v 

c 

3 


Companies. 


si 

c 

fc) 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


°5 

3 

o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Enlisted men, .... 






17 


26 


16 


14 


13 


16 


12 


15 


11 


10 


3 


4 
153 


Totals, 


- 




8 

2 

28 


9 
3 

38 


6 
22 


9 

2 

25 


8 
1 

22 


6 
22 


6 
18 


10 

3 

29 


8 

1 

20 


5 

1 

16 


1 
1 
5 


157 




2 


Died by accident or disease, — 
Enlisted men, .... 


76 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


14 


Total losses, — 

Enlisted men, ..... 


4 
245 


Totals 


" 


















- 




249 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1863. 

1863. 

May 3, Chan cellor sville 
(Fredericksburg and 
Salem Heights) , Va. 

July 3, Gettysburg, Pa., 

1864. 

May 5-9, Wilderness, Va., 
May 9-21, Spotsylvania, Va., 
June 1-11, Cold Harbor, Va , 
June 16-21, Petersburg, Va., 
July 12, Fort Stevens, D. C , . 
Aug. 21, Charlestown, Va., 
Sept. 19, Winchester, or Ope- 
quon, Va. 
Place unknown, . 

1865. 

April 2, Petersburg, Va., 
April 6, Sailor's Creek, Va., . 
Place unknown, 


- 


3 

1 


6 
2 
1 

1 

2 
4 

1 

1 


1 

10' 
3 
3 
1 

1 

4 

3 


5 
6 
1 

2 
2 


6 
4 

1 
3 


2 

5 
1 

2 

1 
1 

1 


1 

8 
2 
1 
1 

1 
2 


6 

1 

1 
3 

1 


1 

4 
4 
2 

2 

1 

1 


2 
3 
2 
1 

1 

2 


2 

2 

1 
2 

1 

1 
1 


1 
1 
1 


1 

3 

6 

53 

30 

13 

6 

1 

6 

18 

1 

5 
14 

2 



Present also at Rappahannock Station, Mine Run, Hatcher's Run and Appomattox. 



268 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Thirty-eighth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 
Col. Timothy Inghaham, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





00 

C 

a 


d 

c 

3 


Companies. 


SO 

is 

in r ~ 1 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


BQ 

a 
o 

H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


9 
15 

6 


71 


101 


105 


103 


101 


101 


106 


104 


100 


98 


97 


5 


80 
1,036 




2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 
5 


2 


1 
3 


- 


1 


: 


1,116 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


14 
12 


Totals, 


6 

9 
9 


71 


2 
99 


1 
104 


1 
102 


2 
99 


1 
100 


6 
100 


2 

102 


4 
96 


98 


1 

96 


5 


26 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted, men, 1 


80 
1,010 


























1,090 



Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 38th Mass. Infantry was organized in the summer of 1862, in response to the President's call for troops in 
July. Seven companies recruited at Lynnfield, and composed largely of men from Plymouth County, were mustered 
into service August 21; and the remaining three, recruited from Cambridge, were mustered in on the 22d at Camp 
Day, North Cambridge. The command left Boston August 26, under Lieutenant-Colonel Wardwell, and was 
stationed for a time in camp near Baltimore. Col. Timothy iDgraham, at the time of his appointment in the 38th 
holding a commission as lieutenant-colonel of the 18th Mass. Infantry, took command of the regiment September 3. 
It moved in November to Hampton Roads, and having remained on transport for a month, sailed for Mississippi 
and reached Carrollton Jan. 1, 1863, becoming part of the 3d Brigade, 3d Division, 19th Army Corps. Moving to 
Baton Rouge in March, it took part in the advance to Port Hudson on the 14th, and engaged in the Teche expedition, 
meeting with loss at Fort Bisland April 13. Its commander, Lieutenant-Colonel Rodman, was among the killed at 
the assault of Port Hudson May 27, and the regiment met with loss also at the assault on June 14. After sharing in 
the movement to Donaldsonville in July, it occupied camp near Baton Rouge until the spring of 1864. As part of 
the 3d Brigade, 2d Division, it shared in the Red River expedition, remaining with the brigade as garrison at Alex- 
andria until April 12; when detached it moved to Grand Ecore, and served with the 2d Brigade in the return to 
Alexandria, engaging at Cane River April 23. At-lhe battle of Mansura the regiment served under Captain Wyman, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Richardson being in command of the brigade. It formed part of the forces sent to the defence 
of Washington in July, 1864, and served during the summer and autumn under General Sheridan in the Shenandoah 
Valley. At the battle of the Opequon, Lieutenaut-Colonel Richardson was wounded and the command was taken by 
Major Allen. The regiment took pait at Fisher's Hill and met with loss at Cedar Creek. With Lieutenant-Colonel 
Richardson in command of the brigade, the regiment under Major Allen left Winchester Jan. 6, 1865, for Baltimore, 
and was sent a week later to Savannah, Ga., and served there until spring. Moviug in March to Morehead City, it 
served at Goldsboro' during April, and returning to Savannah in May, remained until its termination of service. 
The recruits being transferred to the 26th Mass. Infantry, the regiment returned to MassaBhusetts, and reaching 
Boston July 6, was mustered out at Gallop's Island July 13, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



269 



Thirty-eighth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 










w 

■O 
C 

s 

5 


a 

3 


Companies. 


09 

2 3 

boo 

■ ~ 

C 
& 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


H 

3 




Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 


1 


3 


9 


9 


4 


8 


7 


11 


7 


3 


8 


6 




. 4 
72 




1 

1 
1 


3 


11 
20 


9 

1 

19 


14 

1 

19 


14 

1 

25 


14 

2 

23 


12 
23 


17 

1 

25 


24 

1 

28 


7 
15 


15 

2 

23 


- 


76 


Missing, 


2 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


138 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers 


9 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


4 
221 




























225 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1863. 

April 13, Bisland, La., 
May 27, Port Hudson, La., 
June 14, Port Hudson, La., 
May -June, Port Hudson Siege, 

La 
July 4, Port Hudson, La., 



1864. 

April 13, Red River, La., 
April 19-23, Cane River, La. 



May 3, Red River, La., . 

Sept. 19, Opequon, or Winches- 

Sept. 22, Fisher's Hill, Va , . 

Oct. 19, Cedar Creek, Va., 



1 


1 


2 


2 
3 

1 


_ 


4 


1 


1 
5 
1 


3 


_. 


3 


1 


_ 


1 


4 


1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


2 
1 


1 


- 














1 














- 


1 


1 


- 




- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


- 






2 


3 


1 


2 


4 


1 


2 




2 


1 




— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


~ 



17 
5 

21 
3 



1 

5 

1 

18 

1 

5 



Present also at Mansura. 



270 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Thirty-ninth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Timothy Ingraham, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. (2) Col. P. Stearns Davis. 

(3) Col. Charles L. Peirson, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





5 

c 

ci 
2 


9 

a 
5 


Companies. 


DO 

a 








A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 




Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


13 
13 


62 


133 


144 


135 


139 


144 


136 


131 


135 


145 


132 


5 


75 
1,392 




7 


- 


1 
2 


1 
1 


2 


2 


4 


1 
3 


2 


3 

1 


. 1 


2 
2 


1,467 


Enlisted men (included above) com- 
missioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) serv- 
ing elsewhere within regiment. 


26 
9 


Totals 


7 

13 
6 


62 


3 

130 


2 

142 


2 
133 


2 
137 


4 
140 


4 
132 


2 
129 


4 
131 


1 
144 


4 
128 


1. 

5 


35 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


75 
1,357 






























1,432 



Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 39th Mass. Infantry was organized at Lynnfield, Mass., in the summer of 1862; Co. D was mustered into 
service in July, and the remaining nine companies in August and the early days of September. It left the State for 
Washington September 6, under command of Col. P. Stearns Davis, and was active in guarding the Potomac, being 
posted at Edwards' aud Conrad's ferries, serving in October at Seneca Creek and vicinity, and making winter 
quaneis at Poolesville, Md. It was placed on guard and patrol duty at Washington from April to July, 1864, and 
moving then to Harper's Ferry, joined the Army of the Potomac at Funkstown, becoming part of the 2d Division, 1st 
Coips. It moved with the army to the Rappahannock, took part in the operations in the vicinity and in the Mine 
Run campaign As part of the 1st Brigade, 2d Division, 5th Corps, it was active at the Wilderness May 4-6 and 
shaied in the movement to SpotBylvania, losing at Laurel Hill on May 8 and 10. It moved to Bethesda Church and 
Cold Harbor, and reaching Petersbui g on the morning of June 17, took part in the siege, being assigned, June 24, to a 
position in the vicinity of Jerusalem Plank Road; while heie (on July 11), Colonel Davis was mortally wounded. 
The leyimeiit took part in the movement to the Weldon Railroad in August, and in the battle of the 19th and 20th 
Lieutenani-Col.inel Peirson, in command, was severely wounded, his place being taken by Capt. F. R. Kinsley who 
was made piisoner the following day, leaving the regiment for several months under Captain Nelson. It engaged in 
the expedition to the Weldon Railroad in December, took part at Hatcher's Run iu February, 1865, and Buffered loss 
at Giavclly Run Match 31, when Major Tremlett, who had commanded the regiment since Nov. 5, 1861, was wounded, 
dying from the effects on June 6. The command was active at Five Forks on the next day and followed the Con- 
fedeiate Army to Appomattox, encamping at South Side Railroad after the surrender. It reached Arlington 
Heights May 12 and was mustered out of service June 2, 1865, those whose term of service had not yet expired being 
transferred to the 32d Mass. Infantry. Reaching Massachusetts June 6, it waB paid off and discharged a week later 
at Readville. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



271 



Thirty-ninth 


Regiment Massachusetts Infantry 












si 

(A 

•a 
a 

2 

E 


a 
3 


Companies. 


S 

■a- 

v P 

0] 

e 

t3 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


3 

o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


2 


3 


5 

1 

4 

10 

20 


5 


7 


4 


6 


6 


4 


9 


7 


8 




5 
61 


Totals, 


2 


3 


3 

7 

11 

26 


2 

7 

10 

26 


4 

14 
16 
34 


1 

6 

15 

28 


3 

6 

15 


8 
11 
23 


3 

11 

5 

28 


1 
14 

7 
29 


1 

9 

11 

29 


- 


66' 




12 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


83 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, .... 


102 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


5 

258 






























263 



Casualties by Engagements, 



1863. 

1864. 

May 5, Wilderness, Va., . 
May 8-18, Spotsylvania (Laure 

Hill), Va. 
May 23, North Anna, Va , 
June 17-19, Petersburg, Va., . 
June 22-23, Before Petersburg, Va. 
July 11, Before Petersburg, Va. 
July 16, By Guerillas, 
Aug. 18-19, Weldon Railroad, Va 
Place unknown, . 

1865. 

Feb. 6, Hatcher's Run, or Dab- 
ney's Mills, Va. 

March 31, White Oak Roads, oi 
Gravelly Run, Va. 


i 


1 
1 


1 

1 

1 


1 

1 

2 

1 


6 
1 

1 


6 

1 

1 
1 


1 
2 

1 


3 
1 

2 

1 


3 

1 
1 

1 


3 


2 
2 

1 
4 

1 
1 


2 
1 

4 

1 


6 
2 

1 


- 


1 

3 
33 

1 
8 
2 
1 
1 

17 
1 

' 4 
6 



Present also at Totopotomoy, Bethesda Church and Five Forks. 



272 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fortieth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 



1 :::.:v:.:.?:;.::l. 



: M SotV. _B____raT,Brt._3r__.. Gen. r. 5 Vols. 



- 


\ 








c 


I ___..__"___. 










~ »_ 

IT 

= 








A 3 


c 


D 


g J 


G 


■__" 


I 


K 




_Ntn__- • ___gj_-_-_-_-f_-l_n__-k — 




M - 119 


- 


- 

100 


- 
100 


_ 

99 


101 


90 


99 


_ 
99 


■ 


1 


98 

1,022 


Totals, ..... 


_ _ 


3 

1 


_ 

i 


4 


3 
3 


- 

4 


3 


5 

1 


4 


3 

1 


_ 




1,120 


E -ted mem (included a.b 


11 


- 


46 


v : 5c :r .-. ;: :_- _rf _.". :t? 

HOT Wg t _______ 1 - - 

_____:". 


7 


Totals, . 


11 - 

:: - 
- 


-: 


4 


4 


6 


95 




6 


4 


4 
95 


94 


1 


S3 


Actual r.-.: —«—»■*■ o_ --. 

nent. — 

Unlisted men, 1 .... 


98 

959 








" 


' 


" " 




_ 


' 




: :■-.- 



=_.-. i . i -uf. 



. 40th ___ase. I_____nt_y -was organize . _ __aaf - ._i-.:i L.--i____ie_d,__La--_., in the Bummer of 3552; four companies 

. • " .riber; Company G, tbe taal to be 

filled, being mustered 6ep_e_r.be. '. I ■ mand of Lieat.-Col. Joseph A. Dalton, 

•--.--.-". _-.Lt Wa___iij--_i -_ . -. .- ; mem remained 

on p. . - t Ehe ~aalui_gljOL .. tag '.he autumn _____! -•_._- -__' i»,62-53; i: moved to 

Suffolk April ! - 12 a reco_mo___6anee on April 24 and another on 

■ i:;t after lie ra ____.? : ' _ ; : iz : i _ 

Cross Soa:- . . ; _. ~t. bom ___.it returned to Washington July 11, and moving t. 

_________ i 1 t ; _ -__ I -. :" 1.. ■ ■ . ___■ • _ . g •■__:_•._ 7; ; !__________, B. C, 

■•- " : ".•.: _.::-_•_. tv the __________________■_ Li Bin err be.-, ColoDel I - l 

T _\ u ; i_ u appointed colonel, and took command of the regi- 

ment Kb pun be: R . . . ae mrawtert infantry at Hilton Head in Ji- 4, to 

- " ■ -.._- •'jer'sror. .*:.. :i -.he 2-th. A detachment of the regiment 

under Captain Marshall ______ i Unmounted, the regiment Joiaed Bel 

Butte- '--._ruo__s_err-.it "_.., and aha- . I gementeat Arrowfieid Church and Drewry'e 

Bluff- Beconr;- .fined the Axbj :'. the Potomac at C&ld Harbor June 1, and -sreit it -.ite 

: •. . _.:■: . : - . f ■ • •_ _ - • iir_.j-.it- _.?_..! _.'_".- . ; '. i " i . ':■. . . ■__.-. i . - r . :e - . . -i- '..:.'. ' . . . • _ ■ _--■..: 

on tii . i shared _ • .nches August 27, the regimen* sen-fed 

Em i month on i the BganlJeae about Bermuda Hundred. 

Mi winter camp at Chat ■ Cm _Hm_km Mm .--... and share-. ■ _■ brigade . 

.::■-._ • . r • . . t - •_• . - t _.n_ U Wl . Hi _J__ l_____i ;^ _: -.1:1^1 B .1-1.1: . : . ;. .-. I a _■__] i.- Mai ::■-. 

and on the SSth mored to Kanch.- ■ ae -Mated until mustered out of eerrice, Jane 17, Mfc. 

■ - •. -. . • 11. . . • .-...." ._.-_• .".-...:.: 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



273 



Fortieth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 





Id 

3 

CQ 

■a 
c 
a 


V 

C 
3 


COMPANIES. 


•O — 

Is 

s 

c 






A 


B 


O 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


00 

a 

o 

EH 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 


4 


8 


10 


5 


8 


5 


4 


6 


8 


3 


8 




5 
65 


Totals, 


1 


4 


8 

4 

20 


1 

17 

28 


1 
11 

5 
22 


7 
15 


8 
13 


2 
13 

19 


8 

1 

15 


9 
17 


14 
17 


18 

1 

27 




- 


70 


Missing 


4 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, .... 


113 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


11 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


5 
193 






i 






















198 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1863. 

1864. 

Feb. 10, St. Mary's Creek, or 

Barber's Ford, Fla. 
Feb. 20, Olustee, Fla., 
March 1, Cedar Run, Fla., 
May 15-16, Drewry's Bluff, Va., . 
May 20, Hatchies, Va., . 
June 1-6, Cold Harbor, Va., 
June 17, Petersburg, Va., . 
June-Aug , Before Petersburg, Va., 
July 30, Petersburg, Va. (Crater), 
Sept. 30, Chapin's Farm, near 
Fort Harrison, Va. 


1 


'2 

1 


1 

2 
2 
2 

1 


11 


4 


2 
5 

1 


1 
1 

2 
1 


2 
3 
1 


4- 
2 


2 
4 

2 


1 
1 

1 


2 
1 
2 

2 
1 


- 


1 

1 

3 
1 

15 
7 

37 
1 
6 
1 
1 



Present also at the Black Water, Fort Sumter, Charleston, Ten Mile Run, Jacksonville and Fair Oaks. 



274 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Forty-second Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia),* 

9 Months' and 100 Days' Service. 

Col. Isaac S. Burrell (9 months and 100 days). 





Ha 

es 

CO 

■a 
c 
a 

s 

s 


3 


Companies. 


CO 

v r: 
B o 
coed 
CO 

a 




' 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


"5 

O 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
9 months, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 


9 
6 


32 


95 


92 


89 


86 


84 


89 


94 


84 


92 


89 
90 




41 
900 




6 
5 


30 


95 


81 


92 


95 


90 


98 


87 


88 


84 


- 


941 


100 days,— 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 


36 
905 


Totals, .... 


9 
6 


32 


95 


1 

1 
91 


89 


1 

85 


1 

1 

83 

90 


89 


94 


84 


92 

84 


89 
90 


941 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment, — 
9 months, .... 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment, — 

100 days 

Totals, — 

100 days, 


2 

1 
3 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 
9 months, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 


41 

897 


Totals, .... 


6 
5 


30 


95 


81 


92 


95 


98 


87 


88 





938 


100 days, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 


36 
905 


Totals, 






















941 



* The 41st Mass. Infantry became the 3d Mass. Cavalry. 



Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 2d Regiment of militia, which volunteered under the call for nine months' troops in the autumn of 1862, 
formed the nucleus of the 42d Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, completing its organization under that name in 
November. The regiment was ordered to join the Department of the Gulf, and left the State November 21 for the 
rendezvous at Long Island, N. T. It left for Mississippi in four detachments early in December. Companies D, 
G and I under Colonel Burrell, reaching Carrolllon on the 17th, were ordered to Galveston, Tex., and, co-operating 
with the naval forces, established a poBt on the island. On Jan. 1, 1863, the three companies after repulsing an 
assault were taken prisoners. Most of the men were paroled February 18 with Chaplain Geo. J. Sanger, uncon- 
ditionally released, and a parole camp was established at Bayou Gentilly, which they occupied until the termination 
of their service. Colonel Burrell, Surgeon A. J. Cummings, the officers of companies D, G and I, with Lieutenant 
Stowell of Company E, were held in prison, where Surgeon Cummings and Lieutenant Bartlett died during the 
summer. The remaining officers were exchanged July 22, 1864. The other three detachments, having been delayed, 
reached New Orleans on December 29, January 1 and 14, and were reunited and assigned to the 2d Brigade, 2d 
Division, 19th Corps. "With headquarters near Bayou Gentilly on the Ponchartrain Railroad, the regiment, under 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



275 



Forty-second Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 





to 
















■Q 






CO 

13 
C 
cS 

H 
3 


OD 

a 

3 








Companies. 






en" 
03 

P 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


ED 

3 

o 
H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
9 months, — 

Enlisted men, 
100 days,— 

Enlisted men, 


1 


- 


1 
1 


1 

3 
2 


3 
1 


1 
1 


1 

5 


2 
6 


1 

6 
3 


1 

3 

1 


2 


9 


- 


4 


Died by accident or disease, — 
9 months, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 
100 days,— 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 


36 
15 


Died as prisoners, — 
9 months, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 


1 


1 


- 


- 




3 






1 











2 
4 
























6 


100 days, — 
Enlisted men, 




Total losses, — 
9 months, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 


1 
1 


1 


1 


4 


3 
1 


4 


6 


2 


8 


4 


2 


9 




2 
44 


Totals, .... 


_ 


_ 


1 


2 


1 


- 


6 


3 


1 


- 


— 


: 


46 


100 days, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 


15 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 





Casualties by Engagements. 
















1863. 

Jan. 1, Galveston, Tex , 

June 21, La Fourche Crossing, La., 

June 23, Brashear City, La., . 


- 


r- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 
1 

2 



command of Lieutenant-Colonel Stedman, served during the remainder of the winter, by detachments of one or two 
companies, separately located. Companies C and H under Captain Leonard and Company K under Lieutenant 
Harding were detailed for engineer duty. Five of the companies were reunited at headquarters in June. A 
detachment under Lieutenant Tinkham took part in the action at La Fourche Crossing June 21, and a detachment 
under First SergeaDt George W. Ballou suffeied loss in the uttack and capture of BraBhear City on the 23d. The 
regiment spent the remainder of its service stationed at New Orleans and Algiers, and on July 31 prepared for its 
return to Massachusetts. It reached Boston August 10 and was mustered out at Readville Aug. 20, 1863. 

In the summer of 1864 the regiment was recruited and reorganized for one hundred days' service, with the same 
field officers. It left the State July 24 under Lieutenant-Colonel Stedman, and Colonel Burrell returning from his 
prison confinement, joined the command at Alexandria, where it spent its term of service on guard and patrol duty, 
detachments serving in guard of supply trains to the Shenandoah "Valley. It was mustered out of service Nov. 11, 
1864. 



276 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Forty-third Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 

COL. r CHAKLES L. HOLBROOK. 





m 
■0 

5 
S 


3 


Companies. 


St 

Bg 

at 

a 







A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I K 


CO 

o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men,' .... 


9 
5 


31 


68 


75 


92 


97 


98 


95 


96 


96 


94 


92 




40 
908 














1 


1 












~ 


948 


Enlisted men (included above) com- 
missioned in regiment. 

Enlisted men (included above) serv- 
ing elsewhere within regiment. 


1 
1 




9 

5 


31 


68 


75 


92 


1 
96 


1 
97 


95 


96 


96 


94 


92 


2 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


40 
906 


Totals 


















- 




946 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 43d Infantry Mass. Volunteer Militia, commonly known as the "Tiger Regiment," had for its nucleus the 
2d Battalion, 1st Brigade, 1st Division, M. V. M. Volunteering for nine months' service, this Battalion completed 
its organization atReadville, Mass., as the 43d Infantry, M. V. M., and was mustered into service on varying dates 
from Sept. 12 to Oct. 25, 1862. It left camp November 5 under command of Col. Charles L. Holbrook, and em- 
barking for Beaufort, N. C, arrived November 15 and went into camp on the Trent River. Company C under com- 
mand of Capt. Wm. B. Fowle, Jr., was soon afterward stationed on detached duty at New Berne, remaining until 
March 4, 1863. The regiment, as part of General Foster's forces, was engaged in the G-oldsboro' expedition in 
December, 1862, was active at the battles of Kinston, Whitehall and Goldsboro', and shared in the expedition to 
Trenton, N. C, in January, 1863. In April it formed part of the forces sent for the relief of Washington, N. C., 
meeting the enemy at Blount's Creek April 9 and later supplying volunteers for duty in running the blockade during 
the siege. It served afterward in the vicinity of New Berne until June 24, when it left for Fortress Monroe, arriving 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



277 



Forty-third Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 





a 

w 

•a 
a 

a 

£ 


GO 


Companies. 


CO 

pi 

biS cu 

on" 
a 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


3 

o 
H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


- 


- 


- 


3 
3 


1 

1 


1 
1 


2 
2 


3 
3 


- 


- 


1 
1 

2 


3 
3 


- 


3 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


12 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 




Total losses, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


15 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1863. 

Dec. 16, Whitehall, N. C, 
Dec. 17, Goldsboro', N. C, 



the 27th, and after reporting to General Dix on the Pamunkey River encamped at Hampton, Va. It was ordered to 
Baltimore July 2, and the term of service of most of the menhaving expired, some of them returned to Massachusetts 
for muster out. Two hundred and three of the officers and men remained in service, engaging in provost duty at 
Sandy Hook, Md., until July 18, when the command was ordered to Massachusetts, and reaching Boston July 21, 
was mustered out of service at Readville July 30, 1863. 



278 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Forty-fourth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 

Col. Francis L. Lee. 





03 
■w 
« , 

•a 

5 
2 

5 


9 

3 


Companies. 


CO 

■a- 

00 " 

a 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


n 

3 

o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


9 
5 


34 


96 


96 


97 


98 


98 


97 


95 


97 


98 


98 




43 
975 




9 
5 


34 


96 


96 


97 


98 


98 


1 
96 


95 


97 


98 


1 
97 


1,018 


Enlisted men (included above) com- 
missioned in regiment. 

Enlisted men (included above) serv- 
ing elsewhere within regiment. 


2 


Actual total of. members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


43 

973 






























1,016 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 4th Battalion Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, the nucleus of the 44th Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, 
was organized at Boston, May 27, 1862, to serve during the pleasure of the President. It was commanded by Maj. 
Francis L. Lee and was mustered out May 31, 1862. Volunteering for nine months' service it completed its organiza- 
tion at Readville, Mass., as the 44th Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, and was mustered into the United States 
service Sept. 12, 1862, Major Lee of the 4th Battalion becoming colonel. It left the State October 22 for New 
Berne, N.C., and was assigned to Colonel Stevenson's brigade. It engaged soon after its arrival in the Tarboro' 
expedition and met the enemy at Rawles' Mills November 2. It took part in the expedition to Goldsboro' in 
December, received losses at "Whitehall and was in reserve at Goldsboro'. It occupied headquarters at New 
Berne until March, 1863. Companies B and F under Captain Storrow were sent on picket duty to Batchelder's 
Creek, where they remained until May 1. The remainder of the regiment left for Washington, N. C, March 15 and 
occupied the town during the siege. Returning, it reached New Berne April 24 and remained on provost duty until 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



279 



Forty-fourth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 








$ 

in 

•a 
a 

OS 
■O 

S 


o5 

s 

3 


Companies. 


CO 

49 

•a-s 
s 2 

boa? 
w 

03 
C 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Enlisted men, .... 

Died by accident or disease, — 

Enlisted men, .... 






4 
4 

8 


2 


4 
5 


- 


1 


4 


4 


1 


3 


1 
2 


- 


10 

1 

25 








2 


9 




1 


4 


1 
5 


1 


3 


3 




26 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 


Total losses, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 
36 


Totals, 






V 






















37 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1862. 

Nov. 2, Rawles' Mills, N. C, 
Dec. 16, Whitehall, N. C, 



- 


- 


4 

4 


- 


1 

3 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 



2 
8 



the termination of Ub service. Reaching Boston June 10, it was mustered out of service at Readville, Mass., June 
18, 1863. On account of the danger of draft riot the regiment was called into service July 13, 1803, and dismissed 
July 21, 1863. 



280 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Forty-fifth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 

Col. Charles R. Codman. 





fa 

(A 

■a 
c 
a) 

s 


a? 

c 

3 


Companies. 


m 

•4-3 

c 

& 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


S3 

3 

o 

EH 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Officers, . ■ . 
Enlisted men," .... 


9 
4 

9 

4 


31 
31 


98 


95 


96 


92 


93 


88 


94 


84 


93 


82 




40 
919 




98 


95 


96 


92 


93 


88 


1 
93 


84 


93 


82 


959 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 

Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


1 

40 
918 


Totals, 


























958 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 45th Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, was mustered into the service of the United States at Readville, 
Mass., on varying dates from Sept. 26 to Oct. 28, 1862, and was known as the " Cadet Regiment," from the fact that 
its field officers and many of its line officers were drawn from the 1st Corps Cadets. Under command of Col. 
Charles R. Codman it embarked for New Berne, ST. C , November 5, and arriving, was assigned to Colonel Amory's 
brigade. In December eight companies, two being on detached service, took part in the Groldsboro' expedition 
and were actively engaged at Kinston and Whitehall. Located with headquarters near New Berne, it shared in 
the reconnoissance to Trenton, N. C, in January, 1863, and served afterward as provost guard at New Berne until 
April 25. As part of Amory's brigade it engaged in an expedition to Core Creek, going into action on the Dovei 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



281 



Forty-fifth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 








ft! 

«? 

~- 

m 
■o 
c 

oj 
5 

S 


0) 

a 

>3 


Companies. 


09 

c 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 


- 




1 
5 

6 


1 
2 

3 


1 
1 


3 

3 

6 


3 
3 

6 


1 
4 

5 


1 
1 


4 
5 

9 


3 

2 

5 

i 


4 

1 

5 


- 


20 


Died by accident or disease, — 
Enlisted men, .... 


27 


Died as prisoners, — 




Total losses, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


47 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1863. 

Dec. 14, Kinston, N. C. 
Dec. 16, Whitehall, N. C., 



1863. 

April 28, Dover Road, N. C, 



- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


3 


2 
1 


1 


- 


3 
1 


2 

1 


4 


- 



16 
3 



Road April 28. Remaining afterward in the vicinity of Fort Bpinola until the termination of its service, it broke 
camp for the return to Massachusetts June 24, and reaching Boston June 30 was mustered out at Readville, Mass., 
July 8, 1863. 



282 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Forty-sixth. Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 

(1) Col. George Bowler. (2) Col. William S. Shurtleff. 





a 

s 

£ 


3 


Companies. 


if 

S 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


BO 

3 

o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men,' .... 


9 
5 


34 


97 


77 


85 


95 


82 


95 


98 


95 


97 


85 




43 , 
911 






- 


1 

1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


- 


1 




954 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


5 
2 


Totals, . . . 


9 
5 


34 


2 
95 


1 
76 


85 


95 


1 
81 


2- 
93 


98 


95 


1 

96 


85 


7 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


43 

904 


Totals, 






















i 






947 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 46th Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, was recruited in camp at Springfield, Mass., during September 
and October, 1862, largely through the efforts of Rev. Geo. Bowler, who became colonel of the regiment, although 
early in the service (Jan. 23, 1863), obliged to resign on account of ill health. It was mustered in from Sept. 
24 to Oct. 30, 1862, and was ordered to New Berne, N. C. Arriving November 15, it became part of Colonel 
Lee's brigade and encamped near the town; two companies under Captain Spooner were detached for duty at New- 
port barracks. The regiment, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Shurtleff, took part in the Goldsboro* expe- 
dition and remained in camp near the Trent River during the winter. It shared in the reconnoissance on the Trent 
road March 13, formed part of the garrison at Plymouth, N. C, in April, and shared in the movement to Gum 
Swamp May 21-22. Two companies left behind in the defences of New Berne were engaged May 23 at Batchelder's 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



283 



Forty-sixth Regiment Massachusetts 


Infantry 


(Militia). 








00 

a 

03 

2 


C 
3 


Companies. 


11 

03 

e 

t3 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


BO 

O 


Killed and died of wounds, — 


- 


- 


3 

3 


1 


1 
1 


2 
2 


3 
3 


12 
12 


4 
4 


3 
3 


- 


4 
4 




1 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


32 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 




Total losses, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


33 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1862. 

Dec. 17, Goldsboro', N. C , 



Creek. In the spring of 1863 over one hundred members of the regiment enlisted in the 2d Mass. Heavy Artillery 
then forming. The regiment embarked for Fortress Monroe June 24, and volunteering for further service, its 
time having nearly expired, was stationed on guard duty at Baltimore, Md., taking up its position at Marye's 
Heights July 7 as part of a brigade under Gen. H. S. Briggs. It joined the Army of the Potomac at Funkstown, 
and while moving with it into Virginia received orders to return to Massachusetts for muster out. It reached 
Springfield, Mass., July 21, 1863, and was mustered out of service a week later at Hampden Park. 



284 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Forty-seventh Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 

Col. Lucius B. Mahsh. 





la 

a 

in 
■O 

e 

s 

S 


3 


Companies. 


to 

si 

ca 

c 

fc3 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


CD 

3 

o 
Eh 


Number on regimental rolls , — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


9 

7 


33 


95 


85 


98 


79 


92 


82 


94 


78 


79 


66 

1 




42 

855 


Totals, 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 
1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 
1 


- 


897 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


3 
4 


Totals, 


9 

7 


33 


1 

94 


85 


2 

96 


79 


92 


82 


94 


78 


3 

76 


1 
65 




7 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


42 
848 




























- 


890 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 47th Mass. Infantry, also known as the Merchants' Guard Regiment, was recruited in the autumn of 186fcpt 
Camp Stanton, Boxford, Mass., through the efforts of Lucius B. Marsh of Boston, who became colonel of the regi- 
ment. The companies being mustered in on varying dates from September 19 to October 31, and the field and staff 
on November 7, the regiment moved to Readville November 11, and on the 29th was ordered to New York; and 
leaving to join the forceB in the Department of the Gulf, reached New Orleans December 31. The commaud was 
sent for a few days to Carrollton, and returning to New Orleans served until March at United States Barracks and 
Louisiana Lower Cotton Press, Company E being detached for provost duty at Thibodeaux. On March 12 the regi- 
ment, reunited (with the exception of Company B, which remained throughout its service as guard for commissary 
and ordnance stores at New Orleans), was ordered to the Metaire Race-course, moving in May to Camp Parapet, 
where it spent the remainder of its service. The 2d Louisiana Engineer Regiment, recruited at this time, drew 
its officers largely from the ranks of the 47th. The regiment left Carrollton August 5, its term of service having 
expired, reached Boston August 18 and was muBtered out at Readville Sept. 1, 1863. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



285 



Forty-seventh Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 





s 

•a 

c 

cS 

2 
E 


a 
3 


Companies. 


09 

■g-3 

■Sc5 
c 




■ 


A 


B 1 C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


03 

o 
Eh 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 
1 


1 
1 


3 




3 


2 


1 
4 


3 


6 


6 


4 


1 




1 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


1 

33 


Totals, 


3 




3 


2 


5 


3 


6 


6 


4 


1 




34 


Died as prisoners, — 

Enlisted men 




Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


1 

34 


Totals, 




























35 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 

Casualties by Engagements. 



1863. 

June 28, By Guerillas, 



1 



286 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Forty-eighth. Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 

Col. Eben F. Stone. 





S3 

CO 

•a 

S3 
OS 

2 

41 

E 


oi 

C 

3 


Companies. 


CO 

•as 

b| 

to 03 

so 
id 

& 






A 


B 


O 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


CO 

"3 

O 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men,' .... 


9 
5 


38 


94 

1 
1 


89 


95 


94 


91 


65 


52 


81 


53 


61 




47 
780 




1' 


- 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 

1 


1 


- 


1 


1 
1 

60 


" 


827 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


10 
3 


Totals, 


1 

9 
4 


38 


2 
92 


1 
88 


2 
93 


1 
93 


1 
90 


2 
63 


1 
51 


81 


1 

52 




13 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


47 
767 






























814 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



Eight companies of infantry were recruited at Camp Lander, Wenham, Mass., to form, as an Essex County 
organization, the 48th Infantry, MaBS. Volunteer Militia, under Col. Eben F. Stone of Newburyport, but on account 
of the immediate demand for troops for the Banks expedition, four companies of men recruiting at Lakeville to form 
an Irish regiment were consolidated with six of these companies and formed in that manner the 48th Infantry; 
the remaining two original Essex County companies were detached to fill the ranks of the 4th Infantry, Mass. 
Volunteer Militia, then being organized at Lakeville for its nine months' term of service. The 48th left the State 
for New York Dec. 27, 1862, sailed Jan. 4, 1863, for Fortress Monroe and reached New Orleans February 1. It was 
Bent, two days later, to Baton Rouge, and became part of the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 19th Army Corps. It took 
part in a reconnoissance toward Port Hudson March 13 and joined the next day in the general advance of the forces 
to that place. It was engaged at Plains Store, and was most actively engaged at the assault on Port Hudson May 
27, providing ninety-three volunteers from its ranks for the storming party, among them Lieutenant-Colonel O'Brien, 
who was killed in the action. It suffered loss again on June 14, forming temporarily part of the 3d Division. In 
the movement to Donaldsonville, the regiment met with loss at Bayou La Fourche July 13. It was stationed in camp 
near Donaldsonville until August 1, when it returned to Baton Rouge and on the 9th left for Massachusetts, its term 
of service having expired. It arrived at Boston August 23 and was mustered out at Camp Lander Sept. 3, 1863. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



287 



. Forty-eighth Regiment 


Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 








s 

■w 

•a 

c 

03 

2 
£ 


oj 

C 

3 


Companies. 


m 

-OS 

a- 5 

Is 

tfifj* 

C 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


08 

3 

o 
H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Enlisted men, .... 






3 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 








1 




1 

12 








2 


8 


3 


10 


4 


4 


5 


6 


3 


5 




13 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 
50 




1 


1 


5 


10 


5 


11 


6 


5 


5 


6 


3 


6 




51 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 




Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


2 
62 


Totals, 


























64 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1863. 

May 21, Plains Store, or Port Hud- 
son, La. 

May 27, Port Hudson, La., . 

June 12-14, Port Hudson Siege, 
La. 

July 8, Baton Rouge, La , . 

July 13, Bayou La Fourche, or 
Donaldsonville, La. 











1 




1 














1 


- 


1 

2 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


-- 


1 


- 


— 


~~ 


~ 


1 


1 


~* 


~ 


■■ 


~~ 


— 


■■ 


"" 


~ 



5 

4 

1 

1 



288 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Forty-ninth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 

Col. William F. Bartlett, Bvt. Maj. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





3 
m 
•a 

3 
2 

s 


V 

3 


Companies. 


CO 

° c 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


tq 

o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


8 
4 


32 


87 


88 


81 


85 


94 


87 


87 


68 


77 


81 




40 

839 




8 
4 


32 


1 
86 


88 


1 
80 


1 
84 


94 


87 


87 


68 


77 


81 




879 


Enlisted men (included above) com- 
missioned in regiment. 

Enlisted men (included above) serv- 


3 


ing elsewhere within regiment. 

Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


40 

836 


Totals, 
























876 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 49th Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, recruited entirely in Berkshire County, was mustered into~service 
at Camp Briggs, Pittsfield, from Sept. 18 to Oct. 28, 1863, and moving to Camp Wool, Worcester, completed its 
organization by the election of officers, William F. Bartlett being made colonel, and left, the State November 29 for 
New York. As part of the Banks expedition it sailed for Louisiana January 24, and reaching Baton Rouge was 
assigned to the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 19th Corps. It took part in the movement to Port Hudson in March, and 
engaged at Plains Store May 21. At the assault on Port Hudson May 27, Colonel Bartlett and Lieutenant-Colonel 
Sumner were wounded and the regiment remained under command of Major Plunkett during the remainder of its 
service, engaging actively throughout the siege. Moving to Donaldsonville after the surrender, it took part at Bayou 
La Fourche July 13 and remained encamped near Donaldsonville until August 1, moving then to Baton Rouge. 
Returning to Massachusetts it reached Pittsfield August 22 and was mustered out of service Sept. 1, 1863. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



289 



Forty-ninth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 





Oj 
01 

■a 
a 

S 


c 

3 


Companies. 


CO 
Si 

C 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


3 

o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


- 


2 


2 


6 


2 


3 


1 

12 
13 


1 




4 




6 




2 
25 


Totals, 

Missing 


- 




1 
5 

8 


13 
19 


5 

7 


10 
13 


8 
9 


5 

5 


6 
10 


11 

11 


11 
17 


- 


27 
1 


Died by accident or disease, — 
Enlisted men, .... 


86 


Died as prisoners, — 

Enlisted men, .... 




Total losses, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


2 
112 


Totals, 




























114 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1863. 

May 27, Port Hudson, La., 
June 14, Port Hudson, La., 
June 20-23, Port Hudson Siege, La., 
July 13, Bayou La Fourche, or 
Donaldsonville, La. 
Place unknown, . 



- 


2 


2 
1 


5 
1 


1 
1 


3 


1 


1 


- 


3 
1 


- 


5 

1 


— 



22 
1 
2 
2 



290 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fiftieth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 
Col. Carlos P. Messeb,. 





03 

00 

•a 

a 

03 

s 

% 


«5 

3 


Companies. 


03 

•d-5 

&g 

to" 

C3 
C 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


03 

o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


9 
5 


30 


95 


88 


80 


97 


84 


91 


88 


92 


86 


98 




39 
904 




9 
5 


30 


95 


88 


80 


97 


84 


91 


88 


92 


86 


1 
97 


- 


943 


Enlisted men (included above) com- 
missioned in regiment. 

i 

Enlisted men (included above) serv- 
ing elsewbere within regiment. 

Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


1 


39 
903 






















942 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 50th Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, had for its nucleus the 7th Regiment Mass. Militia, made up of men 
from EsBex and Middlesex counties. Recruited to the required numbers at Camp Edwin M. Stanton, Boxford, it 
left camp under Col. Carlos P. Messer for New York November 19, to become part of General Banks' forces in the 
Department of the Gulf. Owing to the lack of means of transportation, it was sent to Louisiana by detachments, 
and Company I, sailing December 1, arrived much in advance of the others and was attached to the 30th Mass. 
Infantry at Baton Rouge until the arrival of companies A, E and K, about February 5. The remaining six com- 
panies, leaving Philadelphia January 9, were separated at Fortress Monroe, and companies C, F and G were enabled 
to join the detachment at Baton Rouge February 14; but the remaining three companies, under Lieutenant-Colonel 



MASSACHUSETTS 'VOLUNTEERS. 



291 



Fiftieth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 





la 
3 

-*» 

d 

s 


c5 

c 

3 


Companies. 


3 

0) g 

a 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Enlisted men, .... 




- 


8 


15 


2 


12 


8 


1 
6 


5 


4 


8 


19 


- 


1 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 

87 








8 


15 


2 


12 


8 


7 


5 


4 


8 


19 




88 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 




Total losses, — 

Enlisted men 


1 

88 






























89 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1863. 

May 27, Port Hudson, La., 

















1 













Locke, being delayed in quarantine at New Orleans, did not rejoin the command until April 2. The regiment was 
assigned to the 3d Brigade, 1st Division, 19th Corps, and shared in the movement to Port Hudson March 14, and four 
companies took part in an expedition to the Bayou Monticeno, on the road to Port Hudson, April 9. It was active 
during the siege of Port Hudson, takiug part in the assault of May 27. After the surrender it was detailed on 
garrison duty within the fortifications until its termination of service. It returned to Massachusetts by the way of 
Cairo, 111., reaching Boston August 11, and was mustered out of service at Wenham Aug. 24, 1863. 



292 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fifty-first Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 

Col. Augustus B. K. Sprague, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





03 
go 

■O 

c 

03 
■O 


oi 
C 

2 


Companies. 


OB 

OJ 3 

a u 

JfS 

03 

S 
D 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


03 

o 

H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


9 
4 


33 


99 


91 


90 


86 


88 


88 


78 


83 


93 


79 




42 
879 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


- 


- 


921 
5 
1 


Totals, 


9 
4 


33 


1 
98 


1 

90 


1 

89 


86 


88 


88 


1 
77 


83 


2 
91 


79 


- 


6 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men,i .... 


42 
873 


























915 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 51st Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, was recruited in Worcester County, Mass., in the summer and autumn 
of 1862, and, mustered into service from September 25 to November 11, it left the State November 25, under command 
of Col. A. B. R. Sprague, who had already served as captain of the 3d Battalion Rifles, Mass. Volunteer Militia, and 
as lieutenant-colonel of the 25th Infantry, having taken part at Roanoke Island and New Berne. The regiment, 
ordered to North Carolina, arrived at Beaufort November 30, and, moving to New Berne, was assigned to Colonel 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



293 



Fifty-first Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 





CO 

•O 

a 
2 


c 

13 


Companies. 


00 

IB™ 

us 

a 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


00 

"3 

o 
H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


- 


- 


7 


3 


7 


2 


7 


4 


1 


3 


3 


3 


- 




Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


40 


Died as prisoners, — 

Enlisted men, .... 





Amory's brigade and took part in the expedition to Goldsboro' In the early part of December. Company G, under 
Capt. T. D. Kimball, was detached December 30 for outpost duty at Brice's Ferry, and remained there throughout 
its stay in North Carolina. In January, 1863, the regiment shared in the reconnoissance to Trenton, and served in 
March on garrison duty at various points on the railroad between New Berne and Morehead City, and also at Beau- 
fort and Evans' Mills. Returning to New Berne May 4, it encamped near the Trent River until ordered, June 24, to 
Fortress Monroe. Volunteering for further service (the term of service of many of the companies having expired), 
the command moved to Baltimore, and, forming part of General Briggs' brigade, was stationed at Marye's Heights. 
It joined the Army of the Potomac at Funkstown and took part in the pursuit of the Confederates. On July 17 it 
received orders to return to Massachusetts, and reached Worcester, Mass., July 21, where it was mustered out of 
service July 27, 1863; 



294 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fifty-second Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 

Col. Halbert S. Greenleaf. 





d 

00 

c 
a 


CO 

a 

3 


Companies. 


.SfS 

a 








A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


TO 

5 

c 
Eh 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 . , . 


9 

4 


30 


92 


94 


85 


93 


86 


97 


80 


88 


87 


88 




39 
894 


Totals, 


9 

4 


30 


92 


94 


1 

84 


93 


86 


97 


80 


88 


87 


88 




933 


Enlisted men (included above) com- 
missioned in regiment. 

Enlisted men (included above) serv- 
ing elsewhere within regiment. 


1 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


39 

893 

































1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 52d Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, was recruited in Franklin and Hampshire counties, and having com- 
pleted its organization in camp at Greenfield, Mass., it left the State November 20 for New Tork, under command 
of Col. Halbert S. Greenleaf, to form part of the Banks' expedition. It reached Baton Rouge December 17 and 
became part of the 2d Brigade, Grover's Division, 19th Army Corps. It remained in Camp at Baton Rouge for the 
winter, and in March took part in the movement to Port Hudson. During the Teche expedition it shared in the 
movements of Grover's Division, being in reserve at the battle of Indian Ridge April 14. Four companies were 
detached to serve as provost guard at New Iberia, and the remaining six companies, continuing the march to 
Opelousas, formed part of the force stationed at Barre's Landing until May 21. Joined by the companies left at 
New Iberia, it set out on its return to Brashear City and joined its brigade before Port Hudson May 30. As part 
of General Paine's force it shared in the march to Clinton June 5-8, was active in the assault of Port Hudson June 
14, and occupied afterward an advanced position in the trenches until the surrender, leaving its place on the 20th to 
take part in a day's foraging expedition to Jackson Cross Roads. It was the first regiment to return to Massachusetts 
by way of the Mississippi River, and, reaching Greenfield August 3, was mustered out of service Aug. 14, 1863. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



295 



Fifty-second Kegiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 





3 

to 

•d 

a 

2 

S 


1 

3 


Companies. 


CO 

Is 

CC cp 
'to — 

CO 

s 

C 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


3 

o 
Eh 


Killed and died of wounds, — 






7 
7 


1 


1 


1 


3 


2 








2 




1 

10 


Totals, . . . ' . 


- 


1 


11 
12 


9 
10 


17 
18 


8 
11 


11 
13 


6. 

6 


10 
10 


9 
9 


11 
13 


- 


11 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


99 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 




Total losses, — 

Officers, 


1 

109 


Totals, 


























1 


110 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1863. 

June 14-16, Port Hudson, La., 
June 22-24, Port Hudson, La., 
July 6, Port Hudson, La., 



- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


2 
1 


1 
1 


- 


- 


- 


1 
1 


- 



296 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fifty-third Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 
Col. John "W. Kimball, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





S 

CO 

13 

S3 

s 

5 

£ 


<v 
a 

3 


Companies. 


CO 

8 g 
a 






A 
92 


B 


C 


D E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


9 
6 


35 


88 


71 


94 


91 


92 


89 


79 


77 


87 




44 
866 


Totals, 

Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


- 


- 


4 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


910 

7 
1 


Totals, 


9 
6 


35 


4 

88 


88 


1 
70 


1 
93 


91 


1 
91 


89 


79 


1 
76 


87 




8 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


44 
858 


Totals, 




























902 



Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 53d Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, was composed of men from the towns of northern Worcester and 
Middlesex counties. Organized at Camp Stevens, Groton Junction, and mustered during the latter part of October 
and November, 1862, it left the State November 29, under Lieutenant-Colonel Barrett, to join the Banks expedition. 
John W. Kimball, lieutenant-colonel of the 15th Mass. Infantry, was appointed colonel, and assumed command 
November 29, rejoining the regiment at New York on December 9. Sailing for Louisiana Jan. 18, 1863, the regiment 
reached Carrollton the 31st, and was assigned to Colonel Gooding's Brigade, General Emory's Division, 19th Corps. 
It moved to Baton Rouge in March, took part in a reconnoissance up the Bayou Sara road March 12, and joined in 
the movement to Port Hudson on the 14th. It engaged in the Teche expedition, and was active at Fort Bisland 
April 13, where, holding the most advanced position, it was first to enter the fort on the morning of the 14th. 
Remaining behind at Simmsport for a day on guard 'duty on the return from Alexandria, the regiment rejoined its 
brigade before Port Hudson May 23. Soon after its arrival it was detailed as guard to the engineer corps. It took 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



297 



Fifty-third Regiment Massachusetts 


Infantry 


f Militia). 








S 
2 

E 


S 

3 


Companies. 


Unassigned 
Recruits. 






A 

4 


B 


c 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


s 

o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


- 


5 


- 


.2 


5 


1 
18 

19 


8 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


5 
23 




- 


5 


10 
14 


10 
10 


11 
13 


13 
18 


13 

21 


22 
22 


21 
21 


8 
11 


14 
14 


- 


28 


Died by accident or disease, — 
Enlisted men, .... 


140 


Died as prisoners, — 
Enlisted men, . 




Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


5 
163 






























168 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1803. 

April 13, Bisland, La., . 
May 25, Port Hudson, La., 
June 2, Port Hudson, La., 
June 14, Port Hudson, La., 





1 


1 










1 






1 






- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 
4 


- 


1 
1 
5 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


2 


1 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 



4 

2 

2 

20 



active part in the assault of May 27, shared in the expedition to Clinton June 5-8, and, forming part of the storming 
column in the assault of June 14, lost heavily on that clay. Serving for two days on picket duty in the vicinity of 
Port Hudson after the surrender, it moved then to Baton Rouge and on the 15th to Donaldsonville, near which it 
remained in camp until AugUBt 2, returning then to Baton Rouge. Co. B, detached April 8, 1863, aud Co. K, March 
10, served as division and corps pioneers, taking part in the Teche expedition and the siege of Port Iludson. Co. 
B rejoined the regiment at Donaldsonville July 16, and Co. K at Baton Rouge August 3. On August 12 the com- 
mand left for Massachusetts, going by way of Cairo, 111., and, reaching Fitchburg, Mass., on the 24th, was mustered 
out at Camp Stevens Sept. 2, 1863. 



298 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fifty-fourth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Robert G. Shaw. (2) Col. Edward N. Hallo-well, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





03 

CO 

•O 

r. 
03 


cy 
c 

3 


Companies. 


CO 

SK 

co — 

to 

03 

a 






A 


B 


C 


D 


B 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


16 
5 


62 


130 


132 


115 


136 


116 


118 


126 


127 


130 


124 


no 
no 


78 

1,369 


Totals, 


16 

5 


62 


130 


1 

131 


115 


1 

135 


116 


2 
116 


126 


1 

126 


130 


124 


1,447 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 

Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


5 

78 
1,364 


Totals, 


























1,442 



Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 54th Mass. Infantry was the first regiment of colored men raised in the Northern States east of the Mississippi 
River. Authority for recruiting such a regiment was given Governor Andrew by the Secretary of War in an order 
dated Jan. 26, 1863. Capt. Robert G. Shaw of the 2d Mass. Infantry was placed in charge of the regiment during 
its formation, and was commissioned colonel April 17. All the commissioned officers except the chaplain were 
white until the muster of Lieut. S. A. Swails, May 14, 1864. Recruiting began in Boston on February 9; men were 
also sent from Philadelphia, but the larger part of the members were obtained through the efforts of a recruiting 
committee appointed by Governor Andrew, which drew its recruits from stations established from Boston to St. 
Louis, largely under the direction of Maj. G. L. Stearns. Four companies having been mustered into service at 
Readville, March 30, three on April 23 and the remaining three May 13, the regiment left the State May 28, 1863, to 
join General Hunter's forces in the Department of the South. Reaching Hilton Head, S. C, June 3, it was ordered 
to Beaufort and afterward to St. Simon's Island, Ga., forming part of a brigade under Colonel Montgomery of the 
2d S. C. Regiment. Returning to Hilton Head June 25, it was ordered to James Island in July, and took part in the 
action at Secessionville July 16. Reaching Morris Island at 6 o'clock on the evening of the 18th, it led that night 
the assault on Fort Wagner, planting its colors on the parapet, where Colonel Shaw fell at the head of the storming 
column, and the remnant of the regiment, under Captain Emilio (all of the field and many of the line officers being 
killed or wounded), were repulsed, but remained in an advanced position after the charge until relieved on the 
morning of the 19th. It served in the trencheB during the siege and in strengthening the works after the surrender 
until January, 1864, when it formed part of the expedition to Florida under General Seymour, and took part with 
loss in the battle of Olustee, February 20. Returning to Morris Island April 18, it remained there during the 
summer and autumn. Eight companies, under Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, forming part of the Coast Division, 
moved to Hilton Head in November, and engaged at Honey Hill and were in reserve at Deveaux Neck. It moved to 
Graham's Neck December 19 and to Pocotaligo in January, and, entering Charleston February 27, met there its two 
companies left behind at MorriB Island. The regiment took part in an expedition into central South Carolina 
in April, 1865, meeting the enemy at Boykin's Mills on the 18th. Returning to Charleston in the early part of May, 
it served by detachments on guard and garrison duty in various parts of the State. It was mustered out of service 
August 20, at Mount Pleasant, and, reaching Boston by detachments on the 26th and 28th, was discharged at Gallop's 
Island Sept. 1, and disbanded on Boston Common Sept. 2, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



299 



Fifty-fourth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 










id 

OB 

■o 
5 
2 


a 

3 


Companies. 


L — 
UJ — 

5 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


GO 

o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 


4 


12 


5 


8 


12 


3 


10 


7 


10 


6 


15 




5 
88 


Totals, ..... 






10 
11 

2 
35 


7 
5 


7 
6 


12 


5 
14 


12 


7 
4 


10 


1 
14 


6 
12 


6 
6 


93 




43 


Died by accident or disease, — 
Enlisted men, .... 


1 
106 


Totals, 


1 


5 


7 
24 


2 
23 


1 
25 


3 
25 


2 
24 


1 

19 


4 
24 


1 
22 


11 

44 


107 


Died as prisoners, 2 — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


34 


Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


6 

271 
























277 



2 Including 2 in Co. F. and 11 in Co. K missing, supposed died in prison. 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1803. 

July 1G, James Island, S. C, 
July IS, Fort Wdgner, S. C, 
Sept. 1-5, Fort Wagner trenches, 

S. C. 
Oct. P, Fort Wagner trenches, 

S. C. 



1864. 

Feb 20, Olustee, Fla., . 

July 2, Secession ville, S. C, 

Jn',7 15, Morris Island, S. C, 

NcV. 30, Honey Hill, S. C, . 



1865. 

April 16, Camden, S..C, 
Apiil 18, Boykin's Mills, S. C, 



1 


2 

1 
1 


19 
2 

1 


1 
9 

2 


10 

2 
1 

2 


11 
1 


8 


8 
2 


12 
2 


6 
2 
1 

1 


5 
1 

1 


4 
9 
1 

6 
1 


- 



11 

96 3 
4 



12 
1 
2 
3 



2 
4 



Including those raissingiu action. 



300 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fifty-fifth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 
(1) Col. Norwood P. Hallowell. (2) Col. Alfred S. Hart-well, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





•2 

00 

a 

a 

H 
E 


6 
c 


Companies 


OS 

tag 

CO ~* 

5 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


m 

o 

Eh 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


12 
8 


70 


121 


119 


107 


113 

2 
2 


101 


125 


107 


102 


116 


113 
1 


12 


82 
1,144 


Totals, 


4 


- 


- 


3 


_ 


_ 


1 
1 


_ 


1 


- 


: 


1,226 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


8 

7 


Totals 


4 

12 

4 


70 


121 


3 
116 


107 


4 
109 


101 


2 
123 


107 


1 
101 


116 


1 
112 


12 


15 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


82 
1,129 


Totals, 






















1,211 



1 Including noD-commisaioned staff. 



The 55th Mass. Infantry, composed, like the 54th, of colored enlisted men with white officers, was organized at 
Readville in the spring of 1863; the recruiting committee which supplied most of the men of the 54th filling the 
ranks of this regiment also. The first recruits arrived at camp May 12 and the first five companies were mustered 
into service May 31, two more on June 15 and the remaining three on the 22d. Under command of Col. Norwood P. 
Hallowell, the regiment left the camp July 21 and embarked for New Berne, arriving on the 25th. It was ordered 
to Charleston harbor on the 29th, became part of General Wild's Brigade, 10th Army Corps, and served in the 
operations agaiDst Charleston for the remainder of the year. In February, 1864, the regiment, under Col. A. S. 
Hartwell (Colonel Hallowell having resigned in November from the effect of injuries received at Antietam), was 
sent to join the forces at Jacksonville, Fla., and served by detachments at Yellow Bluff, at the forts near Jacksonville 
and at Palatka. Returning to Charleston harbor April 18-20, it took part in the movement against Charleston July 
2, capturing two of the enemy's guns and losing nine men killed and mortally wounded. Eight companies were sent 
to Hilton Head, 8 C, in November, forming part of a brigade under Colonel Hartwell, Coast Divi6nn. It lost 
heavily at the battle of Honey Hill, where, Colonel Hartwell being wounded, the command of the reg.ment was 
taken by Lieutenant-Colonel Fox. It occupied a position at Boyd's Neck until ordered to Savaunah, Ga., in 
January, 1865. Returning to Hilton Head February 1, it entered Charleston February 20, and shared in an expedi- 
tion into the interior of South Carolina from February 22 to March 10. Moviug, April 19, to Orangeburg, it -served 
by detachments in the vicinity during the remainder of its term of service, and was mustered out at Mount Pleasant 
Aug. 29, 1865. It was finally paid off and discharged at Gallop's Island, Boston harbor, Sept. 23, and disbanded Bept. 
25, 1865. i 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



301 





Fifty-fifth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry 


• 












m 

a 

<n 

T3 
C 
03 

H 

5 


c 

3 


Companies. 


oi 

"Si 

C 







A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


GO 

"5 
o 
H 


Killed and died of 
Enlisted men, 


wounds, — 
• disease, — 

• • • 

• * • • 

• • ■ • 

• • • • 

• • • • 






7 
12 


14 


6 


12 


1 


7 


3 




5 


4 





3 

59 






2 


17 


9 


3 


12 


14 


16 


7 


15 


13 


62 


Died by accident cm 
Officers, 
Enlisted men, 


2 
118 


Totals, . 






19 


31 


15 


15 


13 


22 


19 


7 


20 


17 


120 


Died as prisoners, - 
Officers, 
Enlisted men, 


1 


Total losses, — 
Officers, 
Enlisted men, 


5 
178 


Totals, . 




























183 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1864. 

July 2, James Island, S. C, 
July 4, Picket, James Island, S. C, 
Nov. 30, Honey Hill, S. C, . 
Dec. 9, Deveaux Neck, S. C, 
Place unknown, 



1865. 

Marc 1 ! 1, Picket, St. Stephens, S. C, 



- 


2 
1 


1 
6 


1 
13 


4 
2 


12 


1 


7 


1 
1 

1 


- 


2 
3 


3 
1 


- 



11 
1 

47 
1 
1 



302 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fifty-sixth Eegiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Col. Charles E. Giuswold. (2) Col. Stephen M. Weld, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





is 
a 

09 

a 

03 

S 
5 


oi 
C 

3 


Companies. 


en 

c *- 

03 

5 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


m 

o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


9 
11 


65 


131 


122 


114 


118 


111 


116 


92 


110 


103 


89 


2 


74 
1,119 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


5 


- 




1 


2 
5 


1 


1 

4 


1 


- 


2 


2 


1 


- 


1,193 

16 

9 


Totals, 


5 

9 

6 


65 


131 


1 
121 


7 
107 


1 
117 


5 
106 


1 
115 


92 


2 

108 


2 

101 


1 
88 


2 


25 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


74 
1,094 


Totals 
















" 








- 


1,168 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 66th Mass. Infantry was the first of the four veteran regiments which were organized at Readville, Mass., in 
the autumn and winter of 1863-64, and was composed of men who had already served in some other organization 
for at least nine months. The regiment under Col. Charles E. Griswold left camp for Annapolis, Md., March 20, 
1864, and became part of Colonel Carruth's Brigade, General Stevenson's Division, 9th Army Corps. It left the 
camp at Annapolis April 23 to take part in the spring campaign, and was closely engaged at the Wilderness near the 
junction of Brock and Plank roads on the morning of May 6, Colonel Griswold being killed in the action. Taking 
part in the movements of the campaign, the regiment shared with the 9th Corps in support of General Hancock's 
attack at Spotsylvania Court House May 12, taking part also in the assault on the 18th; and, crossing North Anna 
River May 24, as part of General Ledlie's Brigade, met the enemy near Ox Ford. It was engaged at Bethesda 
Church May 31 and at Cold Harbor June 3; participated in the movements of the following dayB, and, crossing the 
James with the army to the front of Petersburg, took active part in the assault of June 17 and joined in the Biege 
operations. 

It shared with the 9th Corps in the action at the Crater July 30, forming part of the division selected to lead the 
advance immediately after the explosion of the mine, losing many as prisoners, in addition to those killed and 
wounded. It took part in the movement against the Weldon Railroad in August, sharing in the engagement of 
August 19, and was present at the battle of Peebles' Farm, or Poplar Spring Church, September 30. Participating in 
all the duties of the siege during the autumn and winter, it took active part in the assault of April 1, 1865, when, 
located near the Jerusalem Plank Road.it held with the 5th Mass. Battery an important position throughout the 
day in the line of Confederate works. Encamping at Burkesville after the fall of Petersburg, it moved after Lee's 
surrender to Alexandria and was stationed there during the remainder of its service. It was mustered out July 12 
and paid off and discharged at Readville, Mass., July 22, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



303 



Fifty-sixth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 





-4-» 

<n 

•a 
tt 
a 

"a; 
fa 


c 
3 


Companies. 


00 

If 

bio qj 

55 02 

en 

as 

c 






• 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


BO 

"3 

O 

H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 


5 


11 


6 


14 


12 


8 


12 


7 


9 


14 


6 




6 
99 


Totals, 


1 

1 

1 


5 


2 

1 

14 


5 

3 

14 


2 

5 

21 


8 

4 

24 


1 

6 

4 

19 


2 

6 

4 

24 


8 

6 

21 


7 

7 

23 


1 

3 

9 

27 


4 

5 

15 


- 


105 
4 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


52 


Died as prisoners, 2 — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


48 


/ 

Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


6 
203 


Totals, 


























209 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



2 Including 2 in Co. C, supposed died in prison. 



Casualties by Engagements. 



May 3-12, 
May 10-21, 
May 24, 
May 31, 
June 3, 

June 17-18, 
June 23-27, 
July 6-13, 
July 30, 
Aug. 11-19, 
Aug. 21, 
Sept. 30, 



1864. 

Wilderness, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
North Anna River, Va. 
Bethesda Church, Va., 
Shady Grove Church, 

Va. 
Petersburg, Va., 
Before Petersburg, Va 
Before Petersburg, Va 
Petersburg, Va. (Crater) 
Before Petersburg, Va 
Weldon .Railroad, Va. 
Peebles' Farm, Va., 
Place unknown, . 



1865. 

April 2, Hatcher's Run, Va. 





1 




7 


3 


1 


4 




3 


2 


1 


1 


1 






_ 


_ 


1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


2 


1 


2 


1 


3 


— 




- 


1 


1 


- 


2 


2 


1 


- 


1 


- 


2 


1 


_ 




— 


1 


1 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


_ 


, 


- 


1 


























- 


1 


- 


1 


5 


1 


2 


2 


- 


- 


2 
2 
1 
1 


1 


- 


r), 


- 


_ 


_ 


— 


2 


3 


2 


- 


3 


- 


- 








1 






1 




1 


1 


1 


1 








- 


- 


— 


1 


1 


2 


— 


4 


— 


2 


2 


t 


— 


• 


- 


1 


- 


" 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 



24 
18 
11 

4 

1 

13 
3 
2 

11 
4 
1 
1 

12 



304 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fifty-seventh Begiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 

(1) Col. William F. Bartlett, Bvt. Maj. Gen. U. S. Vols. 

(2) Col. Napoleon B. McLaughlen, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Army. 





fa 

S3 

+j 

CO 

■a 
3 

2 


C 

3 


Companies. 


P 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


3 

O 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men,' .... 


17 
10 


59 


155 


138 


129 


129 

2 
1 


128 


129 


140 


140 


143 


127 
1 


3 


76 
1,371 


Totals, 

Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. i 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


2 


- 


1 


1 
1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


3 


- 


1,447 
11 

7 


Totals, 


2 

17 
8 


59 


1 
154 


2 
136 


129 


3 

126 


1 
127 


1 

128 


1 
139 


3 
137 


3 

140 


1 

126 


3 


18 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


76 
1,353 


Totals, . ~ . 




























1,429 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 57th Mass. Infantry, second of the four veteran regiments, was organized in the autumn and winter of 
1863-64 by Col. William F. Bartlett of the 49th Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, who became colonel of this 
regiment and afterwards brevet major-general U. S. Volunteers. It was recruited largely in Worcester, Hampden 
and Berkshire counties, and nearly all of the officers had seen active service in other organizations. Co. A was 
mustered into service Jan. 4, 1864, and the remaining companies before the 6th of April. The regiment left the 
State April 18, 1864, and, encamping at Annapolis, Md., was assigned to the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 9th CorpB, 
and, moving at once to the front, encamped a$ the Rappahannock. Moving through Brandy Station and Germania 
Ford, it engaged on the morning of May 6 at the battle of the Wilderness with great loss. Colonel Bartlett being 
wounded early in the engagement, the command was assumed by Lieutenant-Colonel Chandler. Moving to Spotsyl- 
vania Court House, the regiment took part in a reconnoissance on May 10, when its division commander, General 
Stevenson, was killed. As part of the Ninth Corps, it supported General Hancock in the charge made by his corps 
at Spotsylvania Court House early in the morning of May 12, and held an advanced position during the day and 
until May 18, taking part on that day in a reconnoissance on the enemy's position. At the North Anna River, 
May 24, the regiment suffered heavily, and Lieutenant-Colonel Chandler was mortally wounded, dying in the hands 
of the enemy a few hours after the engagement. It engaged in action at Cold Harbor June 3, and, crossing the 
James River June 15, took part in the assault of Petersburg June 17, under Capt. J. M. Tucker, who was wounded. 
As part of the 1st Division, 9th Corps, the regiment led in the assault at the Crater, July 30. It engaged at the 
Weldon Railroad in August, at Peebles' Farm in September and at the Weldon Railroad again in February, 1865, 
and in the final operations about Petersburg. It entered the city after its fall and encamped in the vicinity, moving 
afterward to the Southside Railroad. After Lee's surrender It moved toward Washington and encamped near 
Tenallytown. On June 20 the 57th and 59th regiments were consolidated as the 57th Infantry, to take effect from 
June 1. It was mustered out of service July 30, 1865, and, reaching Readville, Mass., August 3, was paid off and 
discharged Aug. 9, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



305 



Fifty-seventh Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 





*5 
31 

en 

■a 

c 

OS 

2 
E 


C 

3 


Companies. 


i! 

bug 
IS 6 * 

03 

5 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


m 

"3 

+3 

O 

f 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Officers, . ' . 
Enlisted men, .... 


3 


8 


23 


11 


15 


18 


17 
2 
1 
2 

22 


10 


18 


20 


16 


17 




11 

165 




3 


8 


3 

4 

6 

36 


5 
6 
5 

27 


1 

3 

19 


1 

5 

6 

30 


6 

6 

1 

23 


8 

2 

28 


1 

5 

6 

32 


5 

8 

1 

30 


8 

2 

27 


176 


Missing, 


23 


Died by accident or disease, — 
Officers, . . . 
Enlisted men, .... 


52 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


34 


Total losses, — 

Officers, . . . 
Enlisted men, . . . 


11 

274 






























285 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1864. 

May 6, Wilderness, Va., . * 
May 12-18, Spotsylvania, Va., 
May 24, North Anna River, Va., 
June 1, Cold Harbor, Va., 
June 17-22, Petersburg, Va., . 
July 5-19, Before Petersburg, Va., 
July 30, Petersburg, Va (Crater), 
Aug. 3, Before Petersburg, Va., 
Aug. 18-19, Weldon Railroad, Va., 
Sept. 30, Poplar Spring Church 
or Peebles' Farm, Va. 
Oct. 8, Petersburg, Va., . 

Place unknown, . 



1865. 

March 25, Petersburg or Fort Sted- 
man, Va. 
Place unknown, . 



• 

1 

1 

1 


2 

2 
2 

2 


11 
5 

4 

1 
1 

2 

2 


7 
1 
2 

3 

2 

1 


7 
5 

2 
1 


12 
3 
3 

1 


12 
1 
2 

1 
1 

1 
1 


8 
2 

1 
1 
1 

1 
2 


10 

1 
1 
1 

4 
1 


9 
5 
2 

2 

1 

2 


10 
4 
3 

1 

1 

2 


3 
3 

4 

1 

5 
1 


- 



91 

29 

14 

1 

17 
3 
11 
1 
3 
1 

2 
14 



10 

2 



306 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Fifty-eighth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

Lieut.-Col. John C. Whiton, Bvt Col. U. S. Vols. 





at 

•a 

a 

09 

s 

E 


a3 

c 

3 


Companies. 


CO 

*- u 

en*-* 

a 

e 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


10 


53 


101 


95 


100 


95 


104 


82 


91 


92 


79 


108 


6 


63 

953 




10 


53 


3 
98 


1 

94 


1 

99 


2 
93 


3 
101 


82 


2 
89 


3 
89 


79 


108 


6 


1016 


Enlisted men (included above) com- 
missioned in regiment. 

Enlisted men (included above) serv- 
ing elsewhere within regiment. 


15 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


63 

938 






























1001 



The 58th Mass. Infantry (Third Veteran Regiment) was the last three years' infantry organization from Massa- 
chusetts to be mustered into the United States service and to leave the State for the front. Although recruiting for 
the regiment began in September, 1863, only eight companies were filled and mustered when the command left the 
State on April 28, 1864. Col. Silas P. Richmond of the 3d Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, was commissioned 
colonel of the regiment Sept. 28, 1863, but, resigning before muster, the organization was under command of Lieut.- 
Col. John C. Whiton during its entire service. It reached Alexandria Apiil 30, moving May 2 to Bristoe Station, 
where it was assigned to the 1st Brigade, 2d Division, 9th Corps. It was engaged on the afternoon of May 6 at the 
Wilderness, and, moving to Spotsylvania, took part in the assault of May 12 and in frequent skirmishes during the 
succeeding days. It shared in the movements to the North Anna and Totopotomoy rivers, and, reaching Cold Har- 
bor, joined in the assault on June 3, holding an advanced position during the day, with heavy loss. While located in 
front of Cold Harbor, Co. I joined the regiment from Massachusetts. Moving with the army to Petersburg, the com- 
mand took part in the assault of June 17 and in the movement at the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad on the next day. 
As part of the 9th Corps it shared in the advance into the Crater after the explosion of the mine, July 30, losing three 
officers and eighty-one men taken prisoners, besides those killed and mortally wounded. At the battle of Poplar 
Spring Church, Sept. 30, 1864, all but one officer and about ten men of those engaged were made prisoners. Gaining a 
few men by those returning from detached service and by recruits, the command was placed at Hancock Station, and 
shared in picket and fatigue duty during the remainder of the year. In February, 1865, Co. K arrived from Massa- 
chusetts. The regiment took part in the assault of Petersburg April 2, and after its fall was stationed at Burkes- 
ville and Farmville. Returning, it reached Alexandria April 28, and encamped in the vicinity until the expiration of 
its term of service. Reaching Readville, Mass., July 18, it was paid off and discharged July 26, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



307 



Fifty-eighth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry- 


i 






' 




*5 
S 

w 

■a 
c 

OS 

■a 

E 


0J 

c 

3 


Companies. 


O) p 

so 
B 
C 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


CO 

3 

o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 


9 


15 
1 
9 


10 
1 
6 


10 

3 

10 


13 


9 


8 


16 


7 


10 


1 
4 




10 
99 


Totals, 






2 
4 


2 

14 


7 


8 


2 
9 


3 
5 


- 


109 




14 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 
76 


Totals, 


- 


1 


9 


12 


10 


8 


6 


9 


13 


12 


5 




77 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 
84 


Totals, 

Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 


11 


34 


29 


33 


27 


31 


24 


37 


30 


23 


5 




85 

12 

273 












" 
















285 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1864. 

May 6, Wilderness, Va., . 
May 11-21, Spotsylvania, Va , 
June 2-10, Cold Harbor, Va., 
June 15-21, Petersburg, Va., . 
June 23-26, Before Petersburg, Va., 
July 4, Picket near Petersburg, 

Va. 
July 12, Petersburg, Va., . 
July 30, Petersburg, Va.( Crater), 
Sept. 30, Poplar Spring Church, 

Va. 
Dec. 1, Before Petersburg, Va., 

Place unknown, . 

1865. 

Jan. 7, Before Petersburg, Va., 

April 2, Petersburg, Va., . 







1 


1 




1 


1 


2 


1 










- 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 


1 


- 


5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


3 


8 


3 


2 


5 


3 


2 


4 


3 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


2 


- 


1 


2 


2 


1 


- 


1 


2 


— 


_ 




1 














1 


1 


3 






— 


1 


- 


_ 


2 


2 


3 


2 


1 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 




2 






3 


1 






1 






" 


*~ 






1 
1 


3 










3 


2 


4 






— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


1 


1 


~ 


— 


— 


— 


1 


- 



7 

19 

34 

11 

5 

1 

1 
13 

7 

1 
13 



308 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



I 
Fifty-ninth Eegiment Massachusetts Infantry. 

Col. Jacob P. Gould. 



» 


« 

M 

2 
E 


3 


Companies. 


B3 

■8*3 
a 3 

5 

C 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


03 
O 

E- 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


11 

7 


45 


87 


96 


101 


85 


84 


83 


95 


91 


78 


98 


1 


56 

906 


Totals, 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 

1 


2 


1 


- 


2 


2 
1 


1 


98 


- 


962 


Enlisted men (included above) com- 
missioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) serv- 
ing elsewhere within regiment. 


9 

4 


Totals, 


1 

11 
6 


45 


1 

86 


96 


2 
99 


2 
83 


1 

83 


83 


2 
93 


3 

88 


1 

77 


1 


13 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


56 
893 


Totals, 












949 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 59th Mass. Infantry (Fourth Veteran Regiment) was recruited and organized at Readville with the other 
veteran regiments in the winter of 1863-64, and, completing the organization of its ten companies, it left the State 
April 26, two days in advance of the 58th Infantry. Reaching Washington, it moved through Bealton and Rappa- 
hannock stations to Germania Ford, and, assigned to the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 9th Corps, engaged in the battle 
of the Wilderness ten days after leaving the State. Under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Hodges (Colonel Gould 
being in charge of the brigade), the regiment took part in the charge at Spotsylvania Court House May 12. It 
shared in the action and loss of its division at the North Anna River May 24, in the movement to Cold Harbor and 
in the assault of June 3. At Petersburg, June 17, it made a successful assault upon the enemy's works, though 
suffering loss. Its brigade led the advance into the Crater July 30 and the regiment lost in the action its two highest 
officers, as Colouel Gould in command of a brigade was wounded, from the effects of which he died August 22, and 
Lieutenant-Colonel Hodges, in command of the regiment, was killed. It was engaged in the movement against the 
Weldon Railroad in August and in the battle of Peebles' Farm, or Poplar Spring Church, September 30. Taking 
part in the siege during the autumn and winter, the regiment, under command of Major Gould, took active part 
at Fort Stedman, March 25, and, passing through Petersburg after the surrender, encamped in the vicinity for a 
few days and was stationed afterward on guard duty at the Southside Railroad. It was ordered to Washington in 
the latter part of April, and encamped at Tenallytown during the remainder of its service. On June 20 the regiment 
was consolidated with the 57th Mass. Infantry, to take effect from June 1, and wbb mustered out with that organiza- 
tion July 30, being discharged at Readville, Mass., Aug. 9, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



309 



Fifty-ninth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 





*3 

•a 
c 
a 

2 
5 


CO 

13 


Companies. 


00 

<V S3 

3 

n 
& 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


P 


G 


H 


I 


K 


09 

"3 

■a 
o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 
Enlisted men, . 


2 


6 


8 
2 
1 
1 
12 


3 


11 


8 


5 


7 


6 


5 


8 


5 


- 


8 
66 


Totals, 


2 


6 


1 

4 

7 

15 


4 

5 

20 


2 

6 

2 

18 


4 

6 

15 


2 

6 

15 


2 
10 

3 
21 


5 
3 

13 


3 

2 

2 

15 


1 

7 

4 

17 


74 




11 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 

Died as prisoners, — 

Enlisted men, .... 

Total losses, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


45 

39 

8 
161 


Totals, 






















169 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1864. 

May 6, Wilderness, Va , . 
May 8-18, Spotsylvania, Va., 
May 24, North Anna River, Va., 
June 3, Cold Harbor, Va., 
June 17, Petersburg, Va., . 
June29-July 9, Before Petersburg, 

Va. 
July 30, Petersburg, Va. (Crater), 
Aug. 19, Weldon Railroad, Va., 
Sept. 30, Poplar Spring Church, 

Va. 

Oct. 15, Petersburg, Va., . 
Place unknown, . 

1865. 

Jan. 12-Feb. 27, Petersburg, Va., . 
March 25, Fort Stedman, Va., 


2 


1 
1 

1 

1 
1 


1 
4 

1 
1 

3 


1 
2 

1 


1 

4 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 


2 

1 

5 

1 
1 


1 

3 
1 


1 

3 
1 

1 

1 


1 
3 

™ t 

1 
2 

1 


1 
1 

3 


3 
1 
1 
1 

2 

2 
1 


2 
1 

2 

1 


- 


10 

16 

4 

3 

20 

4 

17 

1 
2 

1 
1 
3 

2 

1 



./ 



310 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Sixtieth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 
Col. Ansel D. Wass, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





S3 . 

BO 

■a 
c 

03 

2 

a> 


c 
3 


Companies. 


0) g 

<s 

a 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


"3 
O 


Number on regimental rolls, — 
Enlisted men, 1 .... 


7 
5 


29 


92 


82 


97 


86 


83 


87 
87 


98 


85 


94 


85 




36 

894 


Totals, 


7 
5 


29 


92 


1 
81 


97 


86 


83 


98 


85 


94 


2 
83 


- 


930 


Enlisted men (included above) com- 
missioned in regiment. 

Enlisted men (included above) serv- 
ing elsewhere within regiment. 

Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


3 


36 

891 


Totals, 




























927 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



311 



Sixtieth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia) 










« 

00 

a 

2 


C 

5 


Companies. 


00 

is* 

c 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


"5 
o 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Enlisted men 

Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


- 




10 


Died as prisoners, — 





The 60th Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, -was mustered into service from July 14 to 23, 1864, at Readville, 
Mass., for a term of one hundred days. It left the State August 1, under Lieutenant-Colonel Woodward, Col. 
Ansel D. Wass, late of the 19th Mass. Infantry, taking command at Baltimore, Md. Remaining in camp at Relay 
House and Carroll Hill for two weeks, it was ordered to Indianapolis, Ind., where it spent the remainder of its 
service on guard duty. It was mustered out Nov. 30, 1864. 



312 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Sixty-first Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 
Col. Charles F. "Walcott, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





Ha 
S 

CO 

•o 

C 

a 


C 

3 


Companies. 


GO 

■gg 

5,3 

CO 

s 
£ 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


DQ 

o 
H 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men,' .... 


5 

7 


36 


92 


96 


98 


97 


100 


98 


99 


91 


98 


98 


3 


41 
977 




1 


- 


- 


3 


- 


2 


1 


2 


1 
1 


- 


- 


98 


1,018 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 1 

Enlisted men (included above) 
serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 


5 
6 


Totals, 


1 

5 
6 


36 


92 


3 

93 


98 


2 
95 


1 
99 


2 
96 


2 
97 


91 


98 


3 


11 


Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, 1 .... 


41 
966 






























1,007 



1 Including non-commissioned staff. 



The 61st Mass. Infantry, the last regiment to leave the State, was recruited for one year's service at Gallop's 
Island, Boston harbor, during the autumn and winter of 1864-65. Five companies, forming a battalion under com- 
mand of Lieut. -Col. Charles F. Walcott, left the State October 7 for City Point, Va., and were assigned to the 
Engineer Brigade, under General Benham. The regiment was ordered to the front of Petersburg for two days in 
December and for a week during the movement to Hatcher's Run in February, 1865. Co. F. joined the command 
before the close of the previous year; Co. G, Jan. 5, 1865; Co. H, February 15; and Cos. I and K, on March 15. Ou 
March 17 the command was transferred to the Independent Brigade under Col. E. H. T. Collis. Acting in support 
of the 9th Corps in the attack at Fort Sedgwick, April 2, the regiment charged and captured Fort Mahone and held 
it until the line of works was evacuated by the enemy. Following in pursuit of the enemy until Lee's surrender, it 
returned to City Point in charge of several thousand prisoners, and, moving to Burkesville, was assigned to the 5th 
Army Corps, returning to the vicinity of Washington May 12. On June 5 Cos. A, B, C, D and E left the regiment 
for Massachusetts and were discharged at Readville June 17. The remaining companies, as the 61st Battalion, 
Provisional Corps, occupied the defences of Washington until their return to Massachusetts, July 22, where they 
were mustered out of service Aug. 1, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



313 



Sixty-first 


Regiment Massachusetts Infantry 


• 










3 

•a 
a 

a 

E 


c 

5 


Companies 


as 

93 

c 






A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


m 

"3 
o 
H 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Enlisted men, .... 












1 


3 






1 








1 

5 




- 




2 
2 


1 

1 


- 


1 
2 


2 
5 


3 
3 


2 
2 


3 

4 


2 

2 


1 
1 


- 


6 


Died by accident or disease, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


17 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 




Total losses, — 


1 
22 


Totals 




























23 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1865. 

April 2-3, Fall of Petersburg, Va., 



-1---13--1-- 



314 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Sixty-second Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. 
Col. Ansel D. Wass (not mustered), Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. 





is 
S 

00 

a 

a 

E 


c 

5 


Companies. 


2 2 

B« 

ad 

a 






A 


B 


C 


D 


3 

o 


Number on regimental rolls, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 


8 


98 


98 


94 


98 


8 


9 
396 


Totals, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


405 


Enlisted men (included above) 
commissioned in regiment. 


- 


Enlisted men (included above) 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


serving elsewhere within regi- 
ment. 




Actual total of members of regi- 
ment, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


1 


8 


98 


98 


94 


98 


8 


9 

396 


Totals, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


405 


Killed and died of wounds, — 

Officers, 

Enlisted men, .... 


- 


Died by accident or disease, — 
Officers, ..... 
Enlisted men, .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


Died as prisoners, — 

Officers 

Enlisted men, .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 



The 62d Mass. Infantry was in process of formation at Readville, Mass., when news of the surrender of General 
Lee's army was received. Ansel D. Wass, late colonel of the 60th Infantry, had been selected to command the regi- 
ment, though not mustered. Four companies had been mustered into service and remained in camp until mustered 
out, May 5, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



315 



First Company Sharpshooters Massachusetts Infantry. 
(1) Capt. John Saunders. (2) Capt. "William Plumer. (3) Capt. Isaac N. Mudgett. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 


11 
11 


257 

7 
250 


268 

7 
261 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Missing, .... 

Died by accident or disease, 

Died as prisoners, 
Totals,. 


3 


16 
2 

16 
3 


19 
2 

16 
3 


company, 


3 


37 


40 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1863. 

Sept. 17, Antietam, Md,, . 

1863. 

July 2-3, Gettysburg, Pa , 

1864. 

May 12, Wilderness, Va., 



2 


8 


10 


- 


3 


3 


- 


1 


1 



May 18, Spotsylvania, Va.. 
May 31, Jones Farm, Va., 
June 3, Cold Harbor, Va., 
June 18, Petersburg, Va., 
Sept. 28, Petersburg, Va., 



The let Company Sharpshooters, known as the Andrew Sharpshooters, numbering 98 men, under Capt. John 
Saunders, was organized in camp at Lynnfield, Mass., In August, 1861, and was mustered and left the State Septem- 
ber 3. It was assigned to General Lander's Brigade, located near Poolsville, Md., and met the enemy in a skirmish 
at Edward's Ferry, October 1 and 2. The company remained on the Upper Potomac with General Lander until his 
death in March, 1862, and, after serving for a time under General Shields, was attached to theT5th Mass. Infantry, 
then engaged at the siege of Yorktown, and served with it until the spring of 1863, sharing in the peninsular cam- 
paign, and losing heavily in the charge at Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862, where Captain Saunders and First Lieutenant 
Berry were killed. Second Lieutenant Martin took command of the company after the battle until the arrival of 
Capt. William Plumer from Massachusetts with forty recruits, Dec. 9, 1882. On April 17, 1863, the company was 
attached to the 2d Division, 2d Corps, and served with it at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. About the 11th of 
August it was ordered to join the 20th Mass. Infantry, and, serving under First Sergeant Gilbreth, took active part 
at the battle of Bristoe Station, October 14, and engaged afterward in the Mine Run Campaign. It served with the 
20th Regiment during the Wilderness Campaign, and lost its commanding officer, Lieutenant Gilbreth, at Peters- 
burg, June 18. Soon afterward those who remained of the company were attached to the 19th Mass. Infantry, and 
were identified with its members until their muster out of service at the close of the war. 



316 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Second Company Sharpshooters Massachusetts Infantry. 

(1) Capt. Lewis E. Wentworth. (2) Capt. Robert Smith. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 

Actual total of members of 
company, 


8 
8 


144 

4 
140 


152 

4 
148 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident or disease, 

Died as prisoners, 
Totals, 


- 


12 
9 
1 


12 
9 
1 


- 


22 


22 



Casualties by Engagements. 



1862. 

Dec. 13, Fredericksburg, 
Va., . 


_ 


1 


1 


May 30, Totopotomoy, 
Va., 


- 


2 


2 


1864. 

May 8, Laurel Hill, Va., . 


- 


4 


4 


June 1-2, Cold Harbor 
(Bethesda Church), 
Va 


- 


2 


2 


May 10, Spotsylvania, Va., 


- 


2 


2 


Place unknown, 


- 


1 


1 



The 2d Company Sharpshooters was organized in Camp at Lynnfield, Mass., in September, 1861, and, under com- 
mand of Capt. Lewis E. Wentworth, left the State October 8, attached to the 22d Mass. Infantry, with which it 
remained during its entire service, its history forming part of the history of that regiment. It took part with the 
22d in the peninsular battles, Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and the Wilderness. It was mustered out Oct. 
17, 186-1, and Uiobk whose term of service had not yet expired were transferred to the 32d Mass. Infantry. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



317 



Third Battalion Riflemen Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 

Ma.j. Charles Devens, Jr. 



fa 

03 



Number on rolls, — 
Officers, . 
Enlisted men, 1 



Totals, 



Enlisted men (included above) commis- 
sioned in battalion. 



Enlisted men (included above) serving else- 
where within battalion. 



Actual total of members of battalion, • 
Officers, . . ... 
Enlisted men, 1 



Totals, 



Killed and died of wounds, 
Officers, . 
Enlisted men, . 



Died by accident or disease, 
Officers, . 
Enlisted men, . 



Died as prisoners, - 
Officers, . 
Enlisted men, 



20 



20 



Companies. 



D 



79 



78 



74 



74 



73 



73 



69 



25 

297 



322 



69 



25 
296 



321 



Including non-commissioned staff. 



The Sd Battalion Riflemen, Mass. Volunteer Militia, under command of Maj. Charles DeveDS, Jr., with head- 
quarters at Worcester, Mass., was ordered to Washington April 20, 1861. It reached Annapolis April 24, moving 
on May 2 to Fort McHenry, Md., and was stationed there as garrison during its three months of service. An addi- 
tional company (D), under Captain Dodd, recruited in Boston, joined the battalion May 19, after spending twelve 
days in Washington, having come from Boston by water, the first organization to arrive at Washington by that 
route. The battalion was mustered into the service of the United States May 19 and mustered out Aug. 3, 1865. 



318 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Unattached Companies of Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 
First Company. — Capt. Lewis J. Bird. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted . 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 
Enlisted men (included 

above) commissioned in 

company, 
Actual total of members of 

company, 


3 
3 


97 
97 


100 
100 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident or dis- 

OclSGj • • • • 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


- 


- 



The 1st Unattached Company Infantry, Maes. Volunteer Militia, from Boston, Mass., was mustered into service 
for ninety days, April 29, 1864. It was stationed at Fort Independence, Boston harbor, and was mustered out Aug. 
1, 1864. 

Second Company. — (1) Capt. Francis E. Porter, 90 days and 100 days. 

(2) Capt. Leonard G-. Dennis, 1 year. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, — 








Killed and died of wounds, - 








90 days, 


3 


88 


91 


90 days, . 


- 


- 


- 


100 days, 


3 


98 


101 


100 days, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 year, 


3 


99 


102 


1 year, . 


- 


- 


- 


Enlisted men (included 
















above) commissioned in 








Died by accident or dis- 








company, — 








ease, — 








90 days, 


- 


- 


- 


90 days, . 


- 


- 


- 


100 days, 


- 


- 


- 


100 days, . . . 


- 


- 


- 


1 year, 


- 


- 


- 


1 year, . 


- 


3 


3 


Actual total of members of 
















company, — 








Died as prisoners, — 








90 days, 


3 


88 


91 


90 days, . 


- 


- 


- 


100 days, 


3 


98 


101 


100 days, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 year, 


3 


99 


102 


1 year, . 


— 


— 


— 



The 2d Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, from Beverly, Mass., was mustered Into service 
for ninety days, May 3, 1864. It served at Eastern Point, Gloucester, until August 6, when its term having expired, 
it re-enlisted and was mustered on the next day (August 7) for one hundred days' service, spending this term also at 
Gloucester. At the close of the one hundred days' service the company re-enlisted for one year, being mustered in 
Nov. 16, 1864. It served at Gallop's Island, Boston harbor, and was mustered out July 7, 1865. 



Third Company. — Capt. Luther Dame. 



>• 


Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 
Enlisted men (included 

above) commissioned in 

company, 
Actual total of members of 

company, 


3 
3 


84 
84 


87 

87 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident or dis- 

( ilSl i • • • • 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


- 


- 



The 3d Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, from Newburyport, Mass., was mustered into 
service for ninety days, May 3, 1864. It served at Fort Pickering, Salem, and was mustered out Aug. 5, 1864. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



319 



Unattached Companies of Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 
Fourth Company. — Capt. Alpheus J. Hillbourn. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 

Men. 


Total. 


Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in . 
company, 

Actual total of members of 
company, 


3 
3 


98 
98 


101 
101 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident or dis- 

CttSCj • • • • 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


- 


- 



The 4th Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, from Chelsea, Mass., was orgapized at Read- 
ville and mustered in for ninety days' service, May 3, 1864. It served at Fort Clark's Point, New Bedford, Mass., 
ami was mustered out Aug. 6, 1864. 



Fifth Company. 


— Capt. David H. Dyer. 










Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men' (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 

Actual total of members of 
company, 


3 
3 


98 
98 


101 
101 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident or dis- 
ease, .... 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 







The 5th Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, from Fall River, Mass., was organized at Read- 
ville and mustered into service May 4, 1864, for ninety days. It was stationed at Camp Meigs, Readville, and at 
Beach Street barracks during its service, and was mustered out Aug. 2, 1864. 



Sixth Company. — Capt. Charles P. Winslow. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 

Actual total of members of 
company, 


3 
3 


80 
80 


83 
83 


Killed and died of wounds , 

Died by accident or dis- 
ease, .... 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


- 


- 



The 6th Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, from Westborough, Mass., was organized at 
Readville, Mass., and mustered into service for ninety days, May 4, 1864. It served at Readville, Mass., and was 
mustered out Aug. 2, 1864. 



320 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Unattached Companies of Massachusetts Infantry (Militis), 
Seventh Company. — Capt. Albert E. Proctor. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


t 


Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 

Actual total of members of 
company, 


3 
3 


98 
98 


101 
101 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident or dis- 

CilSC, • • ■ • 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


1 


1 



The 7th Unattached Company Infantry, Maes. Volunteer Militia, from Boston, was organized at Readville, Mass., 
and mustered into service May 4, 1864, for ninety days. It served at Gallop's Island, Boston harbor, and was 
mustered out Aug. 5, 1864. 



Eighth Company. — Capt. 


Augustine L. Hamilton. 








Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 

Ac. aal total of members of 
company, 


3 
3 


94 
94 


97 
97 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident or dis- 

(.'■'I St.', • • ■ • 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


- 


- 



The 8th Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, from Lawrence, Mass., was organized at Read- 
ville, and mustered into service for ninety days, May 10, 1864. It served at Gallop's Island, Boston harbor, and was 
mustered out Aug. 11, 1864. 



Ninth Company. - 


— Capt. George H. Smith 


■ 








Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 

Actual total of members of 
company, 


3 
3 


97 
97 


100 
100 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident or dis- 
ease 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


- 


- 



The 9th Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, from Boston, was organized at Readville, Mass., 
and mustered into service for ninety days, May 10, 1864. It served at Gallop's Island, Boston harbor, and was 
mustered out Aug. 11, 1864. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



321 



Unattached Companies of Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 
Tenth Company. — Capt. George A. Perry. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 

Actual total of members of 
company, 


3 
3 


99 

1 
98 


102 

1 

101 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident or dis- 

CutiC| • • • • 

Died as prisoners, . . 


- 


- 


- 



The 10th Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, from Millbury, Mass., was mustered into 
service for ninety days, May 10, 1864. It served at Fort Warren, Boston harbor, and was mustered out Aug. 8, 
1864. 



Eleventh Company. — Capt. Jeremiah C. Bacheller. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 

Actual total of members of 
company, 


3 
3 


92 
92 


95 
95 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident or dis- 
ease, .... 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


- 


- 



The 11th Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, from Lynn, Mass., was organized at Readville, 
and mustered into service for ninety days, May 16, 1864. It served at Forts Sewall and Eastern Point, Gloucester, 
and at Marblehead. It was mustered out of service Aug. 15, 1864. 



Twelfth Company. — Capt. Charles F. Walcott, Bvt. Brig. Gen. IJ. S. Vols. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 

Actual total of members of 
company, 


3 

3 


98 
98 


101 
101 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident or dis- 
ease, .... 

Died as prisoners, 


- 


- 


- 



The 12th Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, from Cambridge, Mass., was organized at 
Readville, and mustered into service for ninety days, May 16, 1864. It served at Longs' Point, Provincttown, and 
was mustered out Aug. 15, 1864. 



322 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Unattached Companies of Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 
Thirteenth Company. — Capt. Robert W. Reeves. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 

Actual total of members of 
company, 


3 
3 


90 

1 

89 


93 

1 
92 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident or dis- 
ease, .... 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


» 


- 



The 13th Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, from Salem, Mass., was organized at Readville 
and mustered Into service May 16, 1864, for ninety days. It served at Fort Clark's Point, New Bedford, and was 
mustered out Aug. 15, 1864. 



Fifteenth Company. 


— Capt. Isaac A. Jennings. 








Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 

Actual total of members of 
company, 


3 
3 


88 
88 


91 
91 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident or dis- 

c use, ■ • • « 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


- 


- 



The 15th Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, from New Bedford, Mass., was organized at 
Readville and mustered into service for one hundred days, July 29, 1864. It served at Fort Warren, and was 
mustered out Nov. 15, 1864. 



Sixteenth Company. — 1 


3apt. John F. Croff 










Officers. 


Enlisted | Total 
Men 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 

Actual total of members of 
company, 


3 
3 


83 
83 


86 
86 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident or dis- 
ease, .... 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


- 


- 



The 16th Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, from Boston, was organized at Readville, 
Mass., and was mustered into service for one hundred days, Aug. 6, 1864. It served at Gallop's Island, Boston 
harbor, and was mustered out Nov. 14, 1864. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



323 



Unattached Companies of Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 
Seventeenth Company. — Capt. John G-. Barnes, 100 days and 1 year. 



Number on rolls, — 
100 days, . 
1 year, .... 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, — 

100 days, 

1 year, .... 

Actual total of members of 
company, — 
100 days, 
1 year 



Officers. 



Enlisted 
Men. 



98 
98 



98 
98 



Total 



101 
101 



101 
101 



Killed and died of wounds ,- 
100 days, . 
1 year, 



Died by accident or dis- 
ease, — 

100 days, . 
* 1 year, 



Died as prisoners, 
100 days, . 
1 year, 



Officers. 



Enlisted 
Men. 



Total. 



The 17th Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, was organized at Readville, Mass., and 
mustered into service for one hundred days, Aug. 5, 1864. It served at Fort Pickering, Salem, Mass., and was' 
mustered out Nov. 12, 1864. Re-enlisting at once for one year's service, it was organized at Salem and credited to 
Haverhill, Mass. It was mustered into service Nov. 13, 1864, and mustered out June 30, 1865. 



Eighteenth Company. - 


— Capt 


. Otis A. Baker, 100 days 


and 1 


year. 






Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


- 


Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, — 
100 days, 
1 year, .... 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, — 

100 days, 

1 year, .... 

Actual total of members of 
company, — 
100 days, 
1 year, .... 


3 
3 

3 
3 


81 
98 

81 
98 


84 
101 

84 
101 


Killed and died of wounds,- 
100 days, . 
1 year, 

Died by accident or dis- 
ease, — 
100 days, •. 
1 year, 

Died as prisoners, — 

100 days, . . . 
1 year, 


- 


1 


1 



The 18th Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, was organized at Readville, Mass., and 
mustered into service for one hundred days, Aug. 6, 1864. It served at Camp Meigs, Readville, and was mustered 
out Nov. 14, 1864. It was organized for one year's service at Taunton, Mass., and was mustered Dec. 6 and 7, 1864. 
Serving still at Readville, it was mustered out May 12, 1865. 



324 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Unattached Companies of Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 

Nineteenth Company. — (1) Capt. James M. Mason, 100 days. 

(2) Capt. Frank A. Johnson, 1 year. 



Number on rolls, — 
100 days, . 
1 year, .... 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, — 

100 days, 

1 year, .... 

Actual total of members of 
company, — 
100 days, 
1 year, .... 



Officers. 



Enlisted 
Men. 



80 
98 



80 
98 



Total. 



83 
101 



83 
101 



Killed and died of wounds,- 
100 days, . 
1 year, 



Died by accident or dis- 
ease, — 

100 days, . 
1 year, 



Died as prisoners, ■ 
100 days, . 
1 year, 



Officers. 



Enlisted 
Men. 



Total. 



The 19th Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, was organized at Readville, Mass , and 
mustered into service for one hundred days, Aug. 9, 1864. It served at Fort Warren, Boston harbor, and was 
mustered out Nov. 16, 1864 Re-enlisting for one year's service, it was organized at Fort Warren and mustered in 
Nov. 25, 1864. It served at Fort Winthrop, and was mustered out June 27, 1865. 



Twentieth Company. 


— Capt. Lewis Soule, 100 days and 1 year. 






Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, — 
100 days, 
1 year, .... 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, — 

100 days, . 

1 year, .... 

Actual total of members of 
company, — 
100 days, 
1 year, .... 


3 
3 

3 
3 


87 
98 

. 87 
1 98 


90 
101 

90 
101 


Killed and died of vrounds,- 
100 days, . 
1 year, 

Died by accident or dis- 
ease, — 

100 days, . 

1 year, ... 

Died as prisoners, — 
100 days, . 
1 year, 


1 1 II ll 


- 


I : 



The 20th Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, was organized at Readville, Mass., to serve 
one hundred days, and was mustered in Aug. 11, 1864. It served at Fort Sewall, Marblehead, Mass., and was 
mustered out Nov. 18, 1864. Organized at Marblehead, it was mustered into seivice the following day for n term of 
one year. Serving at the Fort at Salisbury Beach, it was mustered out June 29, I860. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



325 



Unattached Companies of Massachusetts Infantry (Militia) . 

Twenty-first Company. — (1) Capt. David H. Dyer, 100 days. 

(2) Capt. Royal W. Thayer, 1 year. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, — 








Killed and died of wounds,- 








100 days, 


3 


97 


100 


100 days, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 year, .... 


3 


97 


100 


1 year, 


- 


- 


- 


Enlisted men (included 
















above) commissioned in 








Died by accident or dis- 








company, — 








ease, — 








100 days, 


- 


- 


- 


100 days, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 year, .... 


- 


- 


- 


1 year, 


- 


1 


1 


Actual total of members of 
















company, — 








Died as prisoners, . 








100 days, 


3 


97 


100 


100 days, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 year, .... 


3 


97 


100 


1 year, 


— 


— 


— 



The 21st Unattached Company Infantry, MaBB. Volunteer Militia, -was organized at Readville, MaaB., and 
mustered into service for one hundred days, Aug. 11, 1864. It served at Long's Point, Provincetown, and was 
mustered out Nov. 18, 1864. Organized at Fall River, Mass., it was mustered in for one year's service, Nov. 23-29, 
1864. It served at Provincetown, and was mustered out June 28, 1865. 



Twenty- 


second 


Company. — 


-Capt. John W. Marble. 








Officers 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 

Actual total of members of 
company, 


3 
3 


85 
85 • 


88 
88 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident or dis- 
ease, .... 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


- 


- 



The 22d Unattached Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, was organized at Readville, Mass., aDd 
mustered into service for a term of one hundred days, Aug. 18, 1864. It served at Camp Meigs, and was mustered 
out Nov. 25, 1864. ' 



Twenty-third 


Company. — 


-Capt. Jabez M. Lyle. 








Officers. 


s Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 

Actual total of members of 
company, 


3 
3 


98 
98 


101 
101 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident or dis- 

CitSCj • • • • 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


- 


- 



The 23d Company Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, was organized at Readville, Mass., and mustered into service 
for one hundred days, Aug. 18, 1864. It served at Camp Meigs, and was mustered out Nov. 26, 1864. 



326 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Unattached Companies of Massachusetts Infantry. 
Twenty-fourth Company. — Capt. Joshua H. Wilkie. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 
Enlisted men (included 

above) commissioned in 

company, 
Actual total of members of 

company, 


3 
3 


99 

1 
98 


102 

1 
101 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident or dis- 
ease, .... 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


- 


- 



The 24th Unattached Company Mass. Infantry was organized at Plymouth, Mass., to serve for one year, and 
mustered in from Dec. 16 to 22, 1864. It served at Camp Meigs, and was mustered out May 12, 1865. 



Twenty -fifth Company. — 


-Capt. Fitz J. Babson. 








Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 
Enlisted men (included 

above) commissioned in 

company, 
Actual total of members of 

company, 


3 
3 


98 
98 


101 
101 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident or dis- 
ease, .... 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


- 


- 



The 25th Unattached Company Mass. Infantry was organized at Salem, Mass., and mustered into service for one 
year, Dec. 9, 1864. It served at Fort Miller, Marblehead, and was mustered out June 29, 1865. 



Twenty 


-sixth Company. — 


Capt. Walter D. Keith. 








Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 
Enlisted men (included 

above) commissioned in 

company. 
Actual total of members of 

company, 


4 

4 


98 
98 


102 
102 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident or dis- 

C£LS6; • • ■ • 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


- 


- 



The 26th Unattached Company Mass. Infantry was organized at New Bedford, Mass., and mustered into service 
for one year, Dec. 13, 1864. It served at Camp Meigs, and was mustered out May 12, 1865. 



Twenty-seventh Company. — 


Capt. Samuel C. Graves. 








Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 
Enlisted men (included 

above) commissioned in 

company, 
Actual total of members of 

company, 


3 
3 


98 
98 


101 
101 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident or dis- 

CclbfcJ) • • • • 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


2 


2 



The 27th Unattached Company Mass. Infantry was organized at Salem, Mass., and mustered into service for one 
year, Dec. 30, 1864, to Jan. 9, 1865. It served at Fort Warren, and was mustered out June 30, 1865. 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



327 



First Corps Cadets Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 
Capt. Christopher C. Holmes, with rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
corps, .... 

Actual total of members of 
corps, .... 


10 
10 


106 
106 


116 
116 


Killed and died of wounds, 

Died by accident or dis- 
ease, .... 

Died as prisoners, . 




- 


- 



The First CorpB Cadets, or Boston Cadets, Mass. Volunteer Militia, was mustered into the United States service 
May 26, 1862. It served at Fort Warren, Boston harbor, and -was mustered out July 2, 1862. 



Second Corps Cadets Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 
Maj. John L. Marks. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
corps, .... 

Actual total' of members of , 
corps, .... 


7 

7 


123 
123 


130 
130 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident or dis- 

GilSC) • • • ■ 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


1 


1 



The Second Corps Cadets, or Salem Cadets, Mass. Volunteer Militia, was mustered into the United States service 
May 26, 1862. It served at Fort Warren, Boston harbor, and was mustered out Oct. 11, 1862. 



Company B, Seventh Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). 

Capt. Edward H. Staten. 





Officers. 


Enlisted 
-. Men. 


Total. 




Officers. 


Enlisted 
Men. 


Total. 


Number on rolls, 

• 

Enlisted men (included 
above) commissioned in 
company, 

Actual total of members of 
company, 


3 
3 


100 
100 


103 
103 


Killed and died of wounds, 
Died by accident or dis- 

*.'il. 1S(J, • • • • 

Died as prisoners, . 


- 


- 


- 



Co. B, Seventh Regiment, Mass. Volunteer Militia, from Salem, Mass., was mustered into the United States 
service July 1, 1862. It served at Fort Warren, Boston harbor, and was mustered out Dec. 31, 1862. 



328 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in 

Action. 



Name and Rank.* 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Abbott, Edward G., Bvt. Maj., . 
Abbott, Henry L., Bvt. Brig. Gen., 
Abbott, James H., Sergt., 
Ackerman, James B., 
Adams, Artemas, . 
Adams, Charles A., 
Adams, Charles R., 
Adams, George E., 
Adams, John Q., . 
Adams, Orlestus J., 
Adams, Walter T., 
Adams, William, . 
Addison, Andrew, 
Ahern, John, 
Aiken, Alexander, 
' Aiken, Samuel, . 
Ainsworth, Henry W., 
Albert, Henry, 
Alcorn, Andrew, . 
Alden, Frederick D., 
Alden, George M., 
Alden, George W., 
Aldrich, Albro W., 
Alexander, Edward, 
Alexander, James M., 
Alexander, John K., 
Alexander, Leonard J., Sergt., 
Alexander, William R., 



U. S. Vols., 
U. S. Vols., 
10th Inf., 
2d Cav., 
24th Inf., 
33d Inf., 
3d Cav., 
34th Inf., 
1st Co. S. S 
32d Inf., 
3d Cav., 
9th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
1st H. A., 
15th Inf., 
54th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
5th Batt. L 
57th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
40th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
36th Inf., 
29th Inf., 
21st Inf., 
25th Inf., 



A., 



Cedar Mountain, Va. 
Wilderness, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Halltown, Va., . 
Richmond, Va., . 
Lookout Mountain, '. 
Winchester, Va., 
New Market, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Laurel Hill, Va., 
White Plains, La., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Wilderness, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Fort Wagner, S. C, 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Petersburg, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Drewry's Bluff, Va., 



1 


Aug. 


9, 1862. 


• 


May 


6, 1864. 


• 


May 


12, 1864. 


• 


Aug. 


26, 1864. 


. 


Oct. 


13, 1864. 


renn., 


Oct. 


29, 1863. 


• 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


• 


May 


15, 1864. 


• 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


• 


May 


12, 1864. 


• 


Nov. 


9, 1863. 


. 


June 


27, 1862. 


• 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


• 


May 


5, 1864. 


• 


July 


3, 1863. 


• 


May 


19, 1864. 


• 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


• 


July 


18, 1863. 


• 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


• 


June 


2, 1864. 


• 


May 


6, 1864. 


• 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


. 


June 


24, 1864. 


• 


Sept. 


17,' 1862. 


• 


May 


12, 1864. 


• 


May 


12, 1864. 


• 


June 


29, 1864. 


. . 


May 


16, 1864. 



* Private understood when not otherwise stated. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



329 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Allen, Albert, 

Allen, David, Jr., Lieut. Col., 

Allen, Dwight D., 1st Sergt., 

Allen, Emory, 

Allen, George E., . 

Allen, George S., . 

Allen, George W., 

Allen, Isaac F., . 

Allen, James, 

Allen, John, Corp., 

Allen, John, . 

Allen, John, . 

Allen, John F., Corp., . 

Allen, Jules R., Corp., 

Allen, Lyman, 

Allen, Pickering D., 1st Lieut. 

Alley, Leander F., 2d Lieut., 

Almy, Hiram H., . 

Almy, Pardon, Jr., 2d Lieut. 

Amende, John, 

Ames, Moses S., Corp., 

Ames, Thomas C, 

Amidon, Henry L., 

Ampley, Thomas R., . 

Andrews, Arthur J., . 

Andrews, Charles B., . 

Andrews, Charles E., . 

Andrews, Walter B., . 

Andrews, William, Sergt., 

Andrews, William B. D., 

Angell, J. Frank, Sergt., 

Ankemins, Joseph, 

Anthony, William H., . 

Appleton, Charles A. G., 



49th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
55th Inf., 
58th Inf., 
1st Co. S. S 
19th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
1st Inf., 
28th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
33d Inf., 
12th Inf., 
3d Cav., 
20th Inf., 
23d Inf., 
18th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
37th Inf., 
IstH. A., 
15th Inf., 
54th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
13th Inf., 
19th Inf., 
1st Inf., 
2d Inf., 
35th Inf., 
38th Inf., 
11th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
1st Batt. L 



A.,. 



Port Hudson, La., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Honey Hill, S. C, 
Petersburg, Va., 
Jones' Farm, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Ball's Bluff, Va., 
Fair Oaks, Va , . 
Glendale, Va., . 
Petersburg, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Brashear City, La., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Whitehall, N. C, 
Bull Run, 2d, Va.; 
Wilderness, Va., 
Winchester, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Fort Wagner, S. C, 
Antietam, Md., . 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Glendale, Va., . 
Yorktown, Va., . 
Cedar Mountain, Va. 
Petersburg, Va., 
Port Hudson, La., 
Hatcher's Run, Va., 
North Anna River, Va., 
Middletown, Va., 



May 27, 1863. 

May 5, 1864. 

July 30, 1864. 

Nov. 30, 1864. 

July 30, 1864. 

May 31, 1864. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

Oct. 21, 1861. 

June 18, 1862. 

June 30, 1862. 

March 25, 1865. 

July 3, 1863. 

July 2, 1863. 

May 10, 1864. 

June 2, 1863. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

Dec. 16, 1862. 

"Aug. 30, 1862. 

May 6, 1864. 

Sept. 19, 1864. 

June 16, 1864. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

July 18, 1863. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

July 1,1863. 

June 30, 1862. 

April 26, 1862. 

Aug. 9, 1862. 

Sept. 30, 1864. 

June 14, 1863. 

March 31, 1865. 

May 24, 1864. 

Oct. 19, 1864. 



330 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Archpool, Lawrence, . 
Arlen, Wallace S., 
Ailing, Alonzo, . 
Armstrong, Charles R., 
Armstrong, Dwight E., Corp., 
Armstrong, William, . 
Ash, Francis, 

Ashley, William A., 1st Lieut., 
Atkins, James B., 
Atkinson, Daniel W., . 
Atkinson, George A., . 
Atkinson, Robert, 
Atwood, Eli, Sergt., 
Atwood, Frederick E., 
Atwood, Joshua, . 
Atwood, William M., . 
Austin, Henry, 
Austin, James H., 
Avery, Michael, . 
Ayers, Benjamin F., . 
Babbington, William, Sergt., 
Babbitt, Charles E., 
Babson, Sylvanus B., Sergt., 
Bachelor, Alfred A., . 
Backus, Charles H., . 
Bacon, David H., Corp., 
Bacon, William B., Bvt. Maj., 
Badger, Abner H., 
Badger, Stephen, Corp., 
Bailey, A. Fernando, 1st Sergt., 
Bailey, George, Corp., . 
Bailey, George A., 
Bailey, George M., 
Bailey, S. Henry, Capt., 



9th Inf., 


. 


53d Inf., 


• 


20th Inf., 


• 


13th Inf., 


• 


10th Inf., 


• 


20th Inf., 


. 


9th Inf., 


• 


10th Inf., 


• 


58th Inf., 


• 


10th Batt. 1 


j. A., 


13th Inf., 


• 


IstH. A., 


> 


18th Inf., 


• 


18th Inf., 


• 


12th Inf., 


. 


18th Inf., 


■ 


29th Inf., 


. 


12th Inf., 


• 


39th Inf., 


• 


12th Inf., 


■ 


12th Inf., 


• 


39th Inf., 


. 


32d Inf., 




15th Inf., 


» • 


2d Cav., 


• 


22d Inf., 


• 


U. S. Vols. 


. 


11th Inf., . 


• 


1st Inf., 


. 


36th Inf., 


• 


56th Inf., 


• 


26th Inf., . 


. 


2d Inf., 


• 


36th Inf., . 


• 



Wilderness, Va., 
Port Hudson, La., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Hatcher's Run, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Wilderness, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
White Oak Swamp, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Laurel Hill, Va., 

Rockville, Md., . 
North Anna River, Va 
New Market, Va., 
Williamsburg, Va., 
Chancellorsville, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Winchester, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 



May 

June 

Dec. 

Dec. 

May 

May 

May 

May 

June 

Oct. 

July 

May 

Dec. 

Aug. 

May 

Aug. 

June 

Sept. 

May 

Sept. 

July 

May 

May 

July 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
June 
Sept. 
July 
May 



8, 1864. 

14, 1863. 

11, 1862. 
13, 1862. 

3, 1863. 
6, 1864. 

12, 1864. 

5, 1864. 
3, 1864. 

27, 1864. 

1, 1863. 

19, 1864. 

13, 1862. 
30, 1862. 

6, 1864. 
30, 1862. 
30, 1862. 
17, 1862. 
10, 1864. 

17, 1862. 
1, 1863. 
8, 1864. 

18, 1864. 

13, 1864. 
23, 1864. 

15, 1864. 
5, 1862. 
3, 1863. 

12, 1864. 
17, 1864. 

19, 1864. 
3, 1863. 

12, 1864. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



331 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Baker, Adam N., . . ' . 




15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1S62. 


Baker, Charles, .... 




5Gth Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


24, 1864. 


Baker, Frederick, 




39th Inf., . 


Weldon Railroad, Va., 


Aug. 


19, 1864. 


Baker, John H., Sergt., 




12th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


18, 1864. 


Baker, Noah, .... 




52d Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Baker, Rudolphus L., . 




27th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


2, 1864. 


Baker, William H 




13th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Balcom, Myron L., . 




2d Inf., 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Baldwin, Hubbard H., Sergt., . 




26th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Baldwin, Joseph 




19th Inf., . 


Fair Oaks, Va., . 


June 


25, 1862. 


Ball, Charles M 




25th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


Aug. 


20, 1864. 


Ball, Henry C, 1st Sergt., . 




15th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Ball, Levi, 




25th Inf., . 


Roanoke Island, N. C, 


Feb. 


8, 1862. 


Ball, Nehemiah F., 




20th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Baltz, John H 




10th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


6, 1864. 


Bancroft, George C, 1st Lieut., . 




40th Inf., . 


Old Church, Va., 


June 


1, 1864. 


Banks, Hiram B., 2d Lieut., 




16th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


Banks, John E., Corp., 




37th Inf., . 


Charlestown, Va., 


Aug. 


21, 1864. 


Bannerot, Constant E., 




10th Inf., . 


Salem Heights, Va., . 


May 


3, 1863. 


Bans, William, 




24th Inf., . 


New Berne, N. C, 


March 14, 1862. 


Barber, William, . 




28th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Barden, Jonas P., ... 




39th Inf., . 


- 


June 


22, 1864. 


Bardwell, Henry C, . 




27th Inf., . 


Roanoke Island, N. C, 


Feb. 


8, 1862. 


Bardwell, Orange, . . . 




37th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Barker, Asa, Artificer, . . , 




IstH. A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


Barker, Isaac S., . 




20th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


11, 1862. 


Barlow, Edwin W., 




34th Inf., . 


Island Ford, Va., 


July 


18, 1864. 


Barnard, Edmund E., . 




48th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


May 


21, 1863. 


Barnes, Thvight W., Corp., . 




25th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Barnes, George N., 




37th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


10, 1864. 


Barnes, Hosea 0., 




10th Batt. L. A., 


Jones' Farm, Va., 


May 


30, 1864. 


Barnes, Walter S., 




2d Cav., . 


Ashby's Gap, Va., 


July 


12, 1863. 


Barns, John, 




2d Cav., . 


Waynesboro', Va., 


Sept. 


27, 1864. 


Barr, Elbridge C, Corp., 




21st Inf., . 


Chantilly, Va 


Sept. 


1, 1862. 



332 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Bane. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Barr, Robert G., 2d Lieut., . 
Barrett, Alexander, 2d Lieut., 
Barrett, Dwight, . 
Barrett, Francis J., 
Barrett, Nicholas J., 2d Lieut , 
Barrington, John F., . 
Barrows, William H., 2d Lieut., 
Barry, Darius, . . . 
Barry, Edward, . . . 
Barry, James H., Corp., 
Barry, John, 
Barry, Timothy, . 
Barry, William, . 
Barry, William F., 
Bartlett, Albert W., Capt., . 
Bartlett, Charles A., 
Bartlett, Edwin B., 1st Lieut., 
Bartlett, George B., 
Bartlett, Lyman C, 
Bartlett, Moses C, 1st Sergt., 
Bartlett, Nathan S., 
Bartlett, William H., Capt., 
Bascomb, Wallace, 

Bass, George L 

Bassett, Clarence W., . 
Bassett, Joseph C, Corp., . 
Bassett, Uriah, 
Batchelder, George W., Capt., 
Batchelder, Samuel, Jr., 
Batchelor, O. W., 
Bateman, Charles, 
Bates, Elijah T , Sergt., 
Batterson, Zadoc H., . 
Battles, Richard D., 



6th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
27th Inf., 
25th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
40th Inf., 
32dlnf.,, 
19th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
36th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
18th Inf., 
13th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
IstH. A., 
37th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
25th Inf., 
4th Inf., 
2d Inf., 
15th Inf., 
45th Inf., 
2d Inf., 
57th Inf., 
19th Inf., 
40th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
1st Cav., 
26th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
30th Inf., 



Tanner's Ford, Va., 
Chantilly, Va., . 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Salem Heights, Va., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Rappahannock Station, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Antietam, Md., . 
Wilderness, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Port Hudson, La., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Kinston, N. C, . 
Cedar Mountain, Va. 
Weldon Railroad, Va 
Antietam, Md., . ■ 
Drewry's Bluff, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Rappahannock Station, Va., 
Winchester, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Donaldsonville, La., 



Dec. 

Sept. 

June 

June 

Sept. 

June 

July 

Sept. 

July 

July 

May 

June 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

May 

May 

June 

May 

July 

June 

June 

July 

July 

Dec. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

May 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

July 



12, 1862. 

1, 1862. 

3, 1864. 

3, 1864. 
17, 1862. 

1, 1864. 

2, 1863. 
17, 1862. 

2, 1863. 

1, 1864. 

3, 1863. 
27, 1862. 

7, 1863. 
17, 1862. 

17, 1862. 

8, 1864. 

18, 1864. 
22, 1864. 

12, 1864. 
30, 1864. 

3, 1864. 

14, 1863. 

3, 1863. 

2, 1863. 
14, 1862. 

9, 1862. 

19, 1864. 
17, 1862. 

16, 1864. 

17, 1862. 
14, 1863. 
19, 1864. 
17, 1862. 

13, 1863. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



333 



.**;•■ 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Bank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Baxter, George H., 
Baxter, George 0., 
Baxter, George R., Corp., 
Beacon, George, . 
Beado, Albert, 
Beal, George W., . 
Beal, Morrill C, 1st Sergt., 

Bean, A. C 

Bean, Hibbard K., 
Bean, William H., 
Bears, Frank, 
Beauchmin, Calixte, Corp., 
Becker, Oscar, 
Bedell, Francis H., 
Beirne, James, 
Belden, Seth, 
Bell, James, . 
Bellows, Julius N., 
Bemis, Frederick A., 1st 
Bemis, Henry N., 
Benjamin, George F., . 
Benjamin, Samuel, 
Bennett, Albert, . 
Bennett, Benjamin F., . 
Bennett, Edward T., . 
Bennett, Elias H., 
Bennett, Henry, . 
Bennett, Jeremiah, 
Bennett, Nelson, Sergt., 
Bennett, Osmond, 
Bennett, Thomas G., . 
Benroy, Thomas, . 
Benson, William R., . 
Bentley, George W., . 



Lieut 



24th Inf., 
1st Inf., 
1st Inf., 
1st Inf., 
28th Inf., 
3d Cav., 
2d Cav., 
20th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
19th Inf., 
32d Inf., 
37th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
2d Inf., 
39th Inf., 
37th Inf., 
21st Inf., 
36th Inf., 
21st Inf., 
15th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
31st Inf., 
12th Inf., 
48th Inf., 
13th Inf., 
56th Inf., 
58th Inf., 
31st Inf., 
28th Inf., 
2d Inf., 
57th Inf., 
1st Inf., 
22d Inf., 



Tranter's Creek, N. C 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Chancellorsville, Va., 
Blackburn's Ford, Va 
Hatcher's Run, Va., 
Bayou De Glaize, La. 
Middletown, Md., 

Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Antietam, Md., . 
Laurel Hill, Va., 
Fort Fisher, Va., 
Fort Sedgwick, Va., 
ChaDcellorsville, Va., 
Laurel Hill, Va., 
Winchester, Va., 
Chantilly, Va., . 
Wilderness, Va., 
Chantilly, Va., . 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Ball's Bluff, Va., 
Mechanicsville, Va., 
Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Donaldsonville, La., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Petersburg, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Alexandria, La., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Wilderness, Va., 
Williamsburg, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 



June 5, 1862. 

June 25, 1862. 

May 3, 1863. 

July .18, 1861. 
March 25, 1865. 

May 18, 1864. 

Oct. 19, 1864. 

June 4, 1864. 

May 31, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

May 10, 1864. 

April 2, 1865. 

April 2, 1865. 

May 5, 1863. 

May 10, 1864. 

Sept. 19, 1864. 

Sept. 1, 1862. 

May 6, 1864. 

Sept. 1, 1862. 

May 31, 1862. 

Oct. 21, 1861. 

June 26, 1862. 

April 8, 1864. 

May 7, 1864. 

July 13, 1863. 

Aug. 30, 1862. 

July 30, 1864. 

June 3, 1864. 

May 14, 1864. 

June 3, 1864. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

May 6, 1864. 

May 5, 1862. 

June 18, 1864. 



334 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Bergen, William H., . 

Bergley, Edward, 

Berker, Peter, 

Berry, George 0., 

Berry, Gerrett G., Sergt., 

Berry, Samuel G., 1st Lieut. 

Berry, William, 1st Lieut., 

Bibby, George W., 1st Lieut. 

Bickford, Charles H., . 

Bickford, Walter, 

Bicknell, Alvah, . 

Bicknell, Nathan D., . 

Bigelow, Alvarando, . 

Bigelow, Edwin J., 

Bigelow, George T., 

Bills, Henry, 

Bingham, Clarence 0., 

Bird, Frank, . 

Bishop, Nathaniel P., . 

Bixby, Charles M., Sergt., 

Bixby, Oliver C, . 

Blackburn, Robert, Jr., Sergt., 

Blackington, Lyman D., Corp , 

Blackman, John H., 

Blaine, Hugh, 

Blair, Harmon H., 

Blaisdell, William, Bvt Brig. Gen., 

Blake, Dearborn S., . 

Blake, George R., 

Blake, Horace O., Corp., 

Blake, Lawrence R., . 

Blake, Luthan, 

Blake, Peleg W., 1st Lieut., 

Blake, Stephen, 



15th Inf., 
37th Inf , 
31st Inf., 
13th Inf., 
3d Cav., 
35th Inf., 
1st Co. S. S. 
32d Inf., 
2d Inf., 
2d Inf., 
1st Inf., 
16th Inf., 
21st Inf., 
61st Inf., 
21st Inf., 
57th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
40th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
58th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
19th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
U, S. Vols., 
35th Inf., 
38th Inf., 
1st Inf., 
29th Inf., 
18th Inf., 
5th Batt. L. A., 
9th Inf., . 



Petersburg, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Alexandria, La., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Totopotomoy, Va , 
Chancellorsville, Va., 
Cedar Mountain, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Chantilly, Va., . 
Petersburg, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Petersburg, Va., ■ 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Petersburg, Va , 
Wilderness, Va., 
White Oak Swamp, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., . 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Mechanicsville, Va., . 
Petersburg, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Port Hudson, La., 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Antietam, Md., . 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Petersburg, Va , 
Wilderness, Va., 



June 


22, 


May 


12, 


May 


3, 


Sept. 


17, 


April 


8, 


July 


30, 


Sept. 


17, 


May 


30, 


May 


3, 


Aug. 


9, 


Aug. 


29, 


July 


2, 


Sept. 


1, 


April 


3, 


Sept. 


17, 


June 


17, 


June 


22, 


May 


6, 


June 


2, 


July 


3, 


July 


30, 


May 


6, 


June 


30, 


Dec. 


13, 


July 


3, 


June 


26, 


June 


23, 


Sept. 


17, 


June 


14, 


June 


25, 


Sept. 


17, 


Dec. 


13, 


June 


18, 


May 


5, 



1864. 
1864. 
1864. 
1862. 
1864. 
1864. 
1862. 
1864. 
1863. 
1862. 
1862. 
1863. 
1862. 
1865. 
1862. 
1864. 
1862. 
1864. 
1864. 
1863. 
1864. 
1864. 
1862. 
1862. 
1863. 
1862. 
1864. 
1862. 
1863. 
1862. 
1862. 
1862. 
1864. 
1864. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



335 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action - 


- Continued. 


Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Blakesley, Charles, .... 


37th Inf., . 


Sailor's Creek, Va., . 


April 


6, 1865. 


Blanchard, Otis S 


58th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Blanchard, Warren A , Corp., 


13th Inf, . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Blankenburg, George, Corp., 


20th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Blatchford, James, .... 


30th Inf., . 


Fisher's Hill, Va., . 


Sept. 


22, 1864. 


Blessington, Bernard, .... 


1st Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


Bliss, Henry R., 


15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Blodgett, George W., . 


6th Inf., . 


Deserted House, Va., 


Jan. 


30, 1863. 


Blood, Lyman R., 


20th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


Oct. 


18, 1864. 


Blood, Miles H., . 


37th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Blood, William L., Corp., . 


15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Boder, Henry, 


20th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Boerdhouse, Dennis, .... 


45th Inf., . 


Whitehall, Va 


Dec. 


16, 1862. 


Bolio, David 


27th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., ; 


June 


3, 1864. 


Bolio, Levi M 


27th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


17, 1864. 


Bolton, John, 


58th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Bolton, Samuel M., Sergt., . 


37th Inf., . 


Sailor's Creek, Va., . 


April 


6, 1865. 


Bond, Edward E., .... 


13th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Bond, Herbert W., Sergt., . 


57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., • . 


May 


6, 1864. 


Bond, James, 


16th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Bond, William J., Sergt., . 


25th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Bonner, Joseph 


15th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Bonney, James A. 


15th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


20, 1864. 


Bootman, Charles E., Sergt., 


4th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Borden, Daniel W., .... 


20th Inf ., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Borden, Theodore F., Sergt., 


58th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


2, 1864. 


Boren, Benjamin F., . 


18th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Bortchy, George, 


2d Inf., 


_ Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Boston, John, 


2d Cav., . 


Fisher's Hill, Va., . 


Oct. 


8, 1864. 


Bosworth, Henry L., Jr., 


3d Cav., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Boucher, William, Sergt., . 


11th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


Boulter, Alpheus, .... 


11th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


Bourne, William S., . 


57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Bousley, Theophilus S., . . . 


48th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


12, 1863. 



336 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Bouza, Henry, 

Bowden, Ernest, . 

Bowden, Thomas Q., 1st Lieut., 

Bowen, George E., 

Bowen, Henry, Sergt., . 

Bowers, Henry, . 

Bowler, Daniel, . 

Bowles, Ira, .... 

Bowman, Samuel M., 1st Lieut., 

Boyer, Isaiah, 

Boynton, Charles, 

Boynton, Herbert, Jr., 

Boynton, William S., . 

Boynton, Winthrop P., Capt., 

Bracken, Mark, . 

Bradburn, Martin, 

Bradford, George,* 

Bradish, George "W., . 

Bradley, Edward R., . 

Bradley, Roscoe, Corp., 

Brady, Dennis, 

Brady, William, . 

Braley, Edward B., 

Braman, James H., Sergt., . 

Bramhall, George, 

Bramon, Owen, . 

Bramon, Thomas, 

Brantez, William, 

Brasie, Knapp, 

Brazier, Charles A., 1st Sergt., 

Breed, George E., Corp., 

Breen, Dennis, 

Breen, Peter, 

Breen, Thomas, . 



59th Inf., 
33d Inf., 
11th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
34th Inf., 
4th Cav., 
6th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
55th Inf., 
19th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
21st Inf., 
55th Inf., 
49th Inf., 
19th Inf., 
2d Cav., 
21st Inf., 
49th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
18th Inf., 
54th Inf., 
23d Inf., 
10th Inf., 
33d Inf., 
28th Inf., 
56th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
1st Inf., 
19th Inf., 
34th Inf., 
36th Inf., 
32d Inf., 



Before Petersburg, Va., 
Resaca, Ga., 
Bull Run, Va., . 
Manassas, Va., . 
Antietam, Md., . 
Winchester, Va., 
Magnolia, Fla., . 
Carrsville, Va., . 
Petersburg, Va., 
Honey Hill, S. C, 
Glendale, Va., . 
Salem Heights, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Honey Hill, S. C, 
Port Hudson, La., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Fisher's Hill, Va., 
Chantilly, Va., . 
Donaldsonville, La., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Shepherdstown, Va., 
Front of Fort Wagner, S. C, 
New Berne, N. C, 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Resaca, Ga., 
Hatcher's Run, Va., 
North Anna River, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Laurel Hill, Va., 
Williamsburg, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Lynchburg, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 



June 17 

May 15 

July 21 

Aug. 29 ; 

Sept. 17 

Sept. 19 

Aug. 13 

May 15 

March 25 

Nov. 30 

June 30 

May 3 

Sept. 17 

Nov. 30 

May 27 

Dec. 13 



Oct. 
Sept. 



1 



July 13 

Sept. 17 

Sept. 20 

July 18 

April 29 

May 31 

May 16 
March 25 

May 24 

July 2 

May 10 

May 5 

May 10 

June 18 

May 12 

June 20 



1864. 
1864. 
1861. 
1862. 
1862. 
1864. 
1864. 
1863. 
1865. 
1864. 
1862. 
1863. 
1862. 
1864. 
1863. 
1862. 
1864. 
1862. 
1863. 
1862. 
1862. 
1863. 
1862. 
1862. 
1864. 
1865. 
1864. 
1863. 
1864. 
1862. 
1864. 
1864. 
1864. 
1864. 



* Proved to have been discharged September, 1865, to date July 20, 1865. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



337 



List of Massachusetts Officers and. Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Bresnehan, John, . 
Bresnehan, Michael, . 
Brewer, Alonzo C, 
Brewer, Charles C, 
Brewer, George W., Corp., 
Brewer, George W., Sergt., 
Brewer, Henry W., 
Brewer, John W., 
Brickett, George W., . 
Bridges, Thomas, 
Briggs, Andrew J., 
Briggs, Elijah M., 
Briggs, George, . 
Briggs, Lucius H., 
Briggs, Obed N., Corp., 
Bright, Henry, 
Brightman, James L., Sergt. 
Bringolf, Jacob, . 

Briody, James, 

Britton, James H., 

Broad, Lyman, 

Broadbent, Charles W., 

Brock, Francis B., 

Brock, John M., . 

Brock, Orville, 

Bronseau, Peter, . 

Brooks, Asa D., . 

Brooks, Jonathan, 

Brooks, Levi, 

Brooks, Richard, . 

Brooks, Stephen F., Sergt 

Brotgers, Lewis, . 

Brown, Abraham, 

Brown, Charles, . 



Corp 



9th Inf., 
25th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
27th Inf., 
25th Inf., 
27th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
27th Inf., 
IstH. A., 
19th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
23d Inf., 
15th Inf., 
23d Inf., 
2d Inf., 
7th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
20tb Inf., 
18th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
18th Inf., 
25th Inf., 
13th Inf., 
24th Inf., 
34th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
36th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
54th Inf., 
55th Inf., 



Laurel Hill, Va., 
Roanoke Island, N. C, 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Ball's Bluff, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Near Fair Oaks, Va 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Whitehall, N. C, 
Antietam, Md., . 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Cedar Mountain, Va., 
Salem Heights, Va., 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Preble's Farm, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Tranter's Creek, N. C 
Cedar Creek, Va., 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Glendale, Va., . 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
James Island, S. C, 
Honey Hill, S. C, 



May 

Feb. 

May 

June 

June 

June 

Oct. 

June 

.May 

Sept. 

May 

May 

Dec. 

Sept. 

June 

Aug. 

May 

May 

Dec. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

May 

June 

July 

June 

Oct. 

June 

June 

May 

June 

May 

May 

July 

Nov. 



8, 1864. 

8, 1862. 

12, 1864. 
18, 1864J 

3, 1864. 
18, 1864. 

21, 1861. 
18, 1864. 

22, 1864. 
17, 1862. 
31, 1862. 
31, 1862. 

16, 1862. 

17, 1862. 
3, 1864. 

9, 1862. 
3, 1863. 

31, 1862. 

11, 1862. 
30, 1862. 

30, 1864. 
6, 1864. 
3, 1864. 
1, 1863. 
5, 1862. 

13, 1864. 

18, 1862. 
18, 1862. 

31, 1862. 
30, 1862. 

12, 1864. 
12, 1864. 
12, 1863. 
30, 1864. 



338 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Brown, Charles A., 
Brown, Charles H., 
Brown, David, 
Brown, Francis D., 
Brown, Frank C, 
Brown, Frederick H., 
Brown, George D., 
Brown, George F., 1st Lieut 
Brown, Henry 0., Corp., 
Brown, James, 1st Sergt., 
Brown, James L., Sergt., 
Brown, James W., 
Brown, John, 
Brown, John, 
Brown, John, 
Brown, John H., . 
Brown, John P., . . 
Brown, John W., . 
Brown, John W., . 
Brown, Lorenzo L., 1st Sergt 
Brown, Nathaniel, 
Brown, Samuel, Corp., 
Brown, Seva, 
Brown, Sheppard, 
Brown, Thomas, . 
Brown, Thomas, . 
Brownell, Darling M., . 
Broze, John, 
Bryan, Peter, Sergt., . 
Bryant, Asa T., . . 
Bryant, John, 
Bryant, John, 
Bryant, William E., Jr., 
Buchanan, James H., Corp., 



1st Inf., 
26th Inf., 
7th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
24th Inf., 
2d Inf., 
29th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
11th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
11th Inf., 
17th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
7th Inf., 
55th Inf., 
19th Inf., 
30th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
1st Inf., 
18th Inf., 
1st Cav., 
58th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
2d Inf., 
58th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
31st Inf., 
21st Inf., 
15th Inf., 
18th Inf., 
IstH. A., 
25th Inf., 
54th Inf., 



Chancellorsville, Va., 
Winchester, Va., 
Marye's Heights, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
New Berne, N. C, 
Cedar Mountain, Va., 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Fredericksburg, Va., . 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
New Berne, N. C, 
Antietam, Md., . 
Marye's Heights, Va., 
Honey Hill, S. C, . 
Dodsville Farm, Va., 
Cedar Creek, Va., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., . 
Rappahannock Station, 
St. Mary's Church, Va 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Antietam, Md., . 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Yellow Bayou, La., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Antietam, Md , . 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Olustee, Fla., 



Va., 



May 3, 1863. 

Sept. 19, 1864. 

May 3, 1863. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 
March 14, 1862. 

Aug. 9, 1862. 

June 15, 1862. 

July 3, 1863. 

July 2, 1863. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

May 13, 1864. 

May 23, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

May 3, 1863. 

Nov. 30, 1864. 

May 24, 1864. 

Oct. 19, 1864. 

June 27, 1862. 

Dec. 14, 1862. 

Nov. 7, 1863. 

June 24, 1864. 

May 12, 1864. 

May 6, 1864. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

May 12, 1864. 

May 8, 1864. 

May 18, 1864. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

May 19, 1864. 

June 3, 1864. 

Feb. 20, 1864. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



339 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement 


Date. 


Buck, William E., . 




20th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Buffum, Amos, Capt., . 




36th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


18, 1864. 


Buffum, Cincinnatus, . 




15th Inf., . 


Ball's Bluff, Va., 


Oct. 


21, 1861. 


Buffum, E. R 




15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Bullard, Francis, .... 




21st Inf., . 


Chantilly, Va., . 


Sept. 


1, 1862. 


Bullard, Moses H., 




22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Bullard, William T 




2d Inf., 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Bulpin, John,* .... 




27th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Bumpus, Edgar L., 1st Lieut., . 




33d Inf., . 


Resaca, Ga., 


May 


15, 1864. 


Bumpus, Jedediah, 




9th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Bunker, George C, 




35th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Bunning, John F., 




2d Inf., 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Burbank, Augustus F., 1st Sergt 


» • 


30th Inf., . 


Cedar Creek, Va., 


Oct. 


19, 1864. 


Burbank, Samuel, 




10th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


10, 1864. 


Burch, Joseph D., 




11th Inf., . 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Burdick, Joseph B., 




2d Cav., 


South Anna Bridge, Va., . 


June 


6, 1863. 


Burditt, George W., 




1st Inf., 


Williamsburg, Va., . 


May 


5, 1862. 


Burdsley, Joseph, . . 




15th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Burgess, Edwin D., . . 




34th Inf., . 


New Market, Va., ■ . 


May 


15, 1864. 


Burgess, Isaiah A., . . 




20th Inf., . 


Petersbuig, Va 


June 


22, 1864. 


Burke, Florence, .... 




37th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


18, 1864. 


Burke, James, 




2d Inf., . 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Burke, James E.,. 




21st Inf., . 


Chantilly, Va., . . ■. 


Sept. 


1, 1862. 


Burke, John, .... 




28th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Burke, John, .... 




28th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


6, 1864. 


Burke, John S., . 




1st H. A., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


16, 1864. 


Burke, John T., Sergt., 




20th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., . 


June 


20, 1864. 


Burke, Joseph, 




59th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Burke, Thomas, . 




57th Inf., . 


North Anna River, Va., . 


May 


24, 1864. 


Burke, Thomas F., 




10th Inf., . 


Malvern Hill, Va., 


July 


1, 1862. 


Burke, William, . 




28th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Burket, Elisha, . 




54th Inf., . 


James Island, S. C, . 


July 


16, 1863. 


Burn ham, Daniel, 




39th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Burnham, George A., . . 




34th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 



* AIbo reported as Bulfin, John, died in prison. 



340 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Burns, Edward, Sergt., 




56th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Burns, Frank, .... 




T 40th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Burns, John, 


■'•' 


11th Inf., . 


Williamsburg, Va., . 


May 


5, 1862. 


Burns, John, 




11th Inf., . 


Williamsburg, Va., . 


May 


5, 1862. 


Burns, John, 




24th Inf., . 


Morris Island, S. C, . 


Aug. 


36, 1863. 


Burns, Richard, .... 




1st Cav., . 


Barber's. Ford, Fla., . 


Feb. 


10, 1864. 


Burr, Charles, .... 




57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Burr, Horace D., Musician, 




11th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Burrage, Joseph P., 2d Lieut., . 




33d Inf., . 


Lookout Mountain, Tenn., . 


Oct. 


29, 1863. 


Burrill, David B., 1st Lieut., 




12th Inf., . 


North Anna River, Va., . 


May 


24, 1864. 


Burrill, Elbridge N 




1st H. A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va», 


May 


19, 1864. 


Burrill, George C, 1st Lieut., 




59th Inf., . 


North Anna River, Va., 


May 


24, 1864. 


Burrill, Horace P., 




20th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., . 


July 


3, 1863. 


Burrill, William L., 1st Sergt., . 




1st H. A., . 


Petersburg, Va., . 


June 


22, 1864. 


Burrows, Samuel, 




1st Cav., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Burton, George L., 




38th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Bush, George, Capt., . 




13th Inf., . 


Fitzhugh House, Va., 


April 


30, 1863. 


Bush, George W., 




55th Inf., . 


Honey Hill, S. C, . 


Nov. 


30, 1864. 


Bushman, Joseph, 




37th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Buss, Henry K., Corp., 




21st Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Bussell, Alfred W., . 




58th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


July 


12, 1864. 


Butcher, William T.,* Sergt., 




2d Cav., . 


Waynesboro', Va., 


Sept. 


28, 1864. 


Butler, George, 




15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Butler, John, 




9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Butler, John E., . 




11th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Butters, John, 




15th Inf., . 


- 


Jan. 


12, 1864. 


Buxton, Philip 0., Corp., . 




33d Inf., . 


Lookout Mountain, Tenn.,' 


Oct. 


29, 1863. 


Byam, Salathial A., 




57th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


17, 1864. 


Cabot, Charles F., Capt., 




20th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


11, 1862. 


Cadney, Frank, . 




10th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Cadron, William, . 




4th Cav., . 


Gum Creek, Fla., 


Oct. 


24, 1864. 


Cady, Curtis, Wagoner, 




15th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Cady, John D., 




2d Inf., 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Caffrey, Archibald, 




22d Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 


May 


10, 1864. 



* Alias Benjamin F. Williams. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



341 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Cahill, John, 
Cahill, Thomas, . 
Cahill, Timothy, . 
Cain, Charles, 
Cain, George W., Corp., 
Caldwell, John C, 
Caldwell, William M., . 
Calhoun, Hugh, . 
Callahan, Patrick, 
Callihan, Timothy, 
Calon, William, . 
Calwell, Bernard, Sergt., 
Cameron, James E., . 
Cammett, Frank E., Corp., 
Campbell, Alexander, . 
Campbell, Allen, . 
Campbell, John, . 
Campbell, John R., 

Campbell, Richard, 

Campbell, Thomas, 

Campsey, Thomas, Sergt., 

Cantwell, Patrick, 

Canty, John, 

Capen, Avery A., 

Capron, Arnold, . 

Carey, Charles E., Corp., 

Carey, Hugh, 1st Sergt., 

Carey, John, Capt., 

Carlan, James, 

Carlen, Philip, 

Carletori, Edward, 1st Lieut 

Carleton, William, 

Carley, Stever W., 

Carling, Charles P., 



57th Inf., 
1st Cav., 
9th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
19th Inf., 
3d Batt. L. 
57th Inf., 
1st Inf., 
28th Inf., 
19th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
27th Inf., 
11th Inf., 
33d Inf., 
59th Inf., 
39th Inf., 
loth Inf., 
10th Inf., 
27th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
26th Inf., 
11th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
34th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
1st Cav., 
9th Inf., 
53d Inf., 
22d Inf., 
40th Inf., 
39th Inf., 
49th Inf., 
5th Batt. L 



A., 



A.,, 



Spotsylvania, Va., 
Bauer's Ford, Fla., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Chantilly, Va., . 
Malvern Hill, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Lookout Mountain, Tenn., 
Petersburg, Va., 

Petersburg, Va., 

Antietam, Md., . 

Wilderness, Va , 

Drewry's Bluff, Va., 

Before Petersburg, Va. 

Totopotomoy, Va., 

Winchester, Va., 

Chancellorsville, Va., 

Fredericksburg, Va., 

Piedmont, Va., . 

Antietam, Md., . 

Aldie, Va., . 

Gaines' Mill, Va., 

Port Hudson, La., 

Petersburg, Va., . 

Cold Harbor, Va., 

Before Petersburg, Va., 

Port Hudson, La., 

Bottom's Bridge, Va., 



May 12, 1864. 

Feb. 4, 1864. 

June 27, 1862. 

May 12, 1864. 

May 5, 1864. 

July 11, 1864. 

May 6, 1864. 

Aug. 29, 1862. 

Sept. 1, 1862. 

July 1, 1862. 

Dec. 11, 1862. 

June 18, 1864. 

Aug. 29, 1862. 

Oct. 29, 1863. 

June 17, 1864. 

June 17, 1864. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

May 5, 1864. 

May 16, 1864. 

March 25, 1865. 

June 3, 1864. 

Sept. 19, 1864. 

May 3, 1863. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

June 5, 1864. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

June 17, 1863. 

June 27, 1862. 

June 14, 1863. 

June 18, 1864. 

June 3, 1864. 

May 8, 1864. 

May 27, 1863. 

June 8, 1864. 



342 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Carlton, George W.,* . 






10th Inf., . 


Virginia 


June 


19, 1862. 


Carney, Robert, . 






19th Inf., . 


Malvern Hill, Va., 


July 


1, 1862. 


Carney, "William, . 






9th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


8, 1864. 


Carpenter, Charles A., . 






38th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Carpenter, Daniel, 






15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Carpenter, John, . 






19th Inf., . 


Fair Oaks, Va., . 


June 


25, 1862. 


Carr, Charles H., Sergt., 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Carr, Henry C, . 






16th Inf., . 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Carr, John, . 






4th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Carr, Patrick, 






28th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Carroll, Charles W., Capt., 






18th Inf., . 


Bull Run, 2d, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Carroll, John, 






19th Inf., . 


White Oak Swamp, Va., . 


June 


30, 1862. 


Carroll, Michael, . 






58th Inf, . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


21, 1864. 


Carroll, Robert, . 






34th Inf., . 


Cedar Creek, Va., 


Oct. 


13, 1864. 


Carroll, Thomas, Corp., 






28th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Carter, Aaron, 






26th Inf., . 


Cedar Creek, Va., 


Oct. 


19, 1864. 


Carter, Adolphus 0., . 






22d Inf , . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Carter, Albert H., Corp., 






36th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., ' . 


May 


6, 1864. 


Carter, Daniel, 






5th Cav., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


15, 1864. 


Carter, Nathan F., 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Carter, Rufus H., 






21st Inf., . 


Poplar Spring Church, Va., 


Sept. 


30, 1864. 


Carver, Thomas, . 






20th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


11, 1862. 


Cary, Richard, Capt., . 






2d Inf., 


Cedar Mountain, Va., 


Aug. 


9, 1862. 


Case, Harrison E., 






19th Inf., . 


White Oak Swamp, Va., . 


June 


30, 1862. 


Casey, John, 






34th Inf., . 


Piedmont, Va., . 


June 


5, 1864. 


Casey, John E., . 






10th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


15, 1864. 


Casey, Michael, . 






58th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Casey, Thomas, . 






13th Inf., . 


Near Petersburg, Va., 


June 


22, 1864. 


Casey, William, . 






28th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Casperson, John P., Corp., 






12th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Cassebourne, Charles W., S 


ergt., 




5th Inf., . 


Bull Run, Va., . 


July 


21, 1861. 


Cassidy, Francis, . 






19th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Cassidy, James, . 






10th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Cassidy, Thomas, 






56th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 



* Proved to have been mustered out in 20th Inf., July 16, 1865. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



343 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Caswell, Benjamin F., Sergt., 






18th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Caswell, C. L., 






15th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Caswell, John, 






28th Inf , . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Cate, George F., Sergt., 






20th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Cater, Silas N., . 






57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Chadduck, James L., . 






22d Inf , . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Chaffee, John, 






25th Inf , . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Chamberlain, Levi, 






36th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Chambers, Hiram A., . 






15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862: 


Champney, William L., Corp., . 






38th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Chandler, Charles L., Lieut. Col. 






57th Inf., . 


North Anna River, Va., 


May 


24, 1864. 


Chandler, Charles Peleg, Maj., . 






1st Inf., 


Glendale, Va 


June 


30, 1862. 


Chandler, Lucius C, . 






22d Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Channell, William H., 






40th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


1, 1864. 


Chapel, Lyman, .... 






37th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Chapin, George D., Sergt., . 






37th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Cbapin, Irving W., Sergt., . 






27th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., . 


June 


3, 1864. 


Chapin, Samuel A., 






27th Inf., . 


Drewry's Bluff, Va., . 


May 


16, 1864. 


Chaplin, Solon W., Corp., . 






34th Inf., . 


Piedmont, Va., . . 


June 


5, 1864. 


Chapman, Dwight, 






34th Inf., . . 


Stickney's Farm, Va., 


Oct. 


13, 1864. 


Chapman, Henry P., . 






59th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., . 


June 


17, 1864. 


Chapman, Richard W., 






16th Inf., . 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Chapman, William S., . 






15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Charleston, William, . 






55th Inf., . 


Honey Hill, S. C, . 


Nov. 


30, 1864. 


Chase, Charles, .... 






23d Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Chase, Edwin R., 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Chase, Ezra D., . 






20th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


9, 1864. 


Chase, George H., 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Chase, Jonas B., Corp., 






10th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Chase, Lewis, 






58th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Chenery, Frank A., 






36th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Chenery, John B., 






33d Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Cheney, Daniel S., 






1st Batt. L. A., . 


Charles City Cross Roads, 

Va. 
Petersburg, Va., 


June 


30, 1862. 


Cheney, E. Dexter, 1st Lieut., 






57th Inf., . 


July 


19, 1864. 



344 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action - 


— Continued. 


Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Cheney, Frederick S., Corp., 






57th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


March 25, 1865. 


Cheney, George A., 






19th Inf., . 


Fredericksbnrg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Cheney, James P., Corp., . 






15th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Chickering, Dwight, 






34th Inf., . 


Snicker's Ferry, Va., 


July 


18, 1864. 


Chickering, Lorenzo, . 






34th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Childs, Daniel V., 






36th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Childs, Frederick, 






22d Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 


May 


10, 1864. 


Childs, George W., Corp., . 






12th Inf., . 


Near- Fredericksburg, Va., 


Dec. 


18, 1862. 


Childs, Isaac, 






2d Inf., -. 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Childs, Martin G., Sergt., . 






38th Inf., . 


Fisher's Hill, Va., . 


Sept. 


22, 1864. 


Choate, John W., 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Christian, Stephen C, . 






58th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


17, 1864. 


Christie, Robert, . 






2d Inf., 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Chubbuck. James, Sergt., . 






18th Inf., . 


Bethesda Chnrch, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Church, David, 






7th Inf., . 


AVilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Church, David F., 






18th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Church, Edward, . 






13th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Church, Theodore A., Corp., 






37th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Churchill, Eliab R., Corp., . 






33d Inf., . 


Lookout Mountain, Tenn., 


Oct. 


29, 1863. 


Churchill, Frederick S., Corp., . 






18th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Churchill, Joseph L 






23d Inf., . 


New Berne, N. C, 


March 


14, 1862. 


Claffee, James 






25th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Claffee, Thomas, Bvt. Capt., 






U. S. Vols., 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Claflin, Henry A., ... 






22d Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Claflin, John R., .... 






21st Inf., . 


Chantilly, Va., . 


Sept. 


1, 1862. 


Clancey, William B., . 






16th Inf., . 


Fair Oaks, Va., . 


June 


18, 1862. 


Clapp, Charles H., 






32d Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 


May 


10, 1864. 


Clapp, Parvin, .... 






34th Inf., . 


Piedmont, Va., . 


June 


5, 1864. 


Clark, Albert R., .... 






37th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


9, 1864. 


Clark, Andrew, .... 






54th Inf., . 


Fort Wagner, S. C, . 


July 


18, 1863. 


Clark, Charles A., Sergt., . 






2d Cav., . 


Rectortown, Va., 


April 


30, 1864. 


Clark, Darius R., Corp., 






18th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Clark, David T., . . ...... 






2d H. A., . 


Kinston, N. C, . 


March 


8, 1865. 


Clark, Eben G., Corp., 






34th Inf., . 


Piedmont, Va., . 


June 


5, 1864. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



345 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Bank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Clark, Edwin R., . 

Clark, George,* . 

Clark, George E., . 

Clark, George H., Corp. 

Clark, George W., 

Clark, Henry A., . 

Clark, J. Warren, 

Clark, John A., . 

Clark, John C, Corp., 

Clark, Joseph L., Corp. 

Clark, Levi, . 

Clark, Lewis, 

Clark, Merritt L., . 

Clark, Michael, 

Clark, Nathaniel W., 

Clark, Newton H., 

Clark, Noah A., Corp., 

Clark, Patrick, 
Clark, Sylvester W., 
Clark, Thomas, . 
Clark, Willard E., 
Clark, William A., 
Clay, Thomas, 
Cleaveland, George W. 
Cleveland, Henry H., 
Clifford, Patrick W., 
Clifton, Benjamin D., 
Cline, Thomas, 
Clink, Richard W., 
Clisbee, Harrison J., 
Clough, Edgar, 2d Lieut., 
Coakley, Jeremiah, 
Coates, John F., . 
Cobb, Andrew J., Corp., 



45th Inf., 
13th Inf., 
37th Inf., 
33d Inf., 
24th Inf , 
24th Inf., 
21st Inf., 
19th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
27th Inf., 
54th Inf., 
loth Inf , 
23d Inf., 
23d Inf., 
34th Inf., 
34th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
24th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
3d Cav., 
28th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
18th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
34th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
11th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
24th Inf., 
16th Inf , 
22d Inf., 
33d Inf., 



Kinston, N. C, . 

Thoroughfare Gap, Va. 

Wilderness, Va., 

Lookout Mountain, Tenn., 

Deep Run, Va., . 

Deep Run, Va., . 

Near Cold Harbor, Va. 

Wilderness, Va., 

Spotsylvania, Va., 

Manassas, Va., . 

Roanoke Island, N. C. 

Camden, S. C, . 

Spotsylvania, Va., 

Kirtston, N. C, . 

Kinston, N. C, . 

Winchester, Va., 

Rippon, Va., 

Gaines' Mill, Va., 

Little Washington, N. C, . 

Fredericksburg, Va., 

Cedar Creek, Va., 

Wilderness, Va., 

Antietam, Md., . 

Manassas, Va., . 

Antietam, Md., . 

New Market, Va., 

Fredericksburg, Va., 

Antietam, Md., . 

Gettysburg, Pa., 

Antietam, Md., . 

Drewry's Bluff, Va., 

Gettysburg, Pa., 

Gaines' Mill, Va., 

Resaca, Ga., 



Dec. 14, 1862. 

Aug. 28, 1862. 

May 6, 1864. 

Oct. 29, 1863. 

Aug. 16, 1864. 

Aug. 16, 1864. 

June 1, 1864. 

May 10, 1864. 

May 12, 1864. 

Aug. 29, 1862. 

Feb. 8, 1862. 

April 16, 1865. 

May 12, 1864. 
March 8, 1865. 
March 8, 1865. 

Sept. 19, 1864. 

Oct. 18, 1863. 

June 27, 1862. 

Sept. 6, 1862. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

Oct. 19, 1864. 

May 5, 1864. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

Aug. 30, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

May 15, 1864. 

Dec. 11, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

July 2, 1863. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

May 16, 1864. 

July 3, 1863. 

June 27, 1862. 

May 15, 1864. 



* Alias Michael Raum. 



340 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action - 


— Continued. 


Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Cobb, Joseph W , 






35th Inf., . 


South Mountain, Md., 


Sept. 


14, 1862. 


Cobleigh, Henry E., . 






57th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


18, 1864. 


Coburn, Charles F., 1st Sergt., 






16th Inf., . 


Fair Oaks, Va., . 


June 


18, 1862. 


Cody, Stephen, 






2d Inf., 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Coe, Edward I., 2d Lieut., . 






57th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


17, 1864. 


Coffey, Michael J., Sergt., . 






28th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Coffin, Gorham, Sergt., 






19th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Cogger, John, 






9th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


8, 1864. 


Coggins, Charles H., . 






13th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Colbert, Michael, . 






35th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va 


July 


30, 1864. 


Colburn, Dwight, . 






36th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


18, 1864. 


Colby, Henry, 






IstH A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


Colby, Hezekiah, Sergt., 






12th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Colby, Horace, 






29th Inf., . 


Big Bethel, Va., 


June 


10, 1861. 


Colby, William W., . 






18th Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 


May 


8, 1864. 


Cole, Freeman B., 






26th Inf., . 


La Fourch6 Crossing, La., . 


June 


21, 1863. 


Coleman, Horace D., . 






22d Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 


May 


10, 1864. 


Coleman, Perry M., 






10th Inf., . 


Fair Oaks, Va., . 


May 


31, 1862. 


Collar, Henry A., Corp., 






15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Collingill, John, . 






22d Inf., . 


Yorktown, Va., . 


April 


6, 1862. 


Collins, Garrett, . 






28th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Collins, George S., Corp., . 






1st H. A., . 


Near Petersburg, Va., 


June 


18, 1864. 


Collins, Henry A., - . 






57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Collins, Hiram S., 






5th Inf., . 


Bull Run, Va 


July 


21, 1861. 


Collins, John, 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Collins, Patrick, 1st Sergt., . 






9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Collins, Peter, 


•■ 




19th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Collins, Timothy, . 






21st Inf., . 


New Berne, N. C, 


March 


14, 1862. 


Collins, Timothy, . 






11th Inf., . 


Williamsburg, Va., . 


May 


5, 1862. 


Collis, Richard S., 






10th Inf., . 


Malvern Hill, Va., 


July 


1, 1862. 


Collister, Warren 0., Corp., 






25th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


May 


9, 1864. 


Collor, David, 






58th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


7, 1864. 


Colson, William H., Sergt., 






1st Inf., 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Comee, Alphonso, 






25th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



347 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Comey, Lawson, . 

Compass, Theodore, 1st Sergt., 

Conant, Ephraim L., . 

Conant, Lucius, . 

Conant, Seth W., . 

Condon, James, . 

Condon, Richard, Corp., 

Cone, William F., Corp., 

Conklin, Christopher C, Sergt., 

Conlan, James, . 

Conlan, James, 

Conley, Patrick, . 

Conley, Timothy, 

Conlon, Andrew, . 

Connell, Michael, . 

Conners, James, . 

Conners, John, 1st Sergt., 

Connery, Daniel, Sergt., 

Connor, John, 

Conway, Daniel, . 

Conway, Michael, 

Conway, Thomas, 

Cook, Albert,* 

Cook, Albert C, 

Cook, George B., 

Cook, Nelson, 

Cook, Silas N., 

Cook, William E., 

Cooley, John, Corp., . 

Cooley, John J., Sergt., 

Coolidge, Francis E., Corp., 

Coolidge, James P., . . 

Coombs, Edgar H., 2d Lieut., 

Coomes, Elias, 



42d Inf., 
20th Inf., 
18th Inf , 
58th Inf., 
58th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
40th Inf., 
2d Inf., 
32d Inf., 
52d Inf., 
28th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
38th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
31st Inf., 
56th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
29th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
42d Inf., 
28th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
34th Inf., 
27th Inf., 
10th Inf., 



Brashear City, La., 
Near Richmond, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Virginia, 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
St. Mary's, Fla., 
Cedar Mountain, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Port Hudson, La , 
Antietam, Md., . 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 

Wilderness, Va., 

Wilderness, Va., 

Wilderness, Va., 

Fredericksburg, Va., 

Winchester, Va., 

Fredericksburg, Va., 

Malvern Hill, Va., 

North Anna River, Va., . 

Sabine Cross Roads, Va., . 

Wilderness, Va., 

Gaines' Mill, Va., 

Petersburg, Va., 

Petersburg, Va., 

Brashear City, La., 

Gettysburg, Pa., 

Petersburg, Va., 

Manassas, Va., . 

Winchester, Va., 

Cold Harbor, Va., 

Fair Oaks, Va., . 



June 23, 1863. 

June 30, 1862. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

May 12, 1864. 

Sept. 30, 1864. 

June 27, 1862. 

May 5, 1864. 

May 5, 1864. 

Feb. 10, 1864. 

Aug. 9, 1862. 

June 18, 1864. 

June 15, 1863. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

June 27, 1862. 

May 5, 1864. 

May 12, 1864. 

May 7, 1864. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

Sept. 19, 1861. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

July 1, 1862. 

May 24, 1864. 

April 8, 1864. 

May 6, 1864. 

June 27, 1862. 
March 25, 1865. 

June 17, 1864. 

June 23, 1863. 

July 3, 1863. 

June 17, 1864. 

Aug. 30, 1862. 

Sept. 19, 1864. 

June 4, 1864. 

May 31, 1862. 



* Also reported as dying as prisoner at Mansfield, La., April 10, 1864. 



348 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Coope, Edward W., 




37th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Cooper, George, .... 




45th Inf., . 


Kinston, N. C, . 


Dec. 


14, 1862. 


Cooper, Thomas, .... 




19th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


10, 1864. 


Copeland, James, Sergt., 




56th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Copeland, Sidney, 




22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Copeland, Thomas, 




13th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Corbett, John, .... 




57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Corbin, Frank S., 1st Lieut., 




15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Corcoran, John, .... 




2d Inf., 


Cedar Mountain, Va., 


Aug. 


9, 1862. 


Cordwell, William, 2d Lieut., 
Corkery, Jeremiah, 




13th Inf., . 
16th Inf., . 


Opposite Fredericksburg, 

Va. 
Chancellorsville, Va., 


April 

May 


30, 1863. 
3, 1863. 


Corkery, Timothy, Sergt., . 




28th Inf., . 


Chantilly, Va., . 


Sept. 


1, 1862. 


Cormick, James, .... 




10th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


7, 1864. 


Cornnell, James, Corp., 




32d Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 


May 


10, 1864. 


Corrigan, Joseph, 




16th Inf., . 


Fair Oaks, Va., . 


June 


18, 1862. 


Corthell, Nelson F., Corp., . 




18th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Cossitt, George F., . . 




35th Inf., . 


Weldon Railway, Va., 


Aug. 


19, 1864. 


Costello, Thomas, 




30tb Inf., . 


Donaldsonville, La., . 


July 


13, 1863. 


Cotter, Maurice, Corp., 




9th Inf , . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Counihan, Edward, 




56th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


15, 1864. 


Courtis, A. Stacey, Sergt., . 




44th Inf., . 


Whitehall, N. C, 


Dec. 


16, 1862. 


Covey, Robert R., 




18th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Cowdin, George W., . . , 




26th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Cowdin, Robert J., Capt., . . 




56th Inf., . 


Shady Grove, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Cowdry, John, Sergt., . 




16th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


Cowles, Rollins, . 




27th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


2, 1864. 


Cowles, Silas, 




27th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


16, 1864. 


Cox, John, .... 




32d Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Cox, Richard, 




58th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Coyle, James, 




59th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Coyle, Patrick, 




15th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Craig, Harrison J., 




7th Batt. L. A., . 


Suffolk, Va., . . . 


Jan. 


30, 1863. 


Craig, Henry, 




54th Inf., . 


Fort Wagner, S. C, . 


July 


18, 1863. 


Crandall, Thomas J., Corp., 




37th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


1, 1864. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



349 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Crane, William D., Capt., 
Cranshaw, Richard, Corp., 
Crapo, Henry D., 
Crapo, Stephen E., 
Crawley, John H., 2d Lieut 
Cressey, Justin S., Sergt., 
Cressey, Leonard, 
Crittenden, Urbane H., 
Crocker, Charles A., Corp., 
Crocker, Enoch, . 
Crocker, Frederick B., . 
Crockett, William, Jr., Corp 
Cronan, Patrick, . 
Cronan, Patrick, . 
Cronin, Daniel, 
Cronin, John, 
Cronin, Patrick, Sergt., 
Cronin, Simon, 

Crooker, Marshall, Corp., 

Crosby, Isaiah, . 

Crosby, Robert, . 

Croscup, Melbourne, Corp., 

Croshier, George J., 

Cross, George W., 

Crosson, John, . » 

Crowell, Ariel P., Jr., Corp. 

Crowell, Benjamin, 

Crowell, Isaac B., 

Crowell, Jeremiah, 

Crowell, Philander, 

Crowell, Thomas G., Corp., 

Crowley, Daniel, . 

Cudworth, Edwin, 

Cue, Owen, . 



55th Inf., 
4th Inf., 
5th Batt. L 
58th Inf., 
56th Inf., 
21st Inf., 
20th Inf., 
37th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
11th Inf., 
37th Inf., 
33d Inf., 
20th Inf., 
2d Inf., 
37th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
19th Inf., 
24th Inf., 
23d Inf., 
10th Inf., 
IstH. A., 
24th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
9th Batt. 
22d Inf., 
48th Inf., 
13th Inf., 
1st Inf., 
1st Inf., 
20th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
20th Inf., 



A.,. 



A., 



Honey Hill, S. C, 
Port Hudson, La., 
Bottom's Bridge, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Chantilly, Va., . 
Antietam, Md., . 
Wilderness, Va., 
Poplar Spring Church, Va., 
Bull Run, Va., . 
Petersburg, Va., 
Lookout Mountain, Tenn., 
Near Richmond, Va., 
Resaca, Ga , 
Winchester, Va., 
Before Petersburg, Va , 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Near Richmond, Va., 
Drewry's Bluff, Va., 
Malvern Hill, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Tranter's Creek, N. C. 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Port Hudson, La., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Glendale, Va., . 
Blackburn's Ford, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 



Nov. 30, 1864. 

June 14, 1863. 

June 8, 1864. 

May 12, 1864. 

June 17, 1864. 

Sept. . 1, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

May 6, 1864. 

Sept. 30, 1864. 

July 21, 1861. 

June 21, 1864. 

Oct. 29, 1863. 

July 1, 1862. 

May 15, 1864. 

Sept. 19, 1864. 

June 22, 1864. 

May 12, 1864. 

Oct. 13, 1864. 

May 16, 1864. 

July 1, 1862. 

May 19, 1864. 

June 5, 1862. 

May 12, 1864. 

July 2, 1863. 

July 2, 1863. 

June 27, 1862. 

May 21, 1863. 

Aug. 30, 1862. 

June 30, 1862. 

July 18, 1861. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 
March 25, 1865. 

May 6, 1864. 



350 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Cullen, Michael, . 

Cullinan, John, . 

Cummings, Noah L., . 

Cummings, Stillman L., 

Cummings, Thomas, . 

Cunningham, John, Musician, 

Cunningham, Martin, . 

Curley, Simon, 

Curley, Thomas, . 

Curran, John H., . 

Curran, Patrick, . 

Currier, Oliver S., 

Currivan, William, 

Curry, Josephus, . 

Curry, Peter, 

Curry, Richard, Corp., 

Curtis, Albert O., . 

Curtis, Benjamin, 

Curtis, James, 

Cushing, David W., 

Cushing, Lysander F., 1st Lieut, 

Cushing, Patrick, . 

Cushing, Thomas J., . 

Cusick, John, 

Cutler, Charles D., 1st Sergt 

Cutler, Frederick A., . 

Cutler, George W., 

Cutter, Benjamin S., Sergt, 

Cutter, George S., 

Cutter, Granville A., . 

Cutting, Walter B., 

Dacy, Jeremiah, Corp., 

Daggett, Edward H., . 

Dailey, Milo H., . 



16th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
23d Inf., 
18th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
56th Inf., 
54th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
27th Inf., 
13th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
21st Inf., 
12th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
32d Inf., 
15th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
1st H. A., 
1st H. A., 
34th Inf., 
3d Cav., 
45th Inf., 
11th Batt. 



L. A. 



Fredericksburg, Va., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Ball's Bluff, Va., 
Gaines' Mill, Va , 
Drewry's Bluff, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
North Anna River, Va 
Antietam, Md., . 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Fort Wagner, S. C, 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Arrow-field Church, Va 
Manassas, Va., . 
Antietam, Md., . 
Petersburg, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Antietam, Md., . 
New Berne, N. C, 
Antietam, Md., . 
Petersburg, Va., 
Fair Oaks, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Ball's Bluff, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Stickney's Farm, Va., 
Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
Kinston, N. C, . 
Petersburg, Va., 



Dec. 14, 1862. 

June 27, 1862. 

May 6, 1864. 

Oct. 21, 1861. 

June 27, 1862. 

May 16, 1864. 

Aug. 30, 1862. 

Juno 27, 1862. 

May 24, 1864. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

June 27, 1862. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

May 6, 1864. 

July 18, 1863. 

June 18, 1862. 

May 9, 1864. 

Aug. 30, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

June 17, 1864. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

March 14, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

June 16, 1864. 

May 31, 1862. 

July 2, 1863. 

Oct. 21, 1861. 

June 16, 1864. 

June 16, 1864. 

May 19, 1864. 

Oct. 13, 1864. 

April 8, 1864. 

Dec. 14, 1862. 

June 19, 1864. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



351 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Dailey, Thomas, . 

Dailey, Thomas, . 

Dailey, William, . 

Daisy, John,* 

Daley, Daniel, 2d, 

Daley, John, 

Daley, Robert, 1st Sergt., 

Dallas, Alexander J., Capt. 

Dalord, Henry, . 

Dalton, Eleazer M. J., 

Dalton, Jeremiah, 2d, Corp 

Daly, Thomas H., Corp., 

Dame, John H., . 

Dame, Redford,f 

Damon, Henry, . 

Dana, Louis, . 

Dane, William, 

Dane, William, 

Dane, William W., 

Danforth, Edward S., . 

Daniels, Benjamin W., 

Daniels, George J., 

Daniels, Henry W., 1st Lieut., 

Daniels, Lowell, . 

Daniels, Milton F., 

Daniels, Myron M., 

Darling, Harvey A., Corp. 

Darracott, James R., 1st Lieut., 

Darrows, John N., Sergt., 

Davenport, Benjamin F., 

Davenport, Elisha C, . 

Davenport, Peleg B., . 

David, Edward, . 

Davis, Asa M., Corp., . 



2d Inf., 
16th Inf., 
56th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
21st Inf., 
30th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
59th Inf., 
1st H. A., 
22d Inf., 
1st Batt. L 
38th Inf., 
19th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
21st Inf., 
2d Inf., 
3d Cav., 
21st Inf., 
13th Inf., . 
1st Batt. L 
37th Inf., 
36th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
1st Cav., 
36th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
3d Cav., 
57th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
38th Inf., 
2d Cav., 



A.,. 



A., 



Cedar Mountain, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Fisher's Hill, Va., 
Malvern Hill, Va., 
Chancellor sville, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 



Charles City Cross Roads, 

Va. 
Port Hudson, La., 



Wilderness, Va., 
Chancellorsville, Va., 
New Berne, N. C, 
Winchester, Va., 
Port Hudson, La., 
Camden, N. C, . 
Antietam, Md., . 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Winchester, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Aldie, Va., . 
Wilderness, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Bull Run, 2d, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Winchester, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Port Hudson, La., 
Cedar Creek, Va., 



Aug. 9, 1862. 

July 2, 1863. 

May 12, 1864. 

Dec. 11, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

Sept. 22, 1864. 

July 1, 1862. 

May 3, 1863. 

June 17, 1864. 

June 22, 1864. 

June 27, 1862. 

June 30, 1862. 

May 25, 1863. 

May 6, 1864. 

May t 3, 1863. 
March 14, 1862. 

May 25, 1862. 

June 15, 1863. 

April 19, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

May 3, 1863. 

Sept. 19, 1864. 

May 12, 1864. 

May 18, 1864. 

June 17, 1863. 

May 6, 1864. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

Aug. 29, 1862. 

May 6, 1864. 

Sept. 19, 1864. 

May 6, 1864. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

June 14, 1863. 

Oct. 19, 1864. 



* Alias John Daily 



t Proved to have died as a prisoner. 



352 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Davis, Benjamin, . 






20th Inf., . 


Ball's Bluff, Va., 


Oct. 


21, 1861. 


Davis, Benjamin, . 






15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Davis, Benjamin, Capt., 






22d Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


10, 1864. 


Davis, Charles H., L, 






27th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


18, 1864. 


Davis, David, 






34th Inf., . 


Piedmont, Va., . 


June 


5, 1864. 


Davis, George A., Sergt., . 






15th Inf., . 


Bristoe Station, Va., . 


Oct. 


14, 1863. 


Davis, George F., 1st Lieut., 






4th Cav., . 


High Bridge, Va., 


April 


6, 1865. 


Davis, George R., 






11th Inf., . . ' 


Bladensburg, Md., 


Aug. 


13, 1861. 


Davis, James, 






37th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Davis, James, 






55th Inf., . 


James Island, S. C, . 


July 


2, 1864. 


Davis, James H., . 






15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Davis, John M 






33d Inf., . 


Lookout Mountain, Tenn., 


Oct. 


29, 1863. 


Davis, Levi, 






37th Inf., . 


Chaiiestown, Va., 


Aug. 


21, 1864. 


Davis, Lorenzo, . 






2d Inf., 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Davis, Luther M., 






49th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


May 


27, 1863. 


Davis, Orin L., 






' 15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Davis, P. Stearns, Col., 






39th Inf., . 


Before Petersburg, Va., 


July 


11, 1864. 


Davis, Robert, .... 






28th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Davis, Sumner A., Corp., . 






11th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Davis, William, . 






9th Inf., . 


Malvern Hill, Va., 


July 


1, 1862. 


Dawson, Anthony E., . 






28th Inf., . 


Virginia 


March 25, 1865. 


Day, Edwin E., Capt., 






10th Inf., . 


Fair Oaks, Va., . 


May 


31, 1862. 


Day, Henry, .... 






57th Inf., . 


Crater, Petersburg, Va., . 


July 


30, 1864. 


Day, John, 






20th Inf., . 


Virginia, .... 


June 


8, 1864. 


Day, Joshua G., . 






32d Inf., . 


Shady Grove Church, Va., 


May 


30, 1864. 


Day, Lawrence, . 






10th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Day, Samuel, 






9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Day, William, 






57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Dean, Charles F., 1st Sergt., 






7th Inf., . 


Marye's Heights, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Dean, Erastus L., 






39th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


8, 1864. 


Dean, Samuel D., 






39th Inf., . 


Before Petersburg, Va., 


March 31, 1865. 


Dean, Thomas F. C, . 






1st Cav., . 


Barber's Ford, Fla., . 


Feb. 


10, 1864. 


Dean, William L., 






16th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Dearborn, Charles A., Jr., Capt., 




32d Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



353 



List of Massachusetts Officers and. Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Bank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Decker, Clarkson H., . 
Deering, William, 
Deeiy, Patrick, . 
De Forrest, Harvey, . 
Degenering, Charles, . 
Dehon, Arthur, 1st Lieut., 
Deidee, Harris, 
Deland, Moses, 
Delaney, Franklin, 
Delaney, Joseph L., 
Delaney, Richard, 
Deming, Burton D., 1st Lieut., 
Denney, Robert, . 
Dennison, Patrick, 
Denny, Timothy, . 
Deon, Major, 
Derby, Charles H., Sergt., 
Derby, Edward M., 
Derby, Richard, Capt., 
Derraody, Patrick, 
De Rozier, Louis, . 
Deshon, Jason L., Sergt., 
Desmond, Bartholomew, 
Devereux, Thomas, 
Devine, Patrick, . 
Devlin, Henry, Corp., . 
Dexter, Ferdinand, Sergt., 
Dexter, Henry H., 
Dickinson, Francis, 
Dickinson, Frederick A., 
Dillingham, Albert A., 
Dillingham, William A., 
Dillon, Patrick, . 
Dillon, Thomas, . 



37th Inf., 
2d Inf., 
11th Inf., 
27th Inf., 
58th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
59th Inf., 
2d Co. S. S 
4th Batt. L 
25th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
49th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
18th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
36th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
31st Inf., 
28th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
2d Cav., 
15th Inf., 
13th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
56th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
2d Inf., 



A., 



Cold Harbor, Va., 
Averysboro', N. C, 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Baton Rouge, La., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Secessionvillc, S. C, 
Port Hudson, La., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Malvern Hill, Va., 
North Anna River, V 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Malvern Hill, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Petersburg, Va., 
Alexandria, La., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Ball's Bluff, Va., 
Dranesville, Va., 
Ball's Bluff, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Malvern Hill, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 



June 

March 

July 

June 

June 

Dec. 

May 

May 

Aug. 

June 

June 

May 

March 

June 

Aug. 

July 

May 

May 

Sept. 

July 

June 

May 

Sept. 

June 

May 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

Oct. 

Aug. 

July 

May 

May 

Sept. 



5, 1864. 
16, 1865. 

2, 1863. 

3, 1864. 

3, 1864. 
13, 1862. 

6, 1864. 

30. 1864. 

5, 1862. 
18, 1864. 
16, 1862. 
27, 1863. 

25. 1865. 
27, 1862. 
30, 1862. 

1, 1862. 
24, 1864. 
12, 1864. 
17, 1862. 

1, 1862. 

3, 1864. 

6, 1864. 
17, 1862. 
18, 1864. 

3, 1864. 
17, 1862. 

21, 1861. 

22, 1864. 
21, 1861. 
30, 1862. 

1, 1862. 
12, 1864. 
12, 1864. 
17, 1862. 



354 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Bane. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Dilworth, Dennis, 








27th Inf., . 


South West Creek, N. C, . 


March 8, 1865. 


Dinneen, James, . 








10th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Ya., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Doane, Eliphalet, . 








58th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


20, 1864. 


Doane, Everett W., 








58th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


April 


2, 1865. 


Docherki, William, 








20th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Dodge, Charles E., Sergt., 








9th Batt. L. A., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Dodge, George W., 








3d Cav., . 


Cedar Creek, Va., 


Oct. 


19, 1864. 


Dodge, Orrison J., 1st Sergt 


> 






22d Inf., . 


Malvern Hill, Va., 


July 


1, 1862. 


Dodge, Peter H., . 








22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Doberty, Daniel, . 








9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Doherty, James, . 








9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Doherty, John, 








28th Inf., . 


Deep Bottom, Va., 


Aug. 


14, 1864. 


Doherty, John D., Sergt., 








9th Inf., . 


Shady Grove Church, Va., 


May 


30, 1864. 


Doherty, Michael, 








11th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Doherty, Neal, . . , 








1st Cav., . 


Malvern Hill, Va., 


Aug. 


18, 1864. 


Doherty, Neil, 








28th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Dolan, John, 








1st Inf., 


Glendale, Va., . 


June 


30, 1862. 


Dolan, John, . . , 








2d Cav., . 


Fort Stevens, D. C, . 


July 


12, 1864. 


Dolan, Michael, . 








28th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Dolan, Michael, . . , 








9th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Doland, Leroy, . . , 








24th Inf., . 


Tranter's Creek, N. C, 


June 


5, 1862. 


Donahoe, Cornelius, . 








34th Inf., . 


Virginia, .... 


May 


15, 1864. 


Donahue, James, . 








20th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


11, 1862. 


Donahue, John, 2d, 








31st Inf., . 


Yellow Bayou, La., . 


May 


18, 1864. 


Donally, Thomas, . , 








45th Inf., . 


Whitehall, N. C, 


Dec. 


16, 1862. 


Donath, Herman, 1st Lieut. 








19th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Donavan, Patrick, 








22d Inf , . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


■5, 1864. 


Donavan, Timothy D., 








28th Inf., . 


Secessionville, S. C, . 


June 


16, 1862. 


Donelly, Patrick,* 








24th Inf., . 


Richmond, Va., . 


Oct. 


7, 1864. 


Donelly, Peter, 








28th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Donelly, Thomas, 








20th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


11, 1862. 


Donlan, Edward, . 








25th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


May 


9, 1864. 


Donnehoe, Philip, 








35th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Donnelly, John, . . , 








20th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


11, 1862. 



* Should read Connelly, Patrick. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



355 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Namb and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Donnelly, Michael J., Corp., 
Donnovan, John, . 
Donohoe, Cornelius, 
Donovan, Daniel, . 
Donovan, Patrick, 
Donovan, Thomas, 
Donovan, Timothy, 
Dorien, Christian, 
Doit, Luke, . 
Dougherty, Patrick, 
Douglass, Charles B., 
Dow, Albert W., . 
Dow, Charles H., 
Dow, James J., . 
Dowd, Henry M., 
Dowd, Solomon, . 
Downey, Thomas, 

Downey, Thomas, 

Downey, William, 

Doyle, John, 

Doyle, John, 

Doyle, Joseph, 

Doyle, Thomas, . 

Drake, Albert G., Corp 

Drake, James M., 1st Sergt 

Drake, Joseph, 

Drake, Otis P., 

Dresser, Edson T., Capt., 

Dresser, Ernest, . 

Drew, George, 3d, 

Drew, Herbert M., 
Drew, Horace, 
Driscoll, Jeremiah, 
Ducy, John, . 



28th Inf., 

10th Inf., 

16th Inf., 

7th Inf., 

12th Inf., 

18th Inf., 

28th Inf., 

32d Inf., 

3d Cav., 

21st Inf., 

3d Cav., 

57th Inf., 

23d Inf., 

24th Inf., 

32d Inf., 

49th Inf., 

20th Inf., 

20th Inf., 

2d Cav., 

3d Cav., 

34th Inf., 

27th Inf., 

19th Inf., 

35th Inf., 

33d Inf., 

27th Inf., 

58th Inf., 

57th Inf., 

6th Batt. L 

58th Inf., 

35th Inf., 

12th Inf., 

56th Inf., 

38th Inf., 



A, 



Manassas, Va., . 
Salem Heights, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Wilderness, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Secessionville, S. C, 
Petersburg, Va., 
Fisher's Hill, Va., 
Chantilly, Va., . 
Plains Store, La., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 

Deep Run, Va., . 

Laurel Hill, Va., 

Port Hudson, La., 

Fredericksburg, Va., 

Gettysburg, Pa , 

Dranesville, Va., ' 

Yellow Bayou, La., 

Strasburg, Va., . 

Drewry's Bluff, Va., 

Gettysburg, Pa., 

Before Petersburg, Va., 

Lookout Mountain, Tenn., 

New Berne, N. C, 

Cold Harbor, Va., 

Crater, Petersburg, Va 

Baton Rouge, La., 

Spotsylvania, Va., 

Antietam, Md., . 
Spotsylvania, .Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Port Hudson, La., 



Aug. 30, 1862. 

May 3, 1863. 

Aug. 29, 1862. 

May 6, 1864. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

June 16, 1862. 

June 18, 1864. 

Sept. 22, 1864. 

Sept. 1, 1862. 

Nov. 30, 1863. 

May 6, 1864. 

June 3, 1864. 

Aug. 16, 1864. 

May 12, 1864. 

May 27, 1863. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

July. 3, 1863. 

Feb. 22, 1864. 

May. 18, 1864. 

Oct. 13, 1864. 

May. 16, 1864. 

July 3, 1863. 

Aug. 19, 1864. 

Oct. 29, 1863. 

March 14, 1862. 

June 3, 1864. 

July 30, 1864. 

Aug. 5, 1862. 

May 12, 1864. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

May 12, 1864. 

June 23, 1864. 

May 27, 1863. 



356 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Bane. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Dudley, Ezra S., . 

Dudley, Joel D., Corp., 

Duffy, John, 

Duffy, Michael J., 

Duffy, Thomas, . 

Duffy, William, . 

Dugan, Dennis, . 

Dugree, Charles, . 

Dumasey, William F., 

Dumphee, Eli S., Sergt., 

Dumphrey, Martin, 

Dunakin, Henry, . 

Dunbar, John M., Corp., 

Dunbar, Seth T., . 

Duncan, Charles, . 

Dunham. William M., 1st Sergt 

Dunican, Patrick, 

Dunlap, James, 1st Lieut., 

Dunlap, Swinton, . 

Dunn, Edward P., 

Dunn, Gordon, 

Dunn, John, . 

Dunn, Samuel C, 

Dunn, William A., 

Dunning, John F., Capt., 

Dunning, Samuel J., . 

Duprey, Lewis, Sergt., 

Duran, Alonzo G., 

Durant, Bartholomew, 

Durgin, George E., Corp., 

Durgin, Leavitt C, Sergt., 

Duttling, August, 

Dutton, Myranda, 

Dwight, Charles C, Corp., 



19th Inf., 
4th Cav., 
4th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
2d Inf., 
16th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
2d Cav., 
3d Cav., 
59th Inf., 
27th Inf., 
37th Inf., 
7th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
7th Inf., 
32d Inf., 
59th Inf., 
59th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
37th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
36th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
27th Inf., 
21st Inf., 
12th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
IstH. A., 
2d Inf., 
20th Inf., 
33d Inf., 
28th Inf., 



Fredericksburg, Va. 
High Bridge, Va., 
Port Hudson, La., 
Malvern Hill, Va., 
Cedar Mountain, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Mount Zion Church, Va., 
Clinton, La., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Malvern Hill, Va., 
Salem Heights, Va., 
Laurel Hill, Va., 
Before Petersburg, Va. 
Wilderness, Va., 
Ball's Bluff, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Near Spotsylvania, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
New Berne, N. C, 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Manassas, Va., . 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Dallas, Ga., 
Secessionville, S. C, 



Dec. 


13, 


1862. 


April 


6, 


1865. 


June 


14, 


1863. 


July 


1. 


1862. 


Aug. 


9, 


1862. 


May 


6, 


1864. 


May 


12, 


1864. 


May 


18, 


1864. 


July 


6, 


1864. 


June 


3, 


1863. 


June 


17, 


1864. 


June 


17, 


1864. 


May 


6, 


1864. 


June 


12, 


1864. 


July 


1, 


1862. 


May 


3, 


1863. 


May 


12, 


1864. 


July 


30, 


1864. 


May 


6, 


1864. 


Oct. 


21, 


1861. 


May 


6, 


1864. 


May 


12, 


1864. 


May 


14, 


1864. 


June 


3, 


1864. 


June 


27, 


1862. 


March 14, 


1862. 


June 


2, 


1864. 


Sept. 


17, 


1862. 


Aug. 


30 


1862. 


May 


19 


1864. 


July 


3 


1863. 


July 


3 


1863. 


May 


25 


1864. 


June 


16 


1862. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN" ACTION. 



357 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Corp 



Dwinell, Charles H., 
Dwyer, John, 
Dwyer, Thomas, . 
Dwyer, Timothy, . 
Dyer, Looman H., 
Dyer, Michael, 
Dyer, Nathaniel H., 
Dyson, Reuben, . 
Eacott, Henry, 
Eames, David B., Sergt 
Eames, Warren F., 
Earle, Alfred C, Sergt 
Earley, Patrick, Sergt. 
Eastman, Amos S., 
Eastwood, Francis EL, 
Eaton, Calvin J., . 
Eaton, Eugene M., 
Eaton, John L., . 
Eaton, Joseph, 
Eddy, Luther E., 
Edgar, Patrick J., 
Edgerly, William, 
Edmands, Consider, 
Edson, Levi, 
Edwards, George P., 
Edwards, Orrin, . 
Edwards, William, 
Egleston, Charles T., 
Eigenbrodt, Charles S 
Einhorn, Carl W. J., 
Ela, Elisha P. C, 
Ela, William H., . 
Elder, Robei.t, 
Eldridge, Ebenezer, 



Sergt 



Corp 



Capt 



29th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
2d Inf., 
16th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
42d Inf., 
19th Inf., 
32d Inf., 
-20th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
21st Inf., 
22d Inf., 
15th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
1st Cav., 
25th Inf., 
31st Inf., . 
58th Inf., 
54th Inf., 
11th Inf., 
27th Inf., 
37th Inf., 
1st Inf., 
5th Cav., 
27th Inf., 
2d Cav., 
20th Inf., 
39th Inf., 
2d Inf., 
37th Inf , 
58th Inf., 



Campbell Station, Tenn., . 
Ball's Bluff, Va., 
Fair Oaks, Va , . 
Fredericksburg, Va., . 
Cedar Mountain, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Antietam, Md., . 
La Fourche' Crossing, La., 
White Oak Swamp, Va., . 
Petersburg, Va., 
Ball's Bluff, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Malvern Hill, Va., 
Antietam, Md , . 

Laurel Hill, Va., 

Gettysburg, Pa., 

Gaines' Mill, Va., 

Aldie, Va., . 

Drewry's Bluff, Va., 

Yellow Bayou, La., 

Wilderness, Va., 

Fort Wagner, S. C, 

Manassas, Va., . 

Cold Harbor, Va., 

Petersburg, Va., 

Gettysburg, Pa., 

Baylor's Farm, Va., 

Petersburg, Va., 

Halltown, Va., . 

Wilderness, Va., 

Spotsylvania, Va., 

Gettysburg, Pa., 

Cold Harbor, Va., 

Spotsylvania, Va., 



Nov. 16, 1863. 

Oct. 21, 1861. 

June 1, 1862. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

Aug. 9, 1862. 

July 3, 1863. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

June 21, 1863. 

June 30, 1862. 

June 22, 1864. 

Oct. 21,1861. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

July 1,1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

May 10, 1864. 

July 4, 1863. 

June 27, 1862. 

June 17, 1863. 

May 16, 1864. 

May 18, 1864. 

May 6, 1864. 

July 18, 1863. 

Aug. 29, 1862. 

June 3, 1864. 

April 2, 1865. 

July 2, 1863. 

June 15, 1864. 

June 18, 1864. 

Aug. 25, 1864. 

May 6, 1864. 

May 18, 1864. 

July 3, 1863. 

June 5, 1864. 

May 12, 1864. 



358 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Eldridge, Henry R., Sergt., 

Eldridge, Nathan, 

Eldridge, William P., Sergt 

Elliott, Benjamin R., 

Ellick, Eli A., 

Elliott, Joseph, 

Ellis, George, Corp., 

Ellis, George H., . 

Ellis, George W., . 

Ellis, Joel E., 

Elms, Charles H., 

Emerson, Albert B., 

Emerson, Charles H., 

Emerson, George, 

Emerson, Josiah G., 

Emerson, Stephen G., 

Emerson, William L., 

Emmons, Marcus, 

Engle, George, 

Engley, George, . 

Eppler, Joseph, . 

Erickson, Christopher, 1st Lieut 

Erskins, George B., 

Estes, Albert S., . 

Estes, James, 

Estes, William H., 

Evans, Albert, 

Evans, Henry, 

Evans, Richard, . 

Evans, William A., 

Everson, George E., Corp., 

Everson, William S., 

Ewer, Barnabas, Jr., Maj., 

Ewing, Albert S., 



31st Inf., 
58th Inf., 
32d Inf., 
15th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
3d Cav., 
10th Inf., 
36th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
11th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
2d Inf., 
2d Cav., 
10th Inf., 
1st Inf., 
22d Inf., 
21st Inf., 
59th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
25th Inf., 
9th Batt. L 
32d Inf., 
13th Inf., 
1st H. A., 
10th Inf., 
54th Inf., 
1st Inf., 
20th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
59th Inf., 
54th Inf., 
58th Inf., 
57th Inf., 



A., 



Brashear City, La., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Petersburg, Va., 
Alexandria, La., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Jackson, Miss., . 
Antietam, Md., . 
Antietam, Md., . 
Wilderness, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Winchester, Va., 
Opequon, Va., . 
Wilderness, Va., 
Chancellorsville, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Bethesda Church, Va 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Laurel Hill, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Fort Wagner, S. C, 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
James Island, S. C, 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 



June 


26, 


1863. 


May 


12, 


1864. 


July 


2, 


1863. 


Sept. 


17, 


1862. 


June 


17, 


1864. 


May 


1, 


1864. 


May 


12, 


1864. 


July 


11, 


1863. 


Sept. 


17, 


1862. 


Sept. 


17, 


1862. 


May 


6, 


1864. 


May 


5, 


1864. 


May 


25, 


1862. 


Sept. 


19, 


1864. 


May 


12, 


1864. 


May 


3, 


1863. 


June 


18, 


1864. 


June 


2, 


1864. 


May 


13, 


1864. 


Dec. 


14, 


1862. 


June 


18, 


1864. 


July 


2, 


1863. 


May 


9, 


1864. 


Aug. 


30, 


1862. 


May 


19, 


1864. 


May 


31, 


1862. 


July 


18, 


1863. 


July 


2, 


1863. 


May 


7, 


1864. 


May 


18, 


1864. 


June 


17, 


1864. 


July 


16, 


1863. 


June 


3, 


1864. 


May 


6, 


1864. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



359 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date, 



Fairbanks, Frank H., . 
Fairbanks, Henry A., Corp., 
Fairbanks, Hollis H., 
Fairbanks, Luman F., 
Fairfield, James N., 
Fales, Henry M., Corp 
Fall, Edwin H., . 
Fall, Isaac C, 
Farley, Philip, 
Farmer, Edward, Sergt, 
Farmer, William H., 
Farmloe, George H., 
Farnsworth, Franklin 
Farrar, James M., 
Farrell, Robert, . 
Farrell, Thomas, . 
Farrington, George, 
Farrington, John E., 
Farwell, George G., Corp., 

Faunce, Leander W. 

Faxon, Horatio N., 

Fay, Benjamin F., 

Fay, Elisha W., . 

Fay, Horatio L., . 

Featherson, Thomas, Sergt 

Fee, William, 

Felker, Samuel 0., 

Fellows, Horatio, 

Fenn, Henry, 

Fenno, Frank M., 

Ferguson, Miles C, 

Fernald, Robert, . 

Ferrier, George W., 

Ferrin, George A., 



15th Inf., . 

20th Inf., . 

13th Inf., . 

16th Inf., . 

38th Inf., . 

57th Inf., . 

32d Inf., . 

1st Cav., . 

11th Inf., . 

1st H. A., . 

34th Inf., . 

28th Inf., . 

15th Inf., . 

33d Inf., . 

9th Inf., . 

57th Inf., . 

1st H. A., . 
2d Inf., 

32d Inf., . 

35th Inf., . 

20th Inf., . 
2d Inf., 

10th Inf., . 

20th Inf., . 

11th Inf., . 

19th Inf., . 

39th Inf., . 

19th Inf., . 

9th Batt. L. 

36th Inf., . 

28th Inf., . 
12th Inf., . 
2d Cav., . 
37th Inf., . 



A., 



Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Wilderness, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Port Hudson, La., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Aldie, Va., . 
Mine Run, Va., . 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
JJew Market, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Wauhatchie, Tenn , 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Antietam, Md., . 
Cedar Mountain, Va 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Antietam, Md., . 
Dranesville, Va., 
Winchester, Va., 



May 


31, 1862. 


May 


6, 1864. 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


July 


2, 1863. 


June 


1, 1863. 


May 


6, 1864. 


July 


2, 1863. 


June 


17, 1863. 


Nov. 


27, 1863. 


May 


19, 1864. 


May 


15, 1864. 


May 


7, 1864. 


May 


31, 1862. 


Oct. 


29, 1863. 


June 


27, 1862. 


May 


6, 1864. 


May 


19, 1864. 


July 


3, 1863. 


June 


18, 1864. 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Aug. 


9, 1862. 


May 


31, 1862. 


July 


3, 1863. 


July 


2, 1863. 


June 


7, 1864. 


May 


10, 1864. 


June 


6, 1864. 


July 


2, 1863. 


May 


6, 1864. 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Feb. 


22, 1864. 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 



360 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action - 


- Continued. 


Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Ferris, John, .... 




9th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


8, 1864. 


Ferris, John J., 1st Lieut., . 




19th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Fessenden, James 0., . 




21st Inf., . 


New Berne, N. C, 


March 14, 1862. 


Fiedler, Paul E., Corp., 




13th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Field, Ebenezer, .... 




1st Inf., 


Blackburn's Ford, Va., 


July 


18, 1861. 


Field, Edwin 




13th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


1, 1863. 


Field, John W., Sergt., 




37th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Field, Lyman, Jr., . . 




16th Inf., . 


Williamsburg Road, Va., . 


June 


18, 1862. 


Finegan, Patrick, 




15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Finn, James A., Sergt., 




28th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Finn, Nicholas, . 




57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Finnerty, Bartholomew, 




9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Finnerty, Francis, 




32d Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Finninly, Henry, . 




1st Inf., . 


Glendale, Va., . 


June 


30, 1862. 


Fisher, Charles F., 




25th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Fisher, John E., . 




29th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Fisher, Rufus F., . 




33d Inf., . 


Wauhatchie, Tenn., . 


Oct. 


29, 1863. 


Fisk, Charles H., . 




12th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Fisk, Ebenezer, Sergt., 




29th Inf., . 


Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Fisk, Howard 0., 




IstCav., . 


Aldie, Va., .... 


June 


17, 1863. 


Fisk, John S., 




13th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


1, 1863. 


Fiske, Edgar A., Sergt., 




13th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Fiske, Frederick, . 




18th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Fiske, John W., 1st Lieut., . 




58th Inf., . 


Poplar Spring Church, Va., 


Sept. 


30, 1864. 


Fiske, Jonathan 0., 




25th Inf., . 


New Berne, N. C, 


MarcL 


14, 1862. 


Fitch, Albert, Corp., . 




2d Inf., 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Fitch, J. Arthur, 1st Lieut., 




40th Inf., . 


Chapin's Farm, Va., . 


Sept. 


30, 1864. 


Fitzgerald, Garrett, 




49th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


May 


27, 1863. 


Fitzgerald, Gerald, 1st Lieut., 




2d Inf., . 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Fitzgerald, Michael, 




9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Fitzgerald, Michael, 




1st H. A., . 


Ny River, Va., . 


May 


19, 1864. 


Fitzgerald, Patrick, 




28th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6fl864. 


Fitzgerald, Thomas, Sergt., 




9th Inf., . 


* 

Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Fitzpatrick, Matthew T., 




29th Inf., . 


Big Bethel, Va., 


June 


10, 1861. 



]v:ass. officers and soldiers killed in action. 



36 L 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action - 


- Continued. 


Name and 


Kank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Fitzpatrick, Michael, 


. 


59th Inf., . 


Before Petersburg, Va., 


July 


7, 1864. 


Fitzpatrick, Michael, 


. 


25th Inf , . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Fitzpatrick, Thomas, 


. 


22d Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 


May 


10, 1864. 


Fizzell, John, Sergt., 


• • a i • 


56th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Flaherty, Nicholas C 


, 1st Lieut., 


9th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Flanagan, James, 


„ 


19th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Flanagan, John, . 


• • • • 


9th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Flanagan, William, 


. 


57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Flannigan, William, 


. 


18th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Fleet, George E., . 


. 


1st H. A., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


22, 1864. 


Fleming, James, . 


. 


2d Inf., 


Cedar Mountain, Va., 


Aug. 


9, 1862. 


Fleming, Thomas, 


• • • • 


28th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Fletcher, Albert W., 


. 


53d Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Fletcher, David, . 


• • • • 


23d Inf., . 


Whitehall, N. C, 


Dec. 


16, 1862. 


Fletcher, George F., 


Corp., . 


15th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Fletcher, James B., Corp., . 


15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Fletcher, John H., Corp 


26th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Flint, Francis S., . 


• • • • 


11th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Flint, James T., . 


. 


16th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


Flint, William, . 


. 


21st Inf., . . 


New Berne, N. C, 


March 14, 1862. 


Floyd, Benjamin, 


. 


22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Flynn, Cornelius J., 


. 


16th Inf., . 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Flynn, Daniel, 


. 


57th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


17, 1864. 


Flynn, John, 


. 


9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Flynn, Joseph, 


. 


9th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Flynn, Martin, 


. 


18th Inf., . 


Bethesda Church, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Flynn, Michael, . 


• * • .• 


15th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Flynn, Michael, . 


• • • o 


15th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Flynn, Peter, 


• • • 


13th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . . . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Flynn, William, . 


• • • • 


22d Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Flynn, William H., 


2d Lieut., 


28th Inf., . 


Bull Run, 2d, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Fogg, Alexander R. 


■ • • • 


22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Fogg, Elisha H., . 


. 


1st Inf., 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


Fogg, Lucian, Corp. 

7 


, • • • • 


10th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 



362 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action - 


- Continued. 


Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Foley, James, 








9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Foley, John, . 








9th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Foley, Maurice, . 








12th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Foley, Michael, Jr., 








16th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Foley, Patrick, . . , 








28th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Foley, William, . 








28th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Foley, William, . 








34th Inf., . 


New Market, Va., 


May 


15, 1864. 


Follansbee, John T., . 








37th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., . 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Foos, William, Corp., . 








34th Inf., . 


New Market, Va., 


May 


15, 1864. 


Forbes, James, 








31st Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Ford, Charles E., 








4th Cav., . 


Palatka, Fla., 


Aug. 


2, 1864. 


Ford, John J., 2d Lieut.,* 








4th H. A., . 


Deep Run, Va., . 


Aug. 


16, 1864. 


Ford, Joseph, 








9th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Ford, Robert H., . 








26th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Ford, Samuel, 








54th Inf., . 


Fort Wagner, S. C, . 


July 


18, 1863. 


Ford, William A., Corp., 








24th Inf., . 


Deep Run, Va., . 


Aug. 


16, 1864. 


Forrest, Gordon, Sergt., 








1st Inf., 


Blackburn's Ford, Va., 


July 


18, 1861. 


Forsaith, John, . 








19th Inf., . 


Jerusalem Plank Road, Va., 


June 


22, 1864. 


Forsyth, John, Jr., Sergt., 








16th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Fortin, Joseph, 








57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Foss, Benjamin F., 


• 






11th Inf., . 


Bull Run, Va., . 


July 


21, 1861. 


Foss, Charles H., . 








56th Inf., . 


Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Foss, John C, 








2d Inf., 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Foss, John L., 








19th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Foster, Charles A., 








20th Inf., . 


Virginia 


June 


1, 1862. 


Foster, Charles G., 








15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Foster, Irving, 








39th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


18, 1864. 


Foster, James L., 








52d Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


16, 1863. 


Foster, John, 








6th Batt. L. A., 


Baton Rouge, La., 


Aug. 


5, 1862. 


Foster, John A., . 








IstH. A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


Foster, Richard M., Corp., 








54th Inf., . 


Honey Hill, S. C, . 


Nov. 


30, 1864. 


Foster, Silas P., . 








2d Inf., 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Fowler, Charles A., 








27th Inf., . 


Rocky Hoc Creek, N. C, . 


March 24, 1863. 


Fowler, William T., Sergt., 








23d Inf., . 


Whitehall, N. C, 


Dec. 


16, 1862. 



Killed in 24th Inf. before receiving commission in 4th H. A. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



363 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Namb and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Fox, Arthur L., . 






34th Inf., . 


Piedmont, Va., . 


June 


5, 1864. 


Fox, Owen, .... 






2d Cav., . 


Mount Zion Church, Va., . 


July 


6, 1864. 


Frahm, Louis, 






39th Inf., . 


Weldon Railroad, Va., 


Aug. 


18, 1864. 


Frames, Murdock, 






2d Inf., 


Cedar Mountain, Va., 


Aug. 


9, 1862. 


Francis, Joseph, . 






1st Inf., 


Williamsburg, Va., . 


May 


5, 1862. 


Francis, Joseph, . 






59th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Frazer, John, 






15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Frazier, George, . 






40th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


1, 1864. 


Frederick, Eugene A., 






56th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


17, 1864. 


Freeman, George E., Sergt., 






36th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Freeman, Isaac S. D., . 






16th Inf., . 


Williamsburg Road, Va., . 


June 


18, 1862. 


Freeman, John B., Corp., . 






1st Cav., . 


Aldie, Va., .... 


June 


17, 1863. 


Freeman, Michael, 






37th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Freeman, William F., . 






16th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


Freidenberg, Nathan, . 






20th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


23, 1864. 


French, Benjamin, Jr., 






11th Inf., . 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


2, 1863. 


French, Jesse B., . 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Fretts, Joseph C, Corp., 






15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Friedrichson, Ludwig, . 






20th Inf., . 


Deep Bottom, Va., . 


Aug. 


14, 1864. 


Frink, William A., 






25th Inf., . 


Drewry's Bluff, Va., . 


May 


16, 1864. 


Frost, Aaron B., . 






12th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Fry, AVilliam L., . 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Fryer, Patrick, 






21st Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Fuller, Arthur B., Chap., 






16th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


11, 1862. 


Fuller, Frank B., . 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Fuller, Thomas, Corp., 






18th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Fuller, William H., . 






27th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Fulton, Richard, . 






37th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Funk, Luther, 






49th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


May 


27, 1863. 


Furbur, Charles, . 






2d Inf., 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Furbush, Walter A., . 






53d Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


2, 1863. 


Furfey, Richard, . 






9th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Furnald, Thomas, 1st Sergt 


■> 




15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., ... 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Gage, Edmond C, 






1st H. A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 



364 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action - 


- Continu 


ed. 


Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Gage, M. Gardner, Corp., . 






34th Inf., . 




Benyville, Va., . 


Oct. 


18, 1863. 


Gaglehan, Patrick, 






20th Inf., . 




Ball's Bluff, Va., 


Oct. 


21 


1861. 


Galacar, Charles, . 






22d Inf., . 




Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


10 


1864. 


Gale, Josiah B., . 






12th Inf., 




Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17 


1862. 


Gallagher, John, . 






IstH. A., 




Petersburg, Va., 


June 


22 


1864. 


Gallagher, Owen, Corp., 






9th Inf., . 




Malvern Hill, Va., 


July 


1 


1862. 


Galletly, Frederick A., 






23d Inf., . 




Before Petersburg, Va., . 


Aug. 


5 


1864. 


Galligan, James, . 






20th Inf., . 




Ball's Bluff, Va., 


Oct. 


21 


1861. 


Gallop, Leroy R., 






36th Inf., . 




Campbell's Station, Tenn., 


Nov. 


16 


1863. 


Gamage, Henry R., 






26th Inf., . 




Opequon, Va 


Sept. 


19 


1864. 


Gambol, George, .... 






24th Inf., . 




Before Petersburg, Va., 


Sept. 


24 


1864. 


Gamrell, Charles S., 






54th Inf., . 




James Island, S. C, . 


July 


16 


1863. 


Gamwell, John M., Corp., . 






49th Inf., 




Port Hudson, La., 


May 


27 


1863. 


Ganley, John H., . 






9th Inf., 




Malvern Hill, Va., 


July 


1 


1862. 


Gantner, Eugene, 






25th Inf., 




Roanoke Island, N. C, 


Feb. 


8 


1862. 


Gardner, Edward, 






10th Inf., . 




P'airOaks, Va., . 


May 


31 


1862. 


Gardner, Frank, . 






1st H. A., 




Ny River, Va., . 


May 


19 


1864. 


Gardner, Horace, 1st Sergt., 






21st Inf., 




Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30 


1864. 


Garey, Patrick, 






11th Inf., 




Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3 


1863. 


Garfield, Nathan B., Corp., 






25th Inf., 




Arrowfield Church, Va., . 


May 


9 


1864. 


Garlick, Evalyn A., 






21st Inf., 




Chatitilly, Va., . 


Sept. 


1 


1862. 


Garlick, Reuben A., 






3d Cav., . 




Opequon, Va., . 


Sept. 


19 


1864. 


Garrity, John, 






9th Inf., 




Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27 


1862. 


Gaskell, John N., 






57th Inf., 




Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


1 


1864. 


Gaskin, George, . 






24th Inf., 




Darby town Road, Va., 


Oct. 


13 


1864. 


Gaskins, "William B., . 






1st Inf., 




Fair Oaks, Va., . 


June 


25 


1862. 


Gassett, Thomas R., 






13th Inf., 




Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17 


1862. 


Gatchell, Moses W., Capt., . 






15th Inf., 




Ball's Bluff, Va., 


Oct. 


21 


1861. 


Gateley, John, 






3d Cav., 




Opequon, Va., . 


Sept. 


19 


1864. 


Gates, Hiram, 






25th Inf., 




Arrowfield Church, Va., . 


May 


9 


1864. 


Gault, Samuel, Capt., . 






38th Inf., 




Bisland, La., 


April 


13 


1863. 


Gaylord, James H., Sergt., . 






34th Inf., 




Stickney's Farm, Va., 


Oct. 


13 


1864. 


Gendron, James, . 






37th Inf., 




Opequon, Va., . 


Sept. 


19 


, 1864. 


Gentsch, Francis, 






35th Inf., 




Poplar Spring Church, Va., 


Sept. 


30 


1864. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



365 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



3eorge, Henry 0., 

Gterrish, Edward, . 

Getchell, Lewis G., 

Gibbons, Barney, 

Gibbons, John, 

Gibbs, William, . 

Gibson, Charles H., 

Gibson, Lorenzo D., 

Gibson, Seth, 

Gifford, Robert, . . ' . 

Gilbert, George B., 

Gilbert, Harvey, . 

Gilbert, Lyman H., 

Gilbert, William, . 

Gilbreth, Samuel G., 1st Lieut., 

Gile, Andrew J., . 

Gilfoy, Francis, . 

Gill, Austin, .... 

Gill, Elijah B., Jr., 2d Lieut., 

GiU, John H., 

Gill, Michael, . . 

Gillespie, James, Sergt., 

Gillespie, John E., 

Gillin, Michael, . 

Gillis, William, . 

Gillon, Patrick, . . 

Gillson, James F., 

Gilman, Charles W., . 

Gilmore, David N., 

Gilson, Albert, 

Gird, Joseph W., Capt., 

Gleason, Edward C, . 

Gleason, Jesse D., 

Gleason, John, 



35th Inf., . 
21st Inf., . 
1st Inf., 
28th Inf., . 
28th Inf., . 
55th Inf., . 
23d Inf., . 
27th Inf., . 
7th Inf., . 
61st Inf., . 
2d H. A., . 
34th Inf., . 
36th Inf., . 
15th Inf., . 
1st Co. S. S., . 
35th Inf., . 
28th Inf., . 
24th Inf., . 
1st Inf., 
35th Inf., . 
18th Inf., . 
28th Inf., . 
56th Inf., . 
57th Inf., . 
9th Inf., . 
16th Inf., . 
9th Batt. L. A., 
35th Inf., . 
34th Inf., . 
2d Inf., 
57th Inf., . 
20th Inf., . 
36th Inf , . 
9th Inf , . 



Antietam, Md., . 

Chantilly, "Va., . 

Oak Grove, Va., 

Chantilly, Va 

Secessionville, S. C, . 

Honey Hill, S. C, . 

On Steamer " Fawn," 

Goldsboro', N. C, 

Marye's Heights, Va., 

Petersburg, Va., . 

Kinston, N. C, . 

Piedmont, Va., . 

Poplar Spring Church, Va., 

Near Warrenton, Va., 

Petersburg, Va., 

Antietam, Md., . 

Deep Bottom, Va., 

Tranter's Creek, N. C, 

Bull Run, Va., . . 

Crater Petersburg, Va., 

Manassas, Va 

Deep Bottom, Va., . 

Before Petersburg, Va., 

Wilderness, Va., 

Wilderness, Va., 

Chancellorsville, Va., . 

Gettysburg, Pa., 

Jones' House, near Peters- 
burg, Va. 
New Market, Va., 

Cedar Mountain, Va., 

Wilderness, Va., 

Virginia, . 

Before Petersburg, Va., 

Gaines' Mill, Va., 



Sept. 17, 1862. 

Sept. 1, 1862. 

June 25, 1862. 

Sept. 1, 1862. 

June 16, 1862. 

Nov. 30, 1864. 

Sept. 13, 1864. 

Dec. 17, 1862. 

May 3, 1863. 

April 2, 1865. 
March 8, 1865. 

June 5, 1864. 

Sept. 30, 1864. 

Oct. 30, 1863. 

June 18, 1864. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

Aug. 14, 1864. 

June 5, 1862. 

July 21, 1861. 

July 30, 1864. 

Aug. 30, 1862. 

July 27, 1864. 

June 23, 1864. 

May 6, 1864. 

May 5, 1864. 

May 3, 1863. 

July 2, 1863. 

Dec. 27, 1864. 

May 15, 1864. 

Aug. 9, 1862. 

May 6, 1864. 

July 30, 1862. 

July 25, 1864. 

June 27, 1862'. 



366 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and. Soldiers killed in Action - 


- Continued. 


Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Gleason, Josiah, . 






21st Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va , 


May 


12, 1864. 


Gleason, Samuel, . 






25th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Gleason, Thomas S., . 






10th Inf., . 


Fair Oaks, Va., . 


May 


31, 1862. 


Glennen, Charles, Sergt., 






11th Inf., . 


Locust Grove, Va., . 


Nov. 


27, 1863. 


Glidden, Jasper A., 2d Lieut., 






3d Cav., 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Glines, Henry A., 






29th Inf., . 


Before Petersburg, Va., 


Sept. 


21, 1864. 


Glover, Alfred R., 1st Lieut., 






53d Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Glover, Henry, 






27th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Glover, Henry B., 






11th Inf., . 


Williamsburg, Va., . 


May 


5, 1862. 


Glover, Walter S., 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Glynn, Thomas J., 






9th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Goddard, John D. B., Capt., 






4th Cav., . 


High Bridge, Va., 


April 


6, 1865. 


Godfrey, Anson W., . 






1st H. A., . 


Before Petersburg, Va., 


Oct. 


27, 1864. 


Goetz, John H., . 






34th Inf., . 


New Market, Va., 


May 


15, 1864. 


Goflf, Charles H., . 






15th Inf., . 


Ball's Bluff, Va., 


Oct. 


21, 1861. 


Goldie, Peter T., . 






11th Inf., . 


Before Petersburg, Va., 


Sept. 


13, 1864. 


Golding, James H., 






22d Inf., . 


Malvern Hill, Va., 


July 


1, 1862. 


Goode, John, 






22d Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 


May 


10, 1864. 


Goodhue, Frederick C, 






32d Inf., . 


Shady Grove Church, Va., 


May 


30, 1864. 


Goodnow, Elisha P., . 






IstH. A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


Goodwin, Charles, Corp., . 






2d Cav., . 


Leesburg, Va., . 


April 


20, 1864. 


Goodwin, Charles, 






20th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Goodwin, Horace, 






35th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Goodwin, Horatio E., . 






2d Inf., 


Atlanta, Ga., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Goodwin, James, .... 






7th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Goodwin, John 






IstH. A., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


20, 1864. 


Goodwin, John, Jr., 2d Lieut., 






23d Inf., . 


Roanoke Island, N. C, 


Feb. 


8, 1862. 


Goodwin, Richard C, Capt., 






2d Inf., . 


Cedar Mountain, Va., 


Aug. 


9, 1862. 


Goonan, James, . 






28th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Gordon, Charles F., 






16th Inf., . 


Glendale, Va., . 


June 


30, 1862. 


Gordon, George W , 2d Lieut., . 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Gordon, James, .... 






1st H. A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


Gordon, Joseph, . 






9th Inf., . 


Mechanicsville, Va., . 


June 


26, 1862. 


Gorman, Michael, 






10th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



367 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Gormley, Peter, . 






58th Inf., . 


Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Gorn, Mitchell, 






38th Inf., . 


New Market, Va., 


May 


15, 1864. 


Gorse, Joseph, 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Goss, Charles, Capt., 






21st Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


17, 1864. 


'Goss, John R., 






32d Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Gott, Pearl S., 






15th Inf., . 


Island No. 10, Miss. River, 


April 


7, 1862. 


Gould, George W., 






25th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Gould, Harvey S., 






IstH. A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


Gould, Henry, . , 






28th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Gould, John B., . . 






26th Inf., . 


Opequon, Va 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Gould, Lorenzo D., 






52d Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Gould, Samuel S., , 






13th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Goulding, Henry, 2d, 






25th Inf., . 


Proctor's Creek, Va., 


May 


14, 1864. 


Goulding, Joseph M., 






35th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Gove, Jesse A., Col., 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Gower, William D., 






26th Inf., . 


Opequon, Va., . 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Grady, John, 






15th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Grady, Matthew, . 






33d Inf., . 


Wauhatchie, Tenn., . 


Oct. 


29, 1863. 


Grafton, J. Ingersoll, Capt., 




2d Inf., 


Averysborough, N. C, 


March 


16, 1865. 


Graham, Edward, 1st Lieut., 




IstH. A.,.. 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


Graham, James, 2d Lieut., . 




25th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., . . 


June 


3, 1864. 


Granet, Clement, 1st Li 


eut, 




58th Inf., . 


Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Granger, Henry C, 






11th Inf., . 


Williamsburg, Va., . 


May 


5, 1862. 


Grant, Alexander, 






19th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Granville, John, . 






3d Cav., . 


Opequon, Va., . 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


G rattan, Vincent 0., 






28th Inf., . 


Hatcher's Run, Va., . 


March 25, 1865. 


Graves, Horace, . 






19th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Gray, Charles H., 






23d Inf., . 


New Berne, N. C, 


March 


14, 1862. 


Gray, Franklin S., 






58th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Gray, George H., . 






6th Inf , . 


Carrsville, Va., . 


May 


15, 1863. 


Gray, Henry, Sergt., 






28th Inf., . 


Chantilly, Va., . 


Sept. 


1, 1862. 


Gray, Samuel B., 






24th Inf., . 


Deep Bottom, Va., 


Aug. 


16, 1864. 


Greadon, Andrew, 






1st Inf., 


Chancellors ville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Grealish, Patrick, 






35th Inf., . 


Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30, 1864. 



368 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action - 


— Continued. 


Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Greaney, Charles, 






9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Grece, John D 






25th Inf., . 


Drewry's Bluff, Va., . 


May 


16, 1864. 


Green, Augustus, 






22d Inf., . 


Bethesda Church, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Green, Daniel, Corp., . 






11th Inf., . 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Green, John, 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Green, Lewis C 






54th Inf., . 


Olustee, Fla., 


Feb. 


20, 1864. 


Green, Stephen W., 






2d Cav., . 


Cedar Creek, Va., 


Oct. 


19, 1864. 


Greenleaf, Ruel W., Corp., . 






30th Inf., . 


Donaldsonville, La., . 


July 


13, 1863. 


Greenough, Robert F., Corp., 






29th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Greenwood, George A., 






35th Inf., . 


Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Greenwood, Paul, 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Greenwood, William H., 






59th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Grenache, Claude, 






5th Inf., . 


TJ. S. S. "Mississippi" in 

La. 
Cedar Mountain, Va., 


Oct. 


23, 1862. 


Grey, Thomas H , Corp., 






2d Inf., 


Aug. 


9, 1862. 


Grier, George, Sergt., . 






9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Griffin, Addison, . 






23d Inf., . 


Whitehall, N. C, 


Dec. 


16, 1862. 


Griffin, Benjamin, 






55th Inf., . 


James Island, S. C, . 


July 


2, 1864. 


Griffin, Charles E., 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Griffin, Henry E., 






49th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


20, 1863. 


Griffin, Nelson N., 






10th Inf., . 


Malvern Hill, Va., 


July 


1, 1862. 


Griffin, William H., . . 






55th Inf., . 


Honey Hill, S. C, . 


Nov. 


30, 1864. 


Griffith, Lucius E., 






20th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Griffiths, John, 






24th Inf., . 


Drewry's Bluff, Va., . 


May 


16, 1864. 


Griswold, Albert, Corp., 






49th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


May 


27, 1863. 


Griswold, Charles E., Col., . 






56th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Griswold, George W., . 






31st Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Griswold, Joseph W., . 






56th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


18, 1864. 


Gross, Edward, . 






1st Inf., 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Grosvener, Silas N., 1st Sergt., 






29th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


17, 1864. 


Grout, J. William, 2d Lieut., 


- 




15th Inf., . 


Ball's Bluff, Va., 


Oct. 


21, 1861. 


Grover, Byron H., 






2d Cav., . 


Dranesville, Va., 


Feb. 


22, 1864. 


Grover, Curtis W., 






1st Inf., 


Williamsburg, Va., . 


May 


5, 1862. 


Grumbacher, Moritz, Corp., 






25th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Grush, John C , Corp., 






58th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



369 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Bank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Grush, Joseph, 






40th Inf., . 


Drewry's Bluff, Va., . 


May 


16, 1864. 


Guilford, Charles H., . 






11th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Guilford, Joseph A., . 






19th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


11, 1862. 


Guilford, Samuel W., Sergt. 






40th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


1, 1864. 


Guinon, Philip R., Sergt., . 






19th Inf., . 


"White Oak Swamp, Va., . 


June 


30, 1862. 


Gulwin, Thomas R., . 






20th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Gunnison, Benjamin F., 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Gurney, Charles, . 






37th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Gurney, Richard, 






29th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


17, 1864. 


Gustine, Edward F., . 






5th Batt. L. A., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Gustus, Charles A., 






33d Inf., . 


Resaca, Ga., 


May 


15, 1864. 


Gutemuth, Frederick, . 






20th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Hackett, Horatio B, . 






35th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Hackett, Thomas, 






9th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Hackett, William, 






35th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Hadley, Eugene B., 






39th Inf., . 


Near Hatcher's Run, Va., 


Feb. 


6, 1865. 


Ha finer, Thomas, 






30th Inf., . 


Fisher's Hill, Va., . 


Sept. 


22, 1864. 


Hagerty, Michael, 






31st Inf., . 


Plaquemine, La., 


Feb. 


4, 1865. 


Haggerty, Patrick, 






19th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va M . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Haggins, Andre, . 






55th Inf., . 


Honey Hill, S. C, . 


Nov. 


30, 1864. 


Hale, George M., Corp., 






27th Inf., . 


Roanoke Island, N. C, 


Feb. 


8, 1862. 


Hale, John H., 






9th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


8, 1864. 


Hale, Samuel B., . 






36th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Haley, John, 






16th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


Haley, John P., 2d Lieut., 






30th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Hall, Adna P., 






13th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Hall, Edwin F., . 






58th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Hall, Eugene L., . 






26th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Hall, Everson, 






1st H. A., . 


Ny River, Va., . 


May 


19, 1864. 


Hall, Francis R., . 






4th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Hall, Isaac C, 






1st Cav., . 


Aldie, Va., .... 


June 


17, 1863. 


Hall, Jeremiah T., Corp., 






2d Inf., 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Hall, Levi, . 






4th Cav., . 


John's Island, S. C, . 


July 


17, 1864. 


Hall, Samuel M., Corp., 






34th Inf., . 


Piedmont, Va., . 


June 


5, 1864. 



370 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN" ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Kami: and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Hall, William B., 






1st Inf., 


Glendale, Va 


June 


30, 1862. 


Hall, William H., 






36th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Halsey, Colonel D., . « 






37th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Halzel, Charles Farrier, 






3d Cav., 


Sabine Cross Roads, La., . 


April 


8, 1864. 


Hamer, William T., 1st Sergt , 






29th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Hamilton, John L., Corp., . 






7th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Hammond, Anselm C, Sergt., 






1st Co. S. S., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Hammond, Franklin D., 2d Lieu 


t., 




58th Inf., . 


Before Petersburg, Va., 


June 


23, 1864. 


Hammond, George M., 






57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Hancock, James B., 2d Lieut., 






18th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Hand, William, Corp., 






28th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Handley, John, . 






57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Haney, John D., . 






3d Batt. L. A., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


14, 1864. 


Haney, Peter, 






3d Cav., 


Louisiana, .... 


Nov. 


4, 1862. 


Hannaford, Edward F., 






5th Inf., . 


Bull Run, Va., . 


July 


21, 1861. 


Hannan, Joseph, . 






21st Inf., . 


Roanoke Island, N. C, 


Feb. 


8, 1862. 


Hannigan, Michael, 






2d Inf., 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Hanscom, Creighton J., 






2d Inf., . 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Hanscom, Samuel C, Corp., 






2d Cav., . 


Mount Zion Church, Va., . 


July 


6, 1864. 


Hansler, Charles, Sergt., 






3d Cav., . 


Cedar Creek, Va., 


Oct. 


19, 1864. 


Hanson, Henry, . . .' 






56th Inf., . 


Before Petersburg, Va., . 


June 


30, 1864. 


Hanson, Robert M., 






12th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Hapgood, Oliver, 1st Sergt., 






19th Inf., . 


Glendale, Va., . 


June 


30, 1862. 


Harburn, William M., 






39th Inf., . 


Before Petersburg, Va., 


Aug. 


18, 1864. 


Harding, Christopher, . 






37th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


16, 1864. 


Harding, Thomas, Sergt., . 






1st Inf., 


Blackburn's Ford, Va., 


July 


18, 1861. 


Harding, William, 






39th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania,- Va., 


May 


10, 1864. 


Hardy, Franklin 






IstH. A., . 


Before Petersburg, Va., 


Oct. 


2, 1864. 


Hardy, George B., 






12th Inf., , 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Hardy, Granville, Sergt., . 






17th Inf., . 


Goldsboro', N. C, . 


Dec. 


17, 1862. 


Hare, Dennis, 






36th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Harley, William H., Capt., . 






58th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Harlow, C. Francis, 1st Sergt., 






29tb Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


March 25, 1865. 


Harmon, Jean M . 






59th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



371 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Bane. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Harmon, William H., Corp. 
Harnett, Garrett, Sergt., 
Harridon, Elisha B., . 
Harrington, John, Sergt., 
Harrington, Patrick, . 
Harrington, Timothy, . 
Harris, Charles, . 
Harris, Edward, . 
Harris, Edwin H., 
Harris, George W., 1st Sergt., 
Harris, John, Corp., . 
Harris, John S., 1st Lieut., 
Harris, Sullivan B., 
Harrison, William H., . 
Harroll, John, Corp., . 
Hart, John, . 

Hart, Thomas B., 2d Lieut., 
Hart, Wilbur, 
Hartley, Dennis, . 
Hartley, Henry, 1st Lieut., 
Hartung, John, . 
Harwood, Ezra 0., 
Harwood, Orrin S., 
Haskins, Ephraim H., Jr., 
Hastings, Charles S-, . 
Hastings, William 0., . 
Hatch, David G., . 
Hatch, Edward E., 
Hatch, Edwin B., Corp., 
Hatch, Enoch M., 
Hatch, Francis A., 
Hatch, Jason C, . 
Hatch, Richard A., Farrier, 
Hatcher, John* . 



7th Inf., . 


. 


12th Inf., . 


• 


22d Inf., . 


. 


31st Inf., . 


• 


33d Inf., . 


• 


9th Inf , 


• 


20th Inf., . 


• 


12th Inf., 


. 


11th Batt. I 


,.A., 


1st Inf., 


• 


16th Inf., 


• 


11th Inf., 


• 


39th Inf., 


> 


54th Inf., 


• 


56th Inf , 


• 


7th Inf., 


- 


61st Inf., 


. 


34th Inf., 


> 


56th Inf., 


• 


1st Inf., 


> 


1st Car., 


> • 


20th Inf., 


. 


10th Inf., 


. 


58th Inf., 


• 


20th Inf., 


• 


57th Inf., 


• 


16th Inf., 


- 


16th Inf., 


. 


39th Inf., 


• 


IstH. A., 


• 


2d Inf., 


. 


3d Cav., 


. 


2d Cav , 


• 


31st Inf., 


• 



Marye's Heights, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


18, 1864. 


Gaines' Mill, "Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Port Hudson, La., 


May 


25, 1863. 


Dallas, Ga., 


May 


25, 1864. 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


21, 1864. 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Before Petersburg, Va., 


June 


23, 1864. 


Fort Wagner, S. C, . 


July 


18, 1863. 


Weldon Railroad, Va., 


Aug. 


21, 1864. 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Petersburg, Va., 


April 


2, 1865. 


Piedmont, Va 


June 


5, 1864. 


North Anna River, Va., . 


May 


24, 1864. 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Aldie, Va., .... 


June 


17, 1863. 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Poplar Spring Church, Va., 


Sept. 


30, 1864. 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Before Petersburg, Va., 


Aug. 


3, 1864. 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Hatcher's Run, Va., . 


Feb. 


6, 1865. 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


16, 1864. 


Cedar Mountain, Va., 


Aug. 


9, 1862. 


Cedar Creek, Va., 


Oct. 


19,_ 1864. 


Difficult Run, Va., . 


May 


24, 1864. 


Yellow Bayou, La., . 


May 


18, 1864. 



* Should read Holcher, John. 



372 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action - 


- Continued. 


Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 
t 


Date. 


Hathaway, Joshua, Corp., . 




57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Hathaway, Rodney C M Corp., . 




39th Inf., . 


Weldon Railroad, Va., 


Aug. 


18, 1864. 


Haughney, Thomas, . 






56th Inf., . 


Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Haven, George F., 






36th Inf., . 


Knoxville, Tenn., 


Nov. 


29, 1863. 


Haven, Joseph, 






55th Inf., . 


Honey Hill, S. C, 


Nov. 


30, 1864. 


Haven, Samuel F., Jr., Surg 






15th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Hawkes, Josiah B., Corp., 






37th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Hawkes, Leopold H., . 






32d Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Hawkins, Richard, Corp., . 






20th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


11, 1862. 


Hawks, John F., . 






11th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Hayden, John E. B., . 






2d Cav., . 


Dranesville, Va., 


Feb. 


27, 1864. 


Hayes, Bernard, Corp., 






9th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Hayes, James J., . 






19th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Hayes, Patrick, . 






1st Cav., . 


John's Island, S. C, . 


June 


15, 1862. 


Hayes, Sylvester A., . 






13th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


1, 1863. 


Haymon, John, 






56th Inf., . 


Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Haynes, David T., 






IstH. A., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


16, 1864. 


Haynes, Thomas, 






22d Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 


May 


10, 1864. 


Hay ward, James S., . 






12th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Hazeltine, Warren, 






39th Inf., . 


Near Weldon Railroad, Va , 


Aug. 


19, 1864. 


Hazeltine, William, 






7th Inf., . 


Salem Heights, Va., . 


May 


3, 1863. 


Hazeltine, Nathaniel, . 






12th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Hazelton, Henry T., 






2d Inf., . 


Cedar Mountain, Va., 


Aug. 


9, 1862. 


Heald, Joel M., . 






30th Inf., . 


Baton Rouge, La., 


Aug. 


5, 1862. 


Heald, Samuel C, 






1st Inf., . 


Manassas, Va 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


Healey, Cornelius, 






12th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13; 1862. 


Healey, James I., Corp., 






9th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Healey, Thomas J., 






32d Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Heard, Albert S 






25th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Hearn, Patrick, . 






18th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Hearney, Charles, 






20th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Heath, John W., Corp., 






15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Heckox, Stephen W., . 






10th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Hefferman, Edward, . 






3d Cav., . 


Fisher's Hill, Va., . 


Sept. 


22, 1864. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



373 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Sank. 



Sergt., 
Corp., 



Heffron, Patrick W., 

Hemmenway, Alfred C 

Hemmenway, Haskell 

Henderson, Charles H 

Henderson, William H 

Hendrick, Edwin C, Sergt., 

Hendricks, Cornelius, 

Hennebry, Walter, 

Henrie, Proten, . 

Henry, Daniel, 

Henry, George P., 

Henry, John, 

Henry, William, . 

Hensey, Thomas, . 

Henzy, William, . 

Herman, Andrew, 

Hero, Gideon P., . 

Herrick, Austin A., 

Herrick, George W., 

Herrick, Reuben, Jr., 1st Sergt., 

Hervey, Joseph H., Sergt., . 

Hettler, Thomas, . 

Hevey, Thomas W., . 

Hewes, Edwin B., 

Hewins, Horatio L., . 

Hewins, William G., Capt., 

Hibbard, Lansing E., 1st Lieut., 

Hibbert, Franklin M., 

Hickey, Edward, . 

Hickey, James, • 

Hickey, William, . 

Higgins, Dennis, . 

Higgins, John, 

Hildreth, Martin T., Sergt., 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



3d Cav., 
10th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
40th Inf., 
37th Inf., 
27th Inf., 
24th Inf., 
21st Inf., 
21st Inf., 
39th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
31st Inf., 
34th Inf., 
49th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
34th Inf., 
18th Inf., 
1st H. A., 
17th Inf., 
40th Inf., 
19th Inf., 
5th Inf., 
38th Inf., 
40th Inf., 
49th Inf., 
18th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
27th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
11th Inf., 
31st Inf., 
58th Inf., 
18th Inf., 
4th Cav., 



Port Hudson, La., 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Malvern Hill, Va., 
Olustee, Fla , 
Sailor's Creek, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
New Berne, N. C, 
Weldon Railroad, Va 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Laurel Hill, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Port Hudson, La., 
Hatcher's Run, Va., 
Port Hudson, La., 
Knoxville, Tenn., 
Cedar Creek, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Ny River, Va., . 
Kinston, N. C, . 
Petersburg, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Bull Run, Va., . 
Bisland, La., 
Drewry's Bluff, Va., 
Port Hudson, La., 
Chancellorsville, Va. 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Drewry's Bluff, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Bisland, La., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Gum Creek, Fla., 



Nov. 30, 1863. 

May 31, 1862. 

July 1,1862. 

Feb. 20, 1864. 

April 6, 1865. 

June 3, 1864. 

March 14, 1862. 

Aug. 19, 1864. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

May 10, 1864. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

May 25, 1863. 
March 31, 1865. 

May 27, 1863. 

Nov. 20, 1863. 

Oct. 19, 1864. 

Aug. 30, 1862. 

May 19, 1864. 
March 8, 1865. 

June 17, 1864. 

July 3, 1863. 

July 21, 1861. 

April 13, 1863. 

May 16, 1864. 

May 27, 1863. 

May 3, 1863. 

May 10, 1864. 

May 16, 1864. 

July 2, 1863. 

July 2, 1863. 

April 13, 1863. 

June 3, 1864. 

Aug. 30, 1862. 

Oct. 24, 1864. 



374 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action - 


- Continued. 


Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Hill, Edwin R., 1st Lieut, . 




55th Inf., . 


Deveaux Neck, S. C, 


Dec. 


9, 1864. 


Hill, Henry, 1st Sergt., 






33d Inf., . 


Dallas, Ga., 


May 


25, 1864. 


Hill, James, 2d Lieut-, 






33d Inf., . 


Lookout Mountain, Tenn., 


Oct. 


29, 1863. 


Hill, Lucius A., . 






22d Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 


May 


10, 1864. 


Hill, Mason A., Sergt., 






7th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


8, 1864. 


Hill, William, 1st Lieut., . 






35th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Hill, William B., 2d Lieut., 






21st Inf., . 


Chantilly, Va., . . . 


Sept. 


1, 1862. 


Hill, William F., . 






20th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., . . . 


July 


3, 1863. 


Hill, William W., 






58th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


26, 1864. 


Hillman, Fordyce L., . 






31st Inf., . 


Alexandria, La., 


May 


14, 1864. 


Hillman, John H., 






15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Hills, Joseph S., Capt., 






16th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Hilton, James, 






15th Inf., . 


Ball's Bluff, Va., 


Oct. 


21, 1861. 


Hinds, Ambrose, . 






35th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Hines, Henry G., . 






34th Inf., . 


Piedmont, Va., . 


June 


5, 1864. 


Hines, John, 






2d Inf., 


Cedar Mountain, Va., 


Aug. 


9, 1862. 


Hines, John, 






34th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va , 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Hinkley, Charles E., Sergt., 






56th Inf., . 


Near Petersburg, Va., 


April 


2, 1865. 


Hinkley, David R., . . . 






35th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Hixson, Edward T., . . , 






11th Inf., . 


Mine Run, Va., . 


Nov. 


27, 1863. 


Hobbs, Curtis, Sergt., . 






38th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Hoben, John, .... 






56th Inf., . 


Pegram Farm, Va., . 


Sept. 


30, 1864. 


Hoben, Patrick, .... 






28th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Hockley, Edward J., . 






12th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Hodgdon, Oliver L., Sergt., 






28th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Hodge, Jerome K., 






12th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Hodges, John, Jr., Lieut. Col., . 






59th Inf., . 


Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Hodges, Joel, .... 






53d Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Hodges, John W., 






35th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Hodges, William T., Capt., 






4th Cav., . 


High Bridge, Va., 


April 


6, 1865. 


Hodgman, William, 






21st Inf., . 


Roanoke Island, N. C, 


Feb. 


8, 1862. 


Hoffman, Max, Corp., . 






36th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


17, 1864. 


Hogan, Benjamin, 






54th Inf., . 


Fort Wagner, S. C, . 


July 


18, 1863. 


Hogan, Edward E., 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



375 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Namb and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Hogan, John, Corp., 
Hogan, John, 
Hogan, John F., 
Hogan, Patrick, 
Hogan, Thomas, 
Hoil, Henry A., 
Holbrook, Charles E., 
Holbrook, Chas. E., Sergt., 
Holbrook, John W , 
Holbrook, Henry C, 2d Lieut., 
Holbrook, Maynard, 
Holbrook, Randall J., 
Holbrook, Willard R., 
Holden, Henry, . 
Holden, Henry A., 
Holden, Hollis, . 
Holden, John B., . 
Holien, Patrick, . 
Holland, Daniel, . 
Holland, William, 2d Lieut. 
Hollighan, 'William, 
Hollis, Ai, . 

Holloway, Charles M , Corp. 
Holman, Orlando, 
Holman, William E., . 
Holmes, Alfred C, 1st Sergt 
Holmes, Edward, Corp., 
Holmes, Frederick, 2d Lieut. 
Holmes, Lyman T., Sergt., 
Holmes, Marion P., 1st Lieut., 
Holmes, Orin D., . 
Holt, Alfred A., . 
Holt, Jonathan A., 
Holt, Washington J., Corp., 



28th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
33d Inf., 
28th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
25th Inf., 
34th Inf., 
21st Inf., 
40th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
33d Inf., 
25th Inf., 
13th Inf., 
13th Inf., 
40th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
19th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
30th Inf., 
54th Inf., 
25th Inf., 
25th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
18th Inf., 
38th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
36th Inf., 
29th Inf., 
IstH. A., 
1st H. A., 
25th Inf., 



Secessionville, S. C, 
Antietam, Md., . 
Resaca, Ga., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Antietam, Md., . 
Petersburg, Va., 
Near Rice's Station, Vi 
Antietam, Md., . 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Averysboro,' N. C, 
Goldsboro', N. C, 
Manassas, Va., . 
Antietam, Md., . 
Drewry's Bluff, Va., 
Malvern Hill, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Secessionville, S. C, 
Donaldsonville, La., 
James Island, S. C, 
Near Petersburg, Va., 
Proctor's Creek, Va., 
Glendale, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Port Hudson, La., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Campbell Station, Tenn. 
Petersburg, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 



June 16, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

May 15, 1864. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

June 27, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

June 18, 1864. 

April 6, 1865. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

June 3, 1864. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

March 17, 1865. 

Dec. 17, 1862. 

Aug. 30, 1862. 

Sept. 17, 1862. 

May 16, 1864. 

July 1, 1862. 

July 3, 1863. 

Dec. 13, 1862. 

June 16, 1862. 

July 13, 1863. 

July 16, 1863. 

May 18, 1864. 

May 12, 1864. 

June 30, 1862. 

Aug. 30, 1862. 

June 14, 1863. 

May 18, 1864. 

Nov. 16, 1863. 
March 25, 1865. 

May 19, 1864. 

May 19, 1864. 

June 3, 1864. 



376 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Home, James, 
Hood, Thomas J., 
Hooker, Oliver C , 
Hooper, Nathaniel F., . 
Hopkins, Edward P., 1st Lieut. 
Horigan, Patrick, 
Horn, Charles B., 
Horn, Charles C, Corp., 
Horn, Thomas, 
Horr, Calvin, 
Horrigan, Arthur, 
Horrigan, Dennis, 
Houghterling, William, 
Houghton, Albert C, . 
Houghton, Albert C, Corp. 
Houghton, "William A., 
Houseman, Charles H., 
Houston, William F., . 
Hovey, Charles E., 
Howard, Caleb, 1st Sergt., 
Howard, Charles, 
Howard, Charles H., Corp., 
Howard, Daniel P., 
Howard, Henry O., 
Howard, Hiram V., 
Howard, James, . 
Howard, Joseph A., 
Howard, Linus P., 
Howard, Patrick, . 
Howard, Robert, . 
Howe, Alfred G., Sergt., 
Howe, Alfred G., . 
Howe, Ansel L., . 
Howe, Elijah, 



20th Inf., . 


. 


26th Inf., . 


• 


37th Inf., . 


. 


20th Inf., . 


. 


1st Cav., 


• 


12th Inf, . 


• 


56th Inf., 


• 


26th Inf., 


• 


15th Inf., 


• 


33d Inf., . 


• 


1st Cav., 


. 


16th Inf., , 


• 


61st Inf., 


. 


16th Inf., . 


• 


2d Inf., 


• 


1st H. A., 


• 


32d Inf., 


. 


1st Inf., 


• 


10th Inf., 


• 


58th Inf., 


• 


16th Inf., , 


• 


16th Inf., 


• 


19th Inf., 


> 


2d Inf., 


• 


20th Inf., . 


• 


26th Inf., 


• 


22d Inf., 


• 


12th Inf., 


■ 


56th Inf., 


■ 


1st Cav., 


• 


13th Inf., 


. 


18th Inf., 


• • 


39th Inf., 


• 


33d Inf., 


• 






Wilderness, Va., 
Cedar Creek, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., . 

Ashland, Va 

Wilderness, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Winchester, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Rapidan, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Chancellorsville, Va., 
North Anna River, Va., . 
Poplar Spring Church, Va., 

Manassas, Va 

Salem Heights, Va., . 
Crater Petersburg, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Wilderness, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., . 
Cedar Mountain, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Winchester, Va., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Bethesda Church, Va., 
Todd's Tavern, Va., . 
Manassas, Va., . 
Wilderness, Va., 
Weldon Railroad, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 



May 


12, 


1864. 


Oct. 


19, 


1864. 


May 


6, 


1864. 


Dec. 


11, 


1862. 


May 


11, 


1864. 


May 


6, 


1864. 


May 


12 


1864. 


Sept. 


19, 


1864. 


July 


2, 


1863. 


July 


2 


1863. 


Sept. 


14, 


1863. 


May 


12 


1864. 


April 


2 


1865. 


Aug. 


29 


1862. 


May 


3 


1863. 


May 


24 


1864. 


Sept. 


30 


1864. 


Aug. 


29 


1862. 


May 


3 


1863. 


July 


30 


1864. 


Aug. 


29, 


1862. 


May 


5 


1864. 


Dec. 


13 


1862. 


Aug. 


9 


1862. 


July 


3 


1863. 


Sept. 


19 


1864. 


June 


27 


1862. 


Aug. 


30 


1862. 


May 


31 


1864. 


May 


6 


, 1864. 


Aug. 


30 


1862. 


May 


5 


, 1864. 


Aug. 


18 


, 1864. 


July 


2 


, 1863. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



377 



List of Massachusetts Officers and. Soldiers killed in Action - 


- Continued. 


Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Howe, George, 






25th Inf., . 


Walthall Junction, Va., . 


May 


6, 1864. 


Howe, George H., Capt., 






57th Inf., . 


Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Howe, Henry J., Maj., 






19th Inf., . 


Glendale, Va., 


June 


30, 1862. 


Howe, Henry W., 






16th Inf., . 


Glendale, Va., . 


June 


30, 1862. 


Howe, John E., Corp., 


- . 




18th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Howe, Nelson H., Corp., 






14th Batt. L. A., 


Before Petersburg, Va., . 


Aug. 


22, 1864. 


Howe, Orrin, 






16th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Howes, Seth T., . 






58th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Howland, Levi S., 






58th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Howland, Lothrop R., . 






33d Inf., . 


Wauhatchie, Tenn., . 


Oct. 


29, 1863. 


Hoxsey, Henry C, 






2d Inf., 


Cedar Mountain, Va., 


Aug. 


9, 1862. 


Hoye, Patrick, Corp., . 






2d Inf., 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Hoyt, Amos, 






36th Inf., . 


Jackson, Miss 


July 


11, 1863. 


Hoyt, Patrick, 






15th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Hoyt, William C, 






12th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Hubbard, Charles H., Corp. 






40th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Hubbard. John, . 






2d Inf., 


Cedar Mountain, Va., 


Aug. 


9, 1862. 


Hubbard, Martin S., . 






37th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Hudson, Jonathan, 






19th Inf., . 


White Oak Swamp, Va., . 


June 


30, 1862. 


Hudson, "William D., . 






32d Inf., .. 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Hughes, James, Corp., . 






9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Hughes, John, 2d, Sergt., . 






16th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


Hughes, Luke, 






56th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Hughes, Peter, 






9th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Hull, John, . 






19th Inf., . 


Oak Grove, Va., 


June 


25, 1862. 


Hull, William C, 






1st Inf., 


Locust Grove, Va., . 


Nov. 


27, 1863. 


Hume, Archibald, 






59th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Humphrey, Edwin, Capt., 






11th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Hunck, Frederick, 






20th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Hunnewell, John A., . 






12th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Hunnewell, Randall F., 






3d Cav., . 


Alexandria, La., 


May 


1, 1864. 


Hunt, Charles E., 






18th Inf., . 


Bethesda Church, Va., 


June 


2, 1864. 


Hunt, John Q., Sergt., 






35th Inf., . 


Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Hunt, Russell F., 






10th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 



378 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Bane. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Hunt, Thomas, 






28th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Hunt, William, . 






1st H. A., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


16, 1864. 


Hunter, George F., 






1st H. A., . 


Petersburg, Va., . ' . 


June 


16, 1864. 


Hunter, Jared M., 






20th Inf., . 


Front of Richmond, Va., . 


June 


30, 1862. 


Hunter, Robert, . 






1st Cav , . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Hunting, Albert G., 






16th Inf., . 


Oak Grove, Va , . 


June 


25, 1862. 


Hunting, Stephen F., . 






1st H. A., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


March 25, 1865. 


Huntington, George D., 






22d Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Huntington, James H., 






26th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Hurd, Hiram A., . 






12th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Hurley, Owen, 






38th Inf., . 


Opequon, Va., . 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Hurley, Patrick, Corp., 






19th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Hurley, William, . 






2d Cav., . 


Waynesboro', Va., 


Sept. 


28, 1864. 


Hurrell, John, 






9th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


Hurst, Thomas, . 






21st Inf., . 


New Berne, N. C, 


March 14, 1862. 


Hussey, Patrick, . 






37th Inf., . 


Getty sburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Hutchings, Lewis, 






1st Inf., 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Hutchings, Thomas J., 






33d Inf., . 


Lookout Mountain, Tenn., . 


Oct. 


29, 1863. 


Hutchins, Edward, Sergt., 






1st Co. S. S., 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Hutchinson, Everett, Corp., 






33d Inf., . 


Resaca, Ga , 


May 


15, 1864. 


Hutchinson, John, Corp., 






11th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Hutchinson, William H., 






25th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Hyde, Dennis, . . . 






9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 

i 


June 


27, 1862. 


Hyde, John, . 








9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Hyde, John S., 








37th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Ide, George H., . 








2d Inf., 


Cedar Mountain, Va., 


Aug. 


9, 1862. 


Inch, William, 








20th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Ingalls, John, 








19th Inf., . 


Deep Bottom, Va., 


Aug. 


25, 1864. 


Ingalls, Joseph S., 








1st Co. S. S., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Ingersol, Eugene, 








49th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


May 


27, 1863. 


Ingraham, Hector, 








1st Inf., 


Oak Grove, Va., 


June 


25, 1862. 


Inhoff, Charles, . 








35th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Ireland, Edward, . 








39th Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., j 


May 


12, 1864. 


Irish, Charles S., Corp. 


i 






1st H. A., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


March 25, 1865. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN" ACTION. 



379 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Irving, Harry P ,. 






2d Cav.. . 


Ashby's Gap, Va., 


July 


12, 1863. 


Isaac, Alexander, 






12th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Jackman, Frank D. f . . . 






1st H. A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


Jackson, Alonzo, . 






1st Cav., . 


Aldie, Va., .... 


June 


17, 1863. 


Jackson, Daniel R., Corp., . 






13th Inf., . 


Thoroughfare Gap, Va., . 


Aug. 


28, 1862. 


Jackson, Edward A., . 






27th Inf., . 


New Berne, N. C, 


March 


14, 1862. 


Jackson, Joseph M., Corp., . 






53d Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Jackson, Thomas L., . 






32d Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Jackson, Wesley, . 






1st Inf., . 


Glendale, Va., . 


June 


30, 1862. 


Jacobs, Andrew G., 






19th Inf., . 


Glendale, Va., . 


June 


30, 1862. 


Jacobs, James E., 






56th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Jacobs, William F., 






12th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


James, Charles H., 






11th Inf., . 


Bull Run, Va., . 


July 


21, 1861. 


Jameson, George, . 






57th Inf., . 


Before Petersburg, Va., 


Oct. 


8, 1864. 


Janes, Paschal, .... 






37th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


18, 1864. 


Jaquith, Charles H 






56th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Jaquith, Charles W., Corp., . 






40th Inf., . 


Hatchies, Va., . 


May 


20, 1864. 


Jarvis, Charles F., 






IstH. A., . 
21st Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


Jarvis, George W., 






Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


2, 1864. 


Jellison, Samuel C, . 






19th Inf., . 


Glendale, Va., . 


June 


30, 1862. 


Jenkinson, George B., Corp., 






3d Cav., 


Jackson, La 


Aug. 


3, 1863. 


Jennison, Joseph, Jr., . 






15th Inf., . 


Ball's Bluff, Va., 


Oct. 


21, 1861. 


Jewell, Franklin, . 






2d Inf., 


Cedar Mountain, Va., 


Aug. 


9, 1862. 


Jewett, Harrison, . 






59th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


17, 1864. 


Joeckel, George, 1st Sergt, . 






20th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., . . 


July 


3, 1863. 


Johnson, Arad, .... 






34th Inf., . 


* 

New Market, Va., 


May 


15, 1864. 


Johnson, Charles, 






32d Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Johnson, Charles E., Sergt., 






12th Inf , . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Johnson, Charles H., Corp., 






34th Inf., . 


New Market, Va., 


May 


15, 1864. 


Johnson, Eben N., 






23d Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Johnson, Edward, Sergt., . 






3d Cav., . 


Alexandria, La., 


May 


1, 1864. 


Johnson, Edward E., . 






28th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Johnson, Elisha F., Sergt., . 






15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Johnson, Franklin, 






55th Inf., . 


St. Stephens, S. C, . 


March 


1, 1865. 



380 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Johnson, Henry, . 
Johnson, James J., 
Johnson, James P., 
Johnson, John, 
Johnson, John E., 
Johnson, Lewis, . 
Johnson, Loring, . 
Johnson, Martin L., 
Johnson, Sylvester D., 
Johnson, Walter, . 
Johnson, William H., 
Johnson, William H , 
Johnson, William H., 
Johnston, John A., 
Johnston, Simon T., 
Johnston, Thomas, 
Johnston, William A., 
Jollimore, William, 
Jones, Charles, 
Jones, Charles E., Corp 
Jones, Charles H., 
Jones, Edward F., 
Jones, Evan P., . 
Jones, Frederick A., Sergt., 
Jones, Henry, 
Jones, John W., . 
Jones, Oswego, 2d Lieut., 
Jones, William, . 
Jones, William, . 
Jordan, Charles C, 
Jordan, Charles E., 
Jordan, James, 
Jordan, Joseph M., 
Jorgenson, Hans P., Capt., 



5th Cav., 
20th Inf., 
54th Inf., 
2d Cav., 
11th Inf., 
11th Inf., 
19th Inf., 
53d Inf., 
10th Inf., 
32d Inf., 
1st H. A., 
55th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
59th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
59th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
1st Inf., 
57th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
11th Inf., 
31st Inf., 
26th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
10th Inf., 
33d Inf., 
24th Inf., 
55th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
22d Inf., 
12th Inf., 
18th Inf., 
15th Inf., 



Petersburg, Va., 
Fredericksburg, Va., . 
Boykin's Mills, S. C, 
Mount Zion Church, Va., , 
Manassas, Va., . 
Before Petersburg, Va., 
North Anna River, Va., 
Port Hudson, La., 
Fair Oaks, Va., . 
Shady Grove .Church, Va. 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
James Island, S. C, . 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Near Petersburg, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Chancellorsville, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Virginia, 

Williamsburg Road, Va., 
Malvern Hill, Va., 
Binian's Mills, La., . 
Winchester, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 
New Berne, N. C, 
Honey Hill, S. C, . 
Wilderness, Va., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 



June 


15, 


1864. 


Dec. 


11, 


1862. 


April 


18, 


1865. 


July 


6, 


1864. 


Aug. 


29, 


1862. 


Sept. 


10, 


1864. 


May 


24, 


1864. 


June 


14, 


1863. 


May 


31, 


1862. 


May 


30, 


1864. 


May 


19, 


1864. 


July 


2, 


1864. 


June 


27, 


1862. 


June 


17, 


1864. 


June 


27, 


1862. 


Oct. 


15, 


1864. 


May 


18, 


1864. 


May 


3, 


1863. 


May 


6, 


1864. 


May 




1864. 


June 


18, 


1862. 


Aug. 


5, 


1862. 


May 


1, 


1864. 


Sept. 


19, 


1864. 


July 


3, 


1863. 


May 


5, 


1864. 


Oct. 


29, 


1863. 


March 14, 


1862. 


Nov. 


30, 


1864. 


May 


5, 


1864. 


June 


27, 


1862. 


May 


12, 


1864. 


June 


27, 


1862. 


July 


2 


1863. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



381 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Kank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Joslin, Herbert, . 
Joy, John, . 
Joyce, Edwin L., Sergt., 
Judson, Isaac D., 
Kaine, Benedict F., 
Kalaher, Cornelius, 
Kane, Dennis H., Musician, 
Kanna, John, 
Kanuse, Benjamin F., . 
Kay, Thomas, Corp., . 
Kearney, Charles, Corp., 
Kearney, James W., . 
Kearns, Peter, 
Keating, Patrick, . 
Keefe, Peter, 
Keen, Charles J., . 
Keenan, Edward, 
Keenan, Michael, . 
Keene, Frank A., 
Kehr, George W., 
Keith, Charles B., 
Keith, Eugene, 
Keith, Friend H., Sergt., 
Keith, Thaddeus, 1st Sergt 
Kellam, Ansel B., Sergt., 
Kelleher, Patrick, 
Kelley, Daniel A., 
Kelley, Edward B., . 
Kelley, Edward J., 
Kelley, George F., 
Kelley, James W., 
Kelley, John, 
Kelley, John C, Sergt., 
Kelley, Patrick, Corp., 



21st Inf., 
2d Inf., 
IstH. A., 
12th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
30th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
5th Batt. L 
17th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
1st Cav., 
33d Inf., 
9th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
32d Inf., 
9th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
8th Batt. L 
20th Inf., 
26th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
29th Inf., 
9th Inf., 
54th Inf., 
28th Inf., 
40th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
23d Inf., 
28th Inf., 
16th Inf., 
28th Inf., 



A.,. 



A., 



Wilderness, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Wilderness, Va., 
Crater Petersburg, Va. 
Cedar Creek, Va., 
Williamsburg Road, Va., 
Petersburg, Va., 
Kinston, N. C, . 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Vaughn Road, Va., 
Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Laurel Hill, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
South Mountain, Md. 
Antietam, Md., . 
Winchester, Va., 
Ball's Bluff, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Wilderness, Va., 
White Oak Swamp, Va., 
Wilderness, Va., 
Fort Wagner, S. C, 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Ball's Bluff, Va., 
Drewry's Bluff, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Kelly's Ford, Va., 



May 

July 

June 

Sept. 

May 

July 

Oct. 

June 

June 

March 

June 

Oct. 

June 

June 

July 

May 

May 

June 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

May 

June 

May 

July 

June 

June 

Oct. 

May 

May 

May 

Dec. 



6, 1864. 
3, 1863. 

16, 1864. 

17, 1862. 

5, 1864. 
30, 1864. 
19, 1864. 

18, 1862. 

18, 1864. 
8, 1865. 

27, 1862. 

1, 1864. 
22, 1864. 
27, 1862. 

3, 1863. 
10, 1864. 
12, 1864. 
27, 1862. 
14, 1862. 
17, 1862. 

19, 1864. 
21, 1861. 

17, 1862. 

6, 1864. 
29, 1862. 

5, 1864. 

18, 1863, 
3, 1864. 
3, 1864. 

21, 1861. 
16, 1864. 
18, 1864. 
10, 1864. 
3, 1863. 



382 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action— Continued. 



Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Kelley, Patrick, . 




28th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Kelley, Robert, . 




20th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Kelley, Thomas, . 




25th Inf., . 


Roanoke Island, N. C, 


Feb. 


8, 1862. 


Kelley, Thomas, . 




20th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Kelley, "William, . 




28th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Kelly, James, 




IstH. A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


Kelly, John, .... 




1st Cav., 


Aldie, Va., .... 


June 


17, 1863. 


Kelly, Lawrence H., . 




1st Inf., 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Kelly, Michael, . 




37th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


April 


2, 1865. 


Kelly, Michael E M 




1st Cav., . 


Jerusalem Plank Road, Va., 


Sept. 


16, 1864. 


Kelly, Patrick, 




9th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


8, 1864. 


Kelly, Thomas, . 




57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Kelren, William, Sergt., 




1st Inf., 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Kelty, Eugene, Capt., . 




30th Inf., . 


Baton Rouge, La., 


Aug. 


5, 1862. 


Kelverton, William, 




1st Inf., 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Kemp, George A., Sergt., . 




11th Inf., . 


Bull Run, Va., . 


July 


21, 1861. 


Kempton, Martin V., . 




20th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


11, 1862. 


Kendall, Albert A., Asst. Surg., 




12th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Kendall, Edmund H., . 




13th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Kenneally, John, . 




28th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


May 


31, 1864. 


Kennedy, James, . 




28th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Kennedy, John, Sergt., 




16th Inf., . 


Williamsburg Road, Va., . 


June 


18, 1862. 


Kennedy, Kelah, . 




12th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Kennedy, Paul, Corp., 




16th Inf., . 


Williamsburg Road, Va , . 


June 


18, 1862. 


Kennedy, Timothy, 




28th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Kenney, Patrick, Corp., 




28th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Kenney, Silas C, Corp., 




38th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Kenny, Andrew J., 




IstH. A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


Kenny, Edward, .... 




30th Inf., . 


Cedar Creek, Va., 


Oct. 


19, 1864. 


Kenny, Thomas F., Corp., . . 




18th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Kent, George S., Corp., 




1st H. A., . 


Petersburg, Va., . 


June 


'16, 1864. 


Kent, Timothy, .... 




28th Inf., . 


Chantilly, Va., . 


Sept. 


i, 186?. 


Kerrigan, Patrick, 




56th Inf., . 


Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Keyes, George E., Sergt., . 




36th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


17, 1864. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



383 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Keyes, Jonathan H., . 






18th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, "Va., . 


De'c. 


13, 1862. 


Keyes, Marshall, Sergt , 






18th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Keyes, Michael, . 






37th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


19, 1864. 


Kidder, Edward J., 2d Lieut., 






12th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


10, 1864. 


Kilburn, Henry P., Sergt., . 






53d Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


2, 1863. 


Kilburn, Joseph A., 






16th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


Killdary, Michael, 






24th Inf., . 


Bachelor's Creek, N. C, . 


Nov. 


12, 1862. 


Killg^riff, Patrick, 






58th Inf., . 


Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Kimball, Dennison S., . 






35d Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Kimball, Frank L., 






34th Inf., . 


Piedmont, Va., . 


June 


5, 1864. 


Kimball, Isaac F., 






11th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


May 


12, 1864.- 


Kimball, John S., Corp., 






22d Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 


May 


14, 1864. 


Kimball, Joseph "W., Capt., 






1st H. A., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


22, 1864. 


Kimball, Richard H., Capt., 






12th Inf., . 


Bull Run, 2d, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Kimball, Samnel, 






18th Inf., . 


Bull Run, 2d, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


King, Anthony L., 






55th Inf., . 


Honey Hill, S. C, 


Nov. 


30, 1864. 


King, Edward S., 






37th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


21, 1864. 


King, George 






37th Inf., . 


"Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


King,, Harry B., 1st Sergt., . 






34th Inf., . 


Lynchburg, Va., 


June 


18, 1864. 


King, Henry, 






54th Inf., . 


James Island, S. C, . 


July 


16, 1863. 


King, John G., .... 






28th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


King, Leander G., Capt., 






16th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


King, Robert, Sergt., . 






55th Inf., . 


Honey Hill, S. C, . 


Nov. 


30, 1864. 


Kingsbury, Allen A., . 






1st Inf., . 


Yorktown, Va 


April 


26, 1862. 


Kingsbury, George 0., 






18th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


Kingsley, Edward H., Corp., 






2d Cav., . 


Waynesboro', Va., 


Sept. 


27, 1864. 


Kingsley, "William M., Corp., 






37th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Kirkner, John, 






15th Inf., . 


Ball's Bluff, Va., 


Oct. 


21, 1861. 


Kittridge, Malcom G., . 






2d Inf., . 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Klinkler, William, 






29th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


March 25, 1865. 


Knackfor, Charles, 






31st Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Knapp, Freeman, Corp., 






33d Inf., . 


Lookout Mountain, Tenn., 


Oct. 


29, 1863. 


Knapp, "William M., Sergt., 






37th Inf., . 


"Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


Kneenan, John, . 






36th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 



384 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Knight, Henry E., 






21st Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Knight, Phineas F., Corp., . 






21st Inf., . 


Chantilly, "Va 


Sept. 


1, 1862. 


Knights, George, .... 






53d Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Knowlton, Charles R. T., . 






11th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Knox, William S., 






31st Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


May 


30, 1863. 


Konch, Henry, .... 






15th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


31, 1864. 


Kraft, Alois, .... 






20th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Kranze, Robert, .... 






32d Inf., . 


Boydtown Plank Road, Va., 


March 


3, 1865. 


Krunkleton, Cyrus, 






54th Inf., . 


James Island, S. C., . 


July 


16, 1863. 


Kummer, Henry W., . 






12th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Kyle, John, 






1st Inf., . 


Glendale, Va., . 


June 


30, 1862. 


Kyle, Robert, Corp., . 






40th Inf., . 


Hatchies, Va., . 


May 


20, 1864. 


Labornbard, Peter, 






57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


LaBounty, Franklin, Corp., 






IstH. A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


LaClaire, John E., 






13th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Lacore, Edward, . 






21st Inf., . 


New Berne, N. C, 


March 14, 1862. 


Ladd, George H., . 






22d Inf., . 


Malvern Hill, Va., 


July 


1, 1862. 


Ladd, Henry E., . 






1st Cav., 


Aldie, Va., .... 


June 


17, 1863. 


Ladd, Luther C, . 






6th Inf., . 


Baltimore, Md., . 


April 


19, 1861. 


Lajoy, Joseph, 






12th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Lake, Henry J.,* . 






21st Inf., . 


Chantilly, Va., . 


Sept. 


1, 1862. 


Lakin, Jefferson, . 






2d Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 


May 


25, 1862. 


Lamb, Willard, . 






10th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


Lambert, John C, 






29th Inf., . 


Bethesda Church, Va., 


June 


1, 1864. 


Lambert, Joseph, 






9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Lambert, Joseph, . 






35th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Lamont, John C, 






4th Cav., . 


McGurth's Creek, Fla., 


March 


1, 1864. 


Lamson, Daniel, 1st Sergt., 






35th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


13, 1862. 


Lanagan, John, .... 






9th Inf , . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Lander, George M., 






21st Inf., . 


Shady Grove Road, Va., . 


May 


31, 1864. 


Lane, Ebenezer, . 






16th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Lane, Edwin A., . 






40th Inf., . 


Before Petersburg, Va., 


June 


24, 1864. 


Lane, James, 






20th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


3, 1863. 


Lane, John A., 






35th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 



* Also reported as Lake, John H., wounded at Chantilly. Died Oct. 4, 1862. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



385 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Lane, Philip, .... 




1st H. A., . 


Petersburg, Va., 




June 


18, 1864. 


Lapham, "William H. H., . 




5th Batt. L. A., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 




June 


3, 1864. 


Larkin, John P., . 




15th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 




Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Larkins, Ira, Sergt., 




37th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 




May 


18, 1864. 


Larrabee, William W., 




2d Inf., 


Cedar Mountain, Va., 




Aug. 


9, 1862. 


Lashua, Frank, .... 




57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 




May 


6, 1864. 


Laskey, Richard S., 




32d Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 




May 


12, 1864. 


Latham, William W., . 




27th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 




July 


24, 1864. 


Lattimer, William H 




1st Inf., 


Gettysburg, Pa., 




July 


2, 1863. 


Lavensala, Henry, 




22d Inf., . 


Laurel Hill, Va., 




May 


8, 1864. 


Lawler, Andrew J., Major, . 




28th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 




May 


18, 1864. 


Lawler, Charles, .... 




40th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 




June 


1, 1864. 


Lawler, Daniel, .... 




4th Cav., . 


Gum Creek, Fla., 




Oct. 


24, 1864. 


Lawler, Patrick, , 




2d Co. S. S., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 




May 


30, 1864. 


Lawless, Richard, Corp., 




24th Inf., . 


Whitehall, N. C, 




Dec. 


16, 1862. 


Lawrence, George M 




33d Inf., . 


Dallas, Ga., 




May 


25, 1864. 


Lawrence, Joel F., 




16th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 




May 


10, 1864. 


Lawrence, John, . 




33d Inf., . 


Resaca, Ga., 




May 


14, 1864. 


Lawrence, Joshua T., . 




13th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . ' 




Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Lawrence, Willard R., 




15th Inf.,. . 


Ball's Bluff, Va., 




Oct. 


21, 1861. 


Lawrence, William H., Sergt., . 




5th Inf., 


Bull Run, Va., . 




July 


21, 1861. 


Lawton, George 




16th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 




July 


2, 1863. 


Lawton, Joseph W., 2d Lieut., 




27th Inf., . 


New Berne, N. C, 




March 14, 1862. 


Lay, James B., . 




10th Inf., . 


Malvern Hill, Va., 




July 


1, 1862. 


Leach, Edward, Sergt., 




19th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 




Sept. 


17, 1862. 


Leach, Josiah, . 




2d H. A., . 


Plymouth, N. C, 




April 


20, 1864. 


Leahey, Philip, 




34th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 




Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Leary, Daniel, Corp., . 




9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 




June 


27, 1862. 


Leary, James, 




26th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 




Sept. 


19, 1864. 


Leary, John, 




28th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 




July 


2, 1863. 


Leary, Timothy, . 




28th Inf., . 


Chantilly, Va., . 




Sept 


1, 1862. 


Leaverns, James H., Sergt., 




18th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 




July 


2, 1863. 


Leavitt, Marcus M., . 




7th Inf., . 


Chancellorsville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Lee, David, 1st Lieut., 




19th Inf., . 


Fair Oaks, Va., . 


June 


30, 1862. 



386 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Leeland, Charles E., . 






13th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


1, 1863. 


Lefevre, Alfred, .... 






59th Inf., . 


Poplar Spring Church, Va., 


Sept. 


30, 1864. 


Lefflan, Samuel F., . . . 






1st H. A., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


16, 1864. 


Legat, Gunhatz, .... 






32d Inf., . 


Bethesda Church, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Leggett, William F., . 






37th Inf., . 


Sailor's Creek, Va., . 


April 


6, 1865. 


Leigh ton, Frank, . 






6th Inf., . 


Deserted House, Va., 


Jan. 


30, 1863. 


Leland, Benjamin F., 2d Lieut., 






10th Inf., . 


Seven Pines, Va., 


May 


31, 1862. 


Lemon, Francis P., . 






58th Inf., . 


Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Lennon, Thomas H., . . . 






2d Inf., 


Atlanta, Ga., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Leonard, Patrick, 






21st Inf., . 


Roanoke Island, N. C, 


Feb. 


8, 1862. 


Leonard, William A., . . ■ 






20th Inf., . 


Ball's Bluff, Va., 


Oct. 


21, 1861. 


Leroux, Louis, .... 






28th Inf., . 


Before Petersburg, Va., 


Oct. 


10, 1864. 


Lester, George H., . . . 






34th Inf., . 


New Market, Va., 


May 


15, 1864. 


Lesure, Chester E., Corp., . . 






16th Inf., . 


Chancellors ville, Va., 


May 


3, 1863. 


Lever, Richard, . 






59th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Levi, Samuel, .... 






56th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


Levois, Frederick,* 






21st Inf., . 


Chantilly, Va., . 


Sept. 


1, 1862. 


Lewis, Augustus, . 






54th Inf., . 


Fort Wagner, S. C, . 


July 


18, 1863. 


Lewis, Austin R., Sergt., 






55th Inf., . 


Honey Hill, S. C, . 


Nov. 


30, 1864. 


Lewis, Edward 






55th Inf., . 


Honey Hill, S. C, . 


Nov. 


30, 1864. 


Lewis, Edwin N., 






3d Batt. L. A., . 


Yorktown, Va 


April 


5, 1862. 


Lewis, Francis A., Corp., . 






15th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., . , 


July 


3, 1863. 


Lewis, George F., 






12th Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


1, 1863. 


Lewis, John E., Corp., 






25th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


Lewis, William A., 






38th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Liberty, Joseph, . 






1st H. A., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


16, 1864. 


Liddy, Anthony, . 






37th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


5, 1864. 


Lincoln, Levi, Corp., . 






9th Batt. L. A., 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


18, 1864. 


Lindsey, Nicholas C, Corp., 






56th Inf., . 


Near Petersburg, Va., 


June 


17, 1864. 


Lines, Samuel, 






24th Inf., . 


New Berne, N. C, 


March 14, 1862. 


Lipman, Adolph, . 






9th Batt. L. A., . 


Gettysburg, Pa., 


July 


2, 1863. 


Litchfield, George S , Sergt., 






24th Inf., . 


Tranter's Creek, N. C, 


June 


5, 1862. 


Litchfield, Gilbert T., . 






29th Inf., . 


Knoxville, Tenn., 


Nov. 


29, 1863. 


Little, Hazen D., . 






2d Cav., 


Aldie, Va., .... 


July 


31, 1863. 



* Or Lewis, Fredeiick. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



387 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Bank. 



Command. 



Engagement. 



Date. 



Littlefield, George H., 
Littlefield, George W., 
Livingston, Aslier, 
Livingstone, Nelson S, 
Lloycl, Thomas, . 
Lloyd, William, . 
Lobdell, Joel J., . 
Locard, Lewis J., . 
Locke, Andrew J., 
Locke, George L., 
Locke, Warren P., 
Locking, Leonard A., Corp. 
Long, Cornelius, . 
Long, Jeremiah, Jr., 
Longdo, Frank, . 
Longdt, Joseph, . 
Lord, Alexander, . 
Lord, Charles L., Corp 
Lothrop, Addison A., 
Lothrop, Washington I 
Loud, Nathan N., Corp 
Loughlin, Michael, 
Lovejoy, James K., Corp., 
Lovering, Daniel A., 
Lovering, Daniel, . 
Lovering, Marcus C, 
Lovett, Patrick, . 
Low, Isaac M., 
Lowe, Francis, 
Lucas, George, 
Lucas, Henry, 
Lucas, Jonathan P., 
Lucy, George W., 
Ludwig, Frank, . 



39th Inf., 
40th Inf., 
2d Inf., 
2d Inf., 
54th Inf., 
54th Inf., 
37th Inf., 
54th Inf., 
1st H. A., 
16th Inf., 
32d Inf., 
33d Inf., 
9th Inf., 
35th Inf., 
17th Inf., 
57th Inf., 
15th Inf., 
3d Batt. L. 
26th Inf., 
13th Inf., 
11th Inf., 
36th Inf., 
3d Cav., 
13th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
21st Inf., 
37th Inf., 
5th Inf., 
54th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
12th Inf., 
20th Inf., 
19th Inf., 
31st Inf., 



A., 



Weldon Railroad, Va., 
Before Petersburg, Va., 
Cedar Mountain, Va., 
Cedar Mountain, Va., 
Fort Wagner, S. C, 
Fort Wagner, S. C, 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
James Island, S. C, 
Petersburg, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Bethesda Church, Va. 
Resaca, Ga., 
Gaines' Mill, Va., 
Antietam, Md., . 
Wise's Fork, N. C, 
Wilderness, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Yorktown, Va., . 
Winchester, Va., 
Manassas, Va., . 
Hatcher's Run, Va., 
Spotsylvania, Va., 
Winchester, Va., 
Cold Harbor, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Chantilly, Va., . 
Fort Stevens, D. C, 
Bull Run, Va., . 
Fort Wagner, S. C, 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
Fredericksburg, Va., 
Gettysburg, Pa., 
White Oak Swamp, Va., 
Cane River, La., 





Aug. 


19, 




July 


3, 




Aug. 


9. 




Aug. 


9, 




July 


18, 




July 


18, 




June 


4, 




July 


16, 




June 


16, 




Aug. 


29, 




June 


3, 




May 


15, 




June 


27, 




Sept. 


17, 




MarcL 


8, 




May 


6, 




July 


3, 




April 


5, 




Sept. 


19, 




Aug. 


30, 




Oct. 


27, 




May 


12, 




Sept. 


19, 




June 


3, 




July 


3, 




Sept. 


1, 




July 


12, 




July 


21, 




July 


18, 




July 


3, 




Dec. 


13, 




July 


3, 




June 


30, 




April 


23, 



, 1864. 
, 1864. 
, 1862. 
, 1862. 
, 1863. 
, 1863. 
, 1864. 
, 1863. 
, 1864. 
, 1862. 
, 1864. 
, 1864. 
, 1862. 
, 1862. 
, 1865. 
, 1864. 
, 1863. 
, 1862. 
, 1864. 
, 1862. 
, 1864. 
, 1864. 
, 1864. 
, 1864. 
, 1863. 
, 1862. 
, 1864. 
, 1861. 
, 1863. 
, 1863. 
, 1862. 
, 1863. 
, 1862. 
, 1864. 



888 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action - 


- Continued. 


Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


Lunt, Richard K., 








48th Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Lunt, Thomas P., 








32d Inf., . 


Chancellorsville, Va., . 


May 


2, 1863. 


Lunt, William H., 








38th Inf., . 


Red River, La., . 


April 


13, 1864. 


Lunton, John C, . 








56th Inf., . 


Crater Petersburg, Va., 


July 


30, 1864. 


Luther, Joseph S., 








40th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


1, 1864. 


Luzarder, Joseph M., . 








39th Inf., . 


Weldon Railroad, Va., 


Aug. 


IS, 1864. 


Lyman, Daniel W., 








52d Inf., . 


Port Hudson, La., 


June 


14, 1863. 


Lyman, John B., Jr., . 








IstH. A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


Lyman, William, . 








IstH. A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1861. 


Lynch, John, 








16th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


3, 1864. 


Lynch, Maurice, . 








9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


Lyon, Charles H., 








1st Cav., 


Ashland, Va., 


May 


11, 1864. 


Lyon, Marcus E., 








24th Inf., . 


Deep Run, Va., . 


Aug. 


16, 1864. 


Lyons, Martin, 








19th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862 


McAlpin, Francis, 








19th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


McAudrews, Edward, . 








16th Inf., . 


Williamsburg Road, Va., . 


June 


18, 1862. 


McAndrews, John, Musiciai 


i. 






56th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


July 


6, 1864. 


McAuley, Daniel, 








3d Cav., . 


Bayou Jack, La., 


May 


1863. 


McBrian, William, 








9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


McCabe, Thomas, 2d, . 








37th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


12, 1864. 


McCabe, William H., . 








1st Cav., . 


Deep Bottom, Va., 


Aug. 


16, 1864. 


McCafferty, James E., Capt 


•> 






9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


McCalray, George B., . 








59th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


McCarnmon, James, . 








2d Cav., 


Dranesville, Va., 


Feb. 


22, 1864. 


McCann, James, Corp., , 








9th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


5, 1864. 


McCanna, John, . 








30th Inf., . 


Near Baton Rouge, La., 


June 


6, 1862. 


McCarter, Charles, 








IstH. A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


McCarthy, Charles, 








28th Inf., . 


Secessionville, S. C, . 


June 


16, 1862. 


McCarthy, Thomas F., 








12th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


McCarty, Daniel F., 








26th Inf., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


McCarty, John, . 








30th Inf., . 


Cedar Creek, Va., 


Oct. 


19, 1864. 


McCarty, Patrick, 








16th Inf., . 


Williamsburg Road, Va., . 


June 


18, 1862. 


McClelland, Andy, 








34th Inf., . 


New Market, Va., 


May 


15, 1864. 


McCloskey, George E , 








17th Inf., . 


Kinston, N. C, . 


March 


10, 1865. 



MASS. OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION. 



389 



List of Massachusetts Officers and Soldiers killed in Action — Continued. 



Name and Rank. 


Command. 


Engagement. 


Date. 


McCole, Patrick, . 




. 


28th Inf., . 


Chantilly, Va., . 


Sept. 


1, 1862. 


McConnell, John W., . 




• 


1st Cav., . 


Aldie, Va., .... 


June 


17, 1863. 


McConologne, Neil, 




• 


9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


McCormick, James, 




• 


7th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


McCormick, John, Corp., . 




• 


33d Inf., . 


Resaca, Ga., 


May 


15, 1864. 


McCoy, Robert, . 




• 


57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


McCuen, James, . 




• 


3d Cav., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


McCullough, Patrick, . 




• 


20th Inf., . 


Ball's Bluff, Va., 


Oct. 


21, 1861. 


McCully, Robert, . 




• 


IstH. A., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


19, 1864. 


McCutcheon, William, , 




• 


30th Inf., . 


Cedar Creek, Va., 


Oct. 


19, 1864. 


McDavitt, Henry, 




• 


28th'Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


McDermot, Peter, . 




• 


58th Inf., . 


Spotsylvania, Va., 


May 


11, 1864. 


McDevitt, Hugh, . 




• 


3d Cav., . 


Winchester, Va., 


Sept. 


19, 1864. 


McDonald, Daniel, . . 




• 


57th Inf., . 


Wilderness, Va., 


May 


6, 1864. 


McDonald, George H., . 




• 


20th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


McDonald, James, Corp., . 




• 


2d Cav., . 


Mount Zion Church, Va., . 


July 


6, 1864. 


McDonald, John J., Sergt., . 




• 


28th Inf., . 


Secessionville, S. O., . 


June 


16, 1862. 


McDonald, John M., . 




• 


1st Cav., 


Brandy Station, Va., . 


June 


9, 1863. 


McDonald, Patrick, 




• 


20th Inf., . 


Ball's Bluff, Va., ' . 


Oct. 


21, 1861. 


McDonough, James F., , 




• 


9th Inf., . . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


McDonough, John, 




. 


20th Inf., . 


Antietam, Md., . 


Sept. 


17, 1862. 


McEnany, Peter, . 




• 


20th Inf., . 


Fredericksburg, Va., . 


Dec. 


11, 1862. 


McEvoy, Joseph, Corp., 




• 


16th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


McFarland, Charles A., 




• 


25th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


19, 1864. 


McFarland, Thomas, Capt., 


. 


58th Inf., . 


Cold Harbor, Va., 


June 


3, 1864. 


McFarlane, Charles, Sergt., 


• 


10th Inf., . 


Malvern Hill, Va., 


July 


1, 1862. 


McFarlin, Wilson, Corp., . 


v 


18th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


30, 1862. 


McFaul, Thomas, 




• 


20th Inf., . 


Petersburg, Va., 


June 


22, 1864. 


McFeeley, William, 




■ 


9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


McGaffigan, Patrick,* . 




. 


9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


McGee, Patrick, Sergt., 




• 


9th Inf., . 


Gaines' Mill, Va., 


June 


27, 1862. 


McGinley, John, . 




• 


16th Inf., . 


Manassas, Va., . 


Aug. 


29, 1862. 


McGinniss, Edward J., Sergt., 


• 


1st Inf., . 


Gettysburg, Pa , 


July 


2, 1863. 


McGlaughlin, John, 


• 


33d Inf., . 


Lookout Mountain, Tenn., 


Oct. 


29, 18